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Learning2gether with ELTAI 2014 Post-conference Webinar

Englishbridges - Sun, 2014-09-14 16:05
Learning2gether met on Sun Sep 14 1000 GMT with Post-conference  webinar ELTAI 2014

The webinar started in WizIQ, recording at: http://go.wiziq.com/2tsw 

Eventually Vance Stevens joined in WizIQ and guide participants there to join a Google Hangout on Air (HoA) 

This special Learning2gether event was a part of the post-conference of the 9th International and 45th Annual ELTAI Conference – http://eltaiconferences.com/WEBINAR_14.html

ELTAI is the English Language Teachers’ Association of India, Rajasthan: Jaipur Chapter (An Associate of the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language [IATEFL], U.K.)

POST CONFERENCE WEBINAR Coordinators: Dr. Ashok Kapil and Dr. V.Anitha Devi

Instructions for joining the Hangout (you can join directly in the HoA or you can watch and listen to the stream)

If you wish to join directly, you need to

  1. Log on to your Google (e.g. Gmail) account
  2. Put on your headphones or ear buds
    (If you have no headset please listen to the stream. Sound from speakers creates echo in the Hangout)
  3. Click on the link to launch the HoA
    https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/hoaevent/AP36tYf6eFPWuEIQwgAJmI4BKvOzHhLcX4UrJy3S5QFvn2yhaY03kQ?authuser=0&hl=en
  4. Activate your mic and webcam (optional)
    1. Unmute your mic when ready to talk
    2. Please mute your mic when not talking.

If you wish to listen on the stream, you can do so in any of four ways

  1. You can visit http://webheadsinaction.org/live (here you will also find a Chatwing text chat)
  2. You can visit the Google+ event page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/c07nnb1ffl76k3ljflejink7nlo
  3. You can watch on YouTube directly: http://youtu.be/g4AkV7W28n8
  4. You can watch via the video embed below:

Vance Stevens touched on Learning2gether http://learning2gether.net/about and ways we could connect with Indian educators in the way we met  Anitha Devi through Webheads (Learning2gether is an extension of Webheads). The plan is to

  1. meet at WizIQ, where everyone will be for Dr. Sanjay Arora’s presentation
  2. explain how to move either to Hangout or to follow the stream on YouTube, as per the writeup here:
    Stevens, V. (2013). Tweaking Technology: How Communities Meet Online Using Google+ Hangouts On Air with Unlimited Participants. TESL-EJ, Volume 17, Number 3, pp. 1-16. Available: http://tesl-ej.org/pdf/ej67/int.pdf (also at http://www.tesl-ej.org/wordpress/issues/volume17/ej67/ej67int/).
  3. move to Hangout on Air (links to be provided shortly; as per instructions at http://webheadsinaction.com/live)

 

This is also a yesteryear and future experience.

 

 

Announcments

 


Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Eating 해장국, ‘Hangover Soup,’ While Sober

Koreabridge - Sun, 2014-09-14 12:41
Eating 해장국, ‘Hangover Soup,’ While Sober

Tom Gates of The Red Dragon Diaries and I are joined in our second food video collaboration (check out the first one, LIVE OCTOPUS, here) by our good friend, the lovely and talented Jookyeong, for a lovely meal of Haejang Guk, also known as “Hangover Soup.” It’s definitely not just for eating after a night of hard drinking!


JPDdoesROK is a former news editor/writer in New Jersey, USA, who served a one-year tour of duty in Dadaepo/Jangnim, Saha-gu, Busan from February 2013 to February 2014. He is now a teacher in Gimhae.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Busan to Seoul, a journey on Korea’s Cross-Country Cycling Road

Koreabridge - Fri, 2014-09-12 07:17
Busan to Seoul, a journey on Korea’s Cross-Country Cycling Road

It’s 07:30 and my alarm is chirping away at me. Time to drag myself out of bed, eat breakfast in a hurry, shower and go to school. Just another work-day. But, wait! It’s Saturday, why am I up at this unwelcoming hour? That’s right, you’ve decided to spend the Chuseok public holiday cycling across a whole country…

Day 1, Saturday 6th of September: 211.9km

http://www.strava.com/activities/190519453

http://www.strava.com/activities/190519336

I trundled across the bridge connecting Hadan, my home, and Eulsukdo, an island in the mouth of the Nakdong River. Eulsukdo is many things, a poorly protected bird sanctuary in the ever-developing river estuary area, a private tennis club, a multi-purpose exercise complex and also the beginning (or end) of Korea’s Cross-Country Cycle Road. On this particular Saturday morning the bleak river-mist was lingering with a slight autumnal chill and intermittent light rain was dampening the pavement under my wheels. I took a picture of my bike next to the engraved stone marking the beginning of my adventure and stamped the back of my bus ticket home from Seoul (the certification centre at Eulsukdo was out of stock of trail passports). The beginning of the trail is quite familiar to me as I have run and rode along it numerous times over the three years I have lived in the area and despite bumping into a few Ultimate Frisbee friends near Hwamyeong, who were on a similar journey, I made quick work of zig-zagging amongst the early morning weekend cycle path ‘traffic’. As I left the city limits and flew past southern Yangsan the path cleared and I was soon cycling ahead of the pack (presumably there would be many people attempting the same route).

 

 

 

A shade over four hours had elapsed and the first 100km was already in the bank, the path out of Busan is mostly flat, long straight stretches hug the riverbank and are only briefly broken by a few detours along a tributary river and through a few small village roads. The sun was out now, the mist having burned off progressively and the rain having abated a long time ago. At this point my first problem arose. Food and drink. My water bottle was empty and two Gatorades were long gone, I did have an oatmeal bar but that had been hastily munched 20km ago. I needed to refuel. There had been no shops on the route so far and I was relieved to roll into a small village on the opposite side of the river to Namji. There were no viable lunch options, just a bunch of river fish restaurants but I thought that the old lady outside her own convenience store would have some snack bars and some drinks. When I produced my debit card she shook her head and I learnt my first lesson, cash rules in the countryside. I spent my last 1,000원 (50p) on two bottles of water and rolled on.

 

Outside Namji I hit the first real hill as the path wandered away from the river briefly and into the rice-paddies and farmland. The hill was ridiculously steep and the path had given way to dusty and rocky dirt, more dangerous than the ride up was the ride down and my brakes got their first real test. After a few river crossings, another steep, but fairly short hill, and a further 45km I finally found somewhere to buy some food at Hapcheonbo. I have never been so delighted to see a chain convenience store than when I rolled across the bridge from the west bank to the east bank, I even gave out a slightly aggressive shout of relief. After purchasing enough water and gatorade for the day I sat down on a picnic table outside and had some noodles, cookies and an ice-cream. A little later a well-cycled Korean man rolled in and we chatted about our journeys and he enjoyed a little giggle at my expense as I recounted my personal drought.

After Hapcheonbo I made my first navigational error. The trail signs appeared to invite me to travel over another sharply steep and poorly surfaced mini-mountain and where the end of the descent appeared to rejoin the river bank I somehow confused the trail signposting and I headed inland. I was bewildered to see the six sharp towering points of the Hapcheonbo bridge reappearing in my horizon and it was then that I realised I had circled around the base of the small mountain I had just unnecessarily climbed. The cost of my mistake was an extra 11km and my second snake encounter of the day (Snakes, equally dead and alive were a frequent occurrence during the trip).

Having just made one mistake the last thing I wanted to do was make another, but this is exactly what I did. At another bridge crossing further up the river the signposts appeared to invite me to cross the river, and technically I was still on the right path when I did, (many parts of the trail can be ridden on either side of the Nakdong River) however I was now about to embark on a 12km mountain bike path. As I suffered on the rocky, sandy, muddy mountain bike trail, bordered by ditches, trees and drop-offs, dipping and falling over insanely steep inclines and narrow tight corners I gazed longingly across to the very visible east river bank and the smooth snaking path. As I reflect, I remember passing the surprised luminously adorned old man who I met at the convenience store (he must have passed me as I took my unnecessary detour a few minutes earlier) and him ringing his bell several times as I began to cross the bridge. What I had thought was friendly bell-ringing was probably a ‘where are you going you idiot’ bell ringing.

My bike and I survived the mountain bike course, my narrow racing tyres scampered for grip a few times and I nearly came off when I hit some sand at the bottom of a decline. The light was beginning to fade and I made a concerted and committed effort to get to Daegu. The last 10km of trail threaded through some riverside reeds and I  managed to miss out on a stamping booth and ultimately I decided to just not bother collecting them, especially without having the passport.

I reached Daegu just after darkness descended and my final blow came in the form of a puncture as I navigated my way to a motel area on the west side of Daegu in Horim-dong. I checked into the very plush but reasonably cheap Wave Motel and fixed my puncture in the bathroom. Feeling famished I walked across the road and had samgyeopsal by myself. The lady owner informed me the minimum order was a serving for three people (this is common in barbecue restaurants) and I told her in my broken Korean that would be perfect. She and a few of her friends, the only other diners, were interested in the reason for my appetite and I explained my trip. Seeing how bushed I was she sat down and cooked the food for me at the table. A pretty good end to a grueling but ultimately successful day.

Day 2, Sunday 7th of September: 136.0km

http://www.strava.com/activities/190965450

I took a bit of a lie-in and headed out around 10:00, a local cyclist helped guide me back to the trail in the morning and although my legs were feeling a little fatigued I soon found my rhythm on the ride out of Daegu. For the first 30km or so I rode with a young Korean lad on a very fancy racing bike and without speaking a word we somehow managed to organise a complimentary slip-streaming effort. We sped along the tarmac pathway and disturbed a sunbathing viper, well he did as he ran over it. I think he didn’t see it to be fair and he looked a little surprised as his tyres briefly jumped. Another snake to add to the roadkill total. After passing another of the numerous Nakdong river weir system and bridges we parted company and I pressed on ahead. The path was quite generic during the morning and the monotony was only dispersed by frequent stops to ensure I was fully stocked on water and Gatorade, (which I was now sick of drinking) the sun was out in full-force today and I didn’t want to be caught-short again.

I stopped for lunch at Nakdong-ri and the kindly owner gave me some dried persimmon to boost my energy as he accompanied me in the shade and quizzed me on my nationality, age etc… and gleefully informed me about the hilly section ahead of me. I consumed a refreshing ice-cream and left him behind to deal with an SUV full of excited children.

True to his word the next 30km were hilly, the cycle path often gave way to roads with light traffic and I weaved across the contours of the terrain and over the river several times. It was during this time I noticed my chain was a little dry and I was considering getting some oil when I had a chance, but being the first actual day of the Chuseok holiday, as well as a Sunday I felt my chances would be limited, especially with no settlements in sight. Oddly enough there was a bicycle museum shortly after Gyeongcheon Bridge and despite the grounds being packed with kids on hire bikes it appeared the workshop was closed. I carried on, hit a really hilly, dusty gravel section and my front derailleur promptly collapsed into the chain ring.

This was a problem, and as I tried to fix it with my minimal multi-tool and a pathetic adjustable spanner the problem became greater. Even a couple of lads heading in the opposite direction couldn’t help me and I decided the only course of action was to walk, and coast the downhill sections when possible, back to the bike museum. 4km later in the searing heat I arrived at the bike museum and explained my situation to a receptionist, she took me to the mechanic, a slightly uncomfortable young man who explained to me they only fixed punctures. At this point I could see into the bike hire workshop and perfectly visible was a bike stand and a ton of tools, with no other options at my disposal I essentially verbally forced my way in. He eventually came round and even helped me with the tricky process of resetting the derailleur height, tension and alignment and as we both sweated and pulled on cables and loosened and tightened parts an old man came along and ensured he criticised everything we did.

With a generous spray of oil and to the relief of the mechanic and myself I returned to the trail and re-did the 4km of rolling forest hills. The following 35km were a pleasant burn through rice-paddies and along open and clear riverside paths. I sped along with a little unease, frequently glancing between the suspicious signposting and my untrustworthy derailleur.

Shortly before I rolled into Moongyeong City I had passed two western riders and as I sat by the riverside park in Moongyeong City contemplating if I should carry on or pick out a motel from the ones I could visibly see behind a train station they also stopped close by. Looking at their very professional equipment I thought it may be a good idea to seek their advice and after looking at my smartphone map app and their Garmin computers we all came to the conclusion that here would be a good place to stop for the day as there was a major mountainous section ahead that would be best left for tomorrow. After rejecting one grumpy lady’s motel we checked into another one. After taking a shower and bumping into PVL, a friend of some friends that I have met a few times, and who had ridden with Dan and Kelly the previous day for a short while, we headed out to eat some dinner. At a dalkgalbi (spicy chicken and veg) restaurant they shared their experiences of riding all over Korea and I was grateful to get some good information on some of the trails ahead. After a plentiful meal and some good company I was delighted to get an early night.

Day 3, Monday 8th of September: 181.3km

http://www.strava.com/activities/191573001

 

Dan and Kelly planned to leave at the crack of dawn but I was much happier to sleep until around 08:00, I bumped into PVL again in the motel lobby, he was having problems trying to find somewhere to get breakfast, we exchanged numbers and said if we were in the same town later we would grab some dinner.

 

My first call of business was to purchase plenty of drinks and some sunscreen to protect what was now a badly scorched neck and set of knees. I rode the short way back to the path and set off into some lush farmland areas that led to an ever increasing and ominous mountain range. I was now on the Saejae Trail and had left the Nakdong River behind me yesterday. The Saejae Trail is notable as it crosses Moongyeong Saejae Provincial Park which is part of a series of mountainous parks that form a distinct ridge dividing the country in half. The 100km Saejae Trail is highlighted by the 5km long and 550m elevation climb of the Bakdudaegan Ihwaryeong Pass, after 30km of gradual incline, snaking between fields, riversides and small valleys I hit the climb head on. With the distance of the last two days hanging in my legs I was impressed that I manged to climb over the pass without taking a break, at the top of the pass I was congratulated by a young German lad who was heading the other way and took some mandatory self-pride photos. The descent was smooth on the wide twisting tarmac road and I was only fearful of my brakes giving out when they made the occasional disgruntled squeal. Another steep but slightly shorter 3km climb followed and after that the road eventually steered itself out of the mountain valleys and into scorching hot Chungju. Today was the main Chuseok holiday day, the route was noticeably quiet and I mostly encountered families who were out at the roadsides to tend to their families mounded graves, a traditional aspect of Chuseok holiday festivities.

 

Chungju marked the end of the 100km Saejae Trail and this is where I joined the Namhangang Trail (South Han River). This was a big psychological boost, the big climbs were behind me and the Han river of course leads to Seoul. At a quiet bike trail cafe just after leaving Chungju I grabbed some dumplings and water from a kind lady and her family who also shared some of their Chuseok holiday treats with me and then set off along the scenic trail north towards Yeoju and hopefully to Yangpyeong where I wished to spend the night.

Although I was hurting a little today, a culmination of the previous two days efforts and the mountain climbs in the morning, the consistent pathways and lack of significant elevation after the mountain pass ensured I rode at a good speed throughout the afternoon. Coupled with a day of no mechanical issues and some more considered navigational choices using both signposts and Naver Maps (a Korean version of Google Maps) I really enjoyed my afternoon spin to Yangpyeong and arrived just before the sunset. The scenery along the South Han River was at times breathtaking and the suns low late evening light highlighted the horizon and river waters beautifully.

 

In Yangpyeong I took a diversion from the path into the town centre and despite being rejected by one grouchy motel lady who did not want my bicycle inside I soon found one nice lady who did. I showered and bought myself some oven roasted chicken from a nearby take-out and refueled while watching Skyfall on a movie channel.

Day 4, Tuesday 9th of September: 56.1km

http://www.strava.com/activities/191914111

 

If it wasn’t for my mishaps on day one and my mechanical issues on day two I think I would have reached Seoul the previous evening. In the end I had to finish the last 56km on Tuesday morning. I had considered carrying my journey onto Incheon originally, but now that I wasn’t collecting the stamps for the passport there seemed little point to cycle 60km just to see the depressing brown estuary waters of Incheon. I left Yangpyeong around 08:00, as I had gone to sleep so early the previous evening, and this meant I completed my journey at 10:30 at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Stadium. The morning began in fine fashion as I zipped along an old railway line, flying along the tunnels burrowing their way under small valley peaks.

As I approached Seoul the trail noticeably grew busier, local riding teams were out in their team colours and inexperienced riders and random pedestrians did their best to meander and wobble in front of me. After all I had been through the previous days this was probably the most dangerous section! It was also here that I was overtaken  by someone for the first time, four times in fact! The journey was not a race but I was delighted at the pace I could keep along the way, especially considering I was on a cheap Korean version of a hybrid bike.

By the end I completed the journey over three days and two hours on the fourth morning. With the help of today’s modern smartphone tracking apps I can tell you this was a total of 26 hours 20 minutes and 54 seconds of riding time covering 585.3km at an average speed of 22.2kmh and climbing 6276m. Good, average or bad I don’t know but I’ve never felt a greater sense of achievement.

Having a good chunk of spare time remaining on the holiday period I scooted over to an area of Seoul near DongSeoul Bus Terminal where I would depart the following evening. I checked into a motel near Konkuk University on the edge of a lively area and spent the afternoon and evening with my Korean friend Dia, most of which I spent feeding food to my famished body.

I enjoyed a true holiday lie-in until 11:00 the next day, I checked out of the motel and the kind lady locked my bike in a store room while I went off to meet Luke, a friend from when I lived in Changwon. We both played football for the same team a few years back and we visited Japan two summers ago. We spent the afternoon catching up in Itaewon, a popular foreigner area which has fortunately now left a better memory on me than the last time I visited there a few years back. We had a decent burger at Gecko’s and had a few pints in the afternoon sun at the Crafthouse and Magpie Brewing. We grabbed the subway, Luke went off to work on his thesis and I cruised my bike along the busy Seoul pavements to the express bus terminal. I shoved my bike in the storage area under the bus and chatted to a lovely old lady from Daegu for twenty minutes before the bus set off. Just to crown a perfect trip the bus pulled into Nopo station in Busan early and I caught the last subway home rather than having to cycle 20km across the city at midnight.

What a journey, what an adventure, if you are reading this thinking about if you should take this cycling trip I implore you to do it.


Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Busan International Shakespeare Festival @ Dalmaji Amphitheatre

Koreabridge - Thu, 2014-09-11 01:33

From: https://www.facebook.com/events/688601611195586

Join Shakespeare in Busan and cities around Korea for an afternoon of merriment, monologues, and music!
Busan, Daegu, Masan, Jeongup, Gwangju, and Ulsan have come together to bring you the best of the Shakespearean entertainment for Busan's fifth annual Shakespeare in the Park event. Performances will be in English with a couple Korean pieces. 

Come on over to Dalmaji Amphitheatre on September 13th at 3 (come earlier to get a good seat)! Bring a picnic! Bring wine! Bring friends and a blanket to sit on! 
Just hop in a taxi and tell them 'Dalmaji, Alexander Restaurant'.


Act 1
MUSIC BY JARED MAY
Introduction
-Ryan Estrada
Othello (Act 1, Scene 3)
-Director and Performer: Jeong Hyeok Jin
Dogfish (written by Ryan Estrada)
-Director: Ryan Estrada
-Performers: Indy Randhawa, Michael Uchrin, Kerry Maher, Suzanne Farrell, Kim Hyun Sook
Madness of Hamlet
-Director: Victoria Anderson
-Performers: Tammy Louise Rak, Rachel Mikolajczyk, Stephanie Seaman
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
-Director: Jeffrey Schoenfeld
-Performers: Jeffrey Schoenfeld, Lawrence Kent
Bitter Sauce
-Director: Carrie Heeter
-Performers: Carrie Heeter, Michael Uchrin, Holly Ive Bartkowiak
MUSIC BY JARED MAY

15 MINUTE INTERMISSION

Act 2
MUSIC BY JARED MAY
Titus Andronicus (Act 2, Scene 5)
-Director: Benjamin William Slater
-Performers: Patrick Sanders, S
Othello (Act 5, Scene 2)
-Directors and Performers: Indy Randhawa, Carrie Heeter
The Tempest (monologues) 
-Director and Performer: Juli Johnson
A Midsummer Nights Dream (monologue)
-Director and Performer: Holly Ive Bartkowiak
A Midsummer Nights Dream (Act 3, Scene 2)
-Director:
-Performers:
Unknown
Directors and Performers:
MUSIC BY JARED MAY

Busan International Shakespeare Festival @ Dalmaji Amphitheatre
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Chuseok Blues

Koreabridge - Wed, 2014-09-10 14:58
Chuseok Blues

 

Last night, I was reading an article about fake casts for daughters-in-law in Korea who want to avoid Chuseok chores. According to the article,  the fake casts sold like hotcakes. Women wear them on Chuseok and pretend that they are injured, so they won’t have to help around the kitchen. One may ask, “Why do these women resort to deception just to shun house work?’ I may not have the gall to wear a fake cast and lie to my parents-in-law like these women, but I am one of the many myeonuris who dread Chuseok chores.

Chuseok (추석: Thanksgiving Day) is one of the biggest and most important holidays in Korea when families visit their ancestral homes and gather to share ceremonial feasts, but for a myeonuri (며느리: daughter-in-law) like me, Chuseok is more of donkey work than a celebration of gratitude for a bountiful harvest. I don’t mean to sound so negative aboutChuseok, but when this holiday comes, it’s impossible to enjoy my days off because of all the chores that I have to do.

Chuseok holiday period lasts for three days, but this year, it is from September 6 to 10. Imagine five days of agony! It’s not that myeonuris work continuously all those days, but we just can’t get over the so-called “daughter-in-law holiday syndrome” until Chuseok is officially over.

Lucky for me, I am NOT in Korea, so this year, I was able to evade all the chores and the stress that come with Chuseok. All I had to do was to call my parents-in-law in Korea and greet them.

 

Because Chuseok is a big celebration, there is a lot of food that needs to be prepared. My husband comes from a traditional clan, so the women in the family are the ones obliged to do all the work in the kitchen, while the men play Go-stop, watch TV or enjoy their chitchat. As much as I loathe the chores, which I know are not that much compared to othermyeonuris whose families perform ancestral memorial rites, I hate the fact that women do all the tedious work while men have all the fun.

The unfairness of Chuseok preparation as illustrated here (SOURCE: The Korea Blog)

Our Chuseok chores begin the day before the actual celebration. We wake up early and go to the eldest uncle’s house to prepare the food for the next day. Most mothers-in-law and daughters-in-law work together, but my Omonim (mother-in-law) is always busy with her business, so she never comes to help. My husband has many uncles, so their wives, the oldermyeonuris, do most of the cooking, while my sisters-in-law and I, the younger myeonuris, help with the preparation and do the cleaning. I always volunteer to cook jeon, because it seems to be the easiest thing to do… and I like arranging them nicely on a tray once they are cooked. Mind you, I’m not talking about frying four or five kinds of jeon for a small family. It’s for the whole clan! It takes me the entire morning to finish the task. After tidying up the kitchen or washing the dishes, I’m free to go… but NOT really free, because there’s work that needs to be done in the house, too.

Jeon, also known as Korean pancake, is served as an important food for jesasang (제사상) or ceremonial table setting for ancestral rites.

 

As Christians, we don’t perform ancestral rites on Chuseok called charye (차례), so we don’t have to prepare an elaborate ceremonial feast. In the morning, one of my husband’s uncles, who is a pastor, leads worship. After that, the women will be busy in the kitchen. The men are served breakfast. Abonim (father-in-law) and the uncles get to eat first, and they always have the best seats in the house. Omonim and the aunties rarely eat together with their husbands. I’ve noticed that the older women are more concerned with refilling their husbands’ bowls than minding their own food. This isn’t the case with me and my sisters-in-law. We eat at the same table with our husbands. (Sometimes it’s our husbands who serve us. ^^)

Maybe because we are much younger, we have learned to do things differently. We cater to our husbands, but at the same time, we take care of our needs. Servin

g the elders, however, is A MUST.

 

Myeonuris are expected to stay in the eldest uncle’s house for the whole day. We take our lunch and dinner there, but most of the time, we cook, serve and clean. In the afternoon, the men go to their ancestors’ graves to pay respects, while the women chat a little or take a rest.

 

Ceremonial table setting for charye with many Korean traditional food (SOURCE: The Chosun Ilbo)

 

   

 

    My first Chuseok wasn't so bad. I was interested in learning how to cook traditional Korean food, so I didn't mind working in the kitchen... but when I was left to wash tons of dishes by myself, I felt like crying. My husband must have known how upset I was, so he came to help me. The aunties teased him, because he was the only man in the kitchen. That is probably why he stayed away from the kitchen from then on.

 

Last year, my in-laws decided to have our own Chuseok gathering in the house besides the one annually hosted by the eldest uncle's family. I didn't fancy the idea, because it meant more house work having two gatherings in one day, but what can a myeonuri do? I have two sisters-in-law who also help with the chores, but their responsibilities begin with setting the table and end with putting away the dishes. They never stay too long in the house, I guess because they know what awaits them when the party's over. It's usually the eldest son's wife, the older myeonuri, who has to do most of the work, but in my husband's family, it's the other way around. My husband is the youngest son, which makes me the youngest myeonuri, but we live with the in-laws, so most of the older myeonuri duties are given to me.

 

 

The truth is, my Chuseok chores are nothing compared to those of other myeonuries. Some myeonuris I know spend days making Chuseok preparations, while mean mothers-in-law constantly hound them. I am grateful for my Omonim, because she doesn't pressure me. My husband's relatives are kind, too... at least this is a consolation.

Some myeonuris have to endure hours of travel time to get to their in-laws' home provinces only to work like slaves in the kitchen. My husband's paternal relatives live nearby, so we don't have to travel far. What gets me is the work load and not being able to spend the holiday as I please.

Before marriage, I was told that foreign wives are usually given less work, since Chuseok is something new to them, but I never believed that. I have always known that being a foreigner does not give any daughter-in-law in Korea an excuse for failing to fulfill her duties as a myeonuri, especially on important family gatherings when all eyes are on us. Foreigner or not, married women in Korea are bound by the traditional role of an obedient and diligent daughter-in-law.

Now that Chuseok is finally over, let me congratulate my fellow myeonuris for making it through another year of "forced labor". I know that most of us rarely get thanks or thumbs up, but everyone knows that Chuseok won't be possible without our hard work.

 

From Korea with Love
Chrissantosra.wordpress.com


 

 

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Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Learning2gether with Post-conference webinar ELTAI 2014

Englishbridges - Wed, 2014-09-10 13:59
Event Date/Time: Sun, 2014-09-14 10:00Primary Audience: Language Educators (Teachers)

 

Learning2gether Sun Sep 14 1000 GMT with Post-conference  webinar ELTAI 2014

This special Learning2gether event is a part of the post-conference of the 9th International and 45th Annual ELTAI Conference

http://eltaiconferences.com/WEBINAR_14.html

ELTAI is the English Language Teachers' Association of India, Rajasthan: Jaipur Chapter

(An Associate of the International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language [IATEFL], U.K.)

 

POST CONFERENCE WEBINAR Coordinators: Dr. Ashok Kapil and Dr.V.Anitha Devi

Date: 14 September 2014

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

ELT Live#3 - Mobile Tools and Strategies for ELT

Englishbridges - Wed, 2014-09-10 13:33
Event Date/Time: Wed, 2014-09-17 12:00Primary Audience: Language Educators (Teachers)

Sept. 17 1200GMT, 9pm KST
Global Times:http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/fixedtime.html?iso=20140917T21&p1=594&ah=1

Topic:  We're back on the air to discuss all things mobile - apps, strategies, hardware. 

Tune in live at http://englishbridges.net/live

Please post any questions, thoughts or resources below.  If you're interested in participating, please contact me. 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Ray Rice and Domestic Violence

Englishbridges - Wed, 2014-09-10 11:53
Forum Category: Current Events (News, Social/Political Issues) Discussions


Ray Rice is an American football player.  On February 15, 2014, Rice and his fiancée Janay Palmer were arrested and charged with assault after a physical altercation in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Celebrity news website TMZ.com posted a video of Rice striking Palmer in an elevator, apparently knocking her out, and then dragging her body out of the lift. The Ravens issued a statement following TMZ's release of the video, calling Rice's domestic violence arrest a "serious matter". The matter is being handled by the Atlantic County Prosecutor's Office.

For the incident, Rice was suspended for the first two games of the 2014 NFL season. The criminal charges were later dropped after Rice agreed to undergo court-supervised counseling. In a news conference announcing longer suspension lengths for future domestic violence incidents, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said that he "didn't get it right" in deciding Rice's punishment.

On September 8, 2014, TMZ released additional footage from an elevator camera showing Rice punching Palmer. The Baltimore Ravens terminated Rice's contract as a result. Shortly afterward, Goodell announced that Rice had been suspended from the NFL indefinitely.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

  • What punishment do you think is appropriate in this situation?
  • What role do you think the video should play in determining punishment?
  • Should consequences for professional atheletes be different than for others?
  • Was it acceptable for TMZ to publish these videos?
  • Should Janay's wishes in this situation affect legal and/or professional consquences?
Link to Sites/Articles: Ray Rice cut by Ravens, suspended by NFL indefinitelyRay Rice’s wife is the one and only victim in their disputeTMZ says Ray Rice video 'one of biggest stories' it has ever done Ray Rice’s Wife Posts Statement on Instagram Defending Husband, Attacking MediaRay Rice on Wikipedia
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

The New Apple Watch

Englishbridges - Wed, 2014-09-10 04:28
Forum Category: Current Events (News, Social/Political Issues) Discussions

  • What do you think will the new Apple watch is going to be a major new technology that everyone wants?
  • Do you have concerns about sharing health data or other private information?
  • What kind of wearable technology would you be most interested in having?
     
Link to Sites/Articles: Apple Pay, Apple Watch enable wallet-free lifestyle but security experts have concerns over health data
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Learning2gether in Hangout with Marijana Smolcec talking about the EU LLP Comenius Project

Webheadsinaction.org - Mon, 2014-09-08 11:03
 

A Learning2gether Hangout 14:00 GMT Sunday Sept 7, 2014

For further information on all our upcoming events please visit

http://tinyurl.com/learning2gether

(redirects to 
http://learning2gether.pbworks.com/w/page/32206114/volunteersneeded#Nextupcomingevents)

How this works at showtime

  • You can listen to the stream in the video embed above.
  • You can chat with us in real-time in the Chatwing space below
    or open it in a new window here http://chatwing.com/vancestev
  • You can listen to the stream at its YouTube URL http://youtu.be/6NwMNZGsCCc 
  • If there is space (up to 10 people) you are welcome to join us in the Hangout on Air
    • It will be a public hangout in the profile of VanceStev on Google+
    • It has an event page: https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/ct9iars7vmf2brlaf7o1llddslc 
    • You can join us via the direct link posted here just prior to show time
    • If the Hangout is full, listen to the stream and interact with us in the text chat
      • You can let us know if you want to join the Hangout
      • We will let you know when space comes available
      • When you enter the Hangout
        • Wear a headset to avoid broadcasting speaker sound back into the Hangout
        • Switch OFF the stream as it is on a delay and will create an echo for you

Connect with this Chatwing from any browser at http://chatwing.com/vancestev

 

!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+"://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");

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Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

ELT Live 2 - Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites

Englishbridges - Mon, 2014-09-08 01:41

  

ELT  Live Webcast#2
 Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots)
of class websites and other online resources. 
September 2, 2014 Download mp3


Participants

Links Mentioned

Course Websites Options

Group Chat Tools

Other Sites/Tools

Course Websites

Please comment below to share any related tools, resources, or sites. 

Chat Log Below

  Sung Hee Lim   hello everyone   jefflebow (Admin) FOMO - Fear of Missing Out   Elizabeth Anne   pbworks anyone?   Daniel Craig   Hello   Daniel Craig   I used to use pbworks, but haven't for a long time. I liked wikis, but haven't used them for a while.   Elizabeth Anne   I Just tried to join, but can't get in :-( I been working a system with my 3rd year Physics students for quite a while based on pbworks   Elizabeth Anne   wd've shared   jefflebow (Admin) just sent an invite Elizabeth Anne. Let me know if you don't see it   Elizabeth Anne   Oops - I heard the call, but I'm on the Koreabridge page and didn't see it ... don't worry - I'll go and fish around   Elizabeth Anne   got it   Daniel Craig   I used to use it with grad students at IU. I had them make their own sites and contribute to a class site. It worked quite well.   Daniel Craig   Hi Elizabeth   Lisa Bellamy   Hi there, this is my first hangout/webinar so if I do the wrong thing feel free to chastize/advise... Lis   Daniel Craig   Hi Lisa   Sung Hee Lim   hello Lisa    Lisa Bellamy   can see/hear     jefflebow (Admin) http://clyp.it/   Kuyang Landry   I can see you all   Kuyang Landry   except lisa   Daniel Craig   http://www.fotobabble.com/   jefflebow (Admin) Kuyang, would you like to join in the conversation?   jefflebow (Admin) If so, Hangout at: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/hoaevent/AP36tYd3bXFGk7day-dGQNrIZBgAUTo9GhIPAvUKNRoV7rWXOfsOhA?authuser=0&hl=en   Kuyang Landry   getting close to an hour   Kuyang Landry   thanks.   Kuyang Landry   kev   jefflebow (Admin) Kev, it is. Feel free to try again.   Kuyang Landry   I was just worried my mike was going to interrupt   Daniel Craig   http://versoapp.com/#verso   jefflebow (Admin) http://www.divii.org/   Kuyang Landry   I'll just listen for now. missed the first 45 minutes. cheers though   Kuyang Landry   hahaha I'm 42   Daniel Craig   http://www.danielcraig.com is my site, but I haven't been very good at updating it :-)   Kuyang Landry   thanks jeff. I'll watch the first part tomorrow.   Daniel Craig   http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/ SAMR   Sung Hee Lim   Thank you Jeff for creating such nice chance to share our ideas and experience   Guest 202   I'm late :(   Elizabeth Anne   A livebinder of all my student wikis (just last year missing) !   Elizabeth Anne   http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?present=true&id=600092   Elizabeth Anne   But where does your write-up go? I'd never heard of "clip it" and don't seem to find a recording app with that name! THANKS as usual for the inspiration :-) 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Learning2gether in Hangout with Marijana Smolcec talking about the EU LLP Comenius Project

Englishbridges - Sun, 2014-09-07 12:18

https://learning2getherdotnet.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/hangout-with-marijana-smolc48dec-on-the-eu-llp-comenius-project-6nwmnzgsccc.mp3
Download mp3: https://learning2getherdotnet.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/hangout-with-marijana-smolc48dec-on-the-eu-llp-comenius-project-6nwmnzgsccc.mp3

Learning2gether Sun Sep 7 1400 GMT Hangout with Marijana Smolčec on the EU LLP Comenius project

Marijana Smolčec met with us in Hangout to tell us a little about the EU LLP Comenius project she has been working on for the past 2 years. This was her presentation topic at the recent RSCON5 online conference

http://www.futureofeducation.com/forum/topics/comenius-multilateral-school-partnership-project-enterprising

At this event, Marijana did a great job explaining how her European Comenius project connected students from 4-countries on a project where they simulated starting companies in their respective countries based on wholesome foods produced locally in each country, and non-virtually transported the students to each of the 4 countries for events ranging from farmers markets that were in fact set up for the project (but in the videos look like the real thing), job interviews for one of the companies, and so on. They got on TV in their countries, produced eBooks, and the students learned a lot about business, culture, geography, cool tools to use in international communications both online and F2F and in documenting their experiences, really some amazing stuff in commitment to teaching and engagement of students. Marijana has talked about this before but I got her to slow down, back up, explain how it got started. Since it was just the two of us and not time bound, we explored and I screen shared it all. Checking the video just now I see I managed to put up the screen share and except for a slip of the mouse at 53 minutes, did not have any of the usual talking heads in the recording. But I think it was a good one, have a listen, https://plus.google.com/u/0/events/ct9iars7vmf2brlaf7o1llddslc

How this works at showtime

http://www.slideshare.net/msmolcec/comeniusmultilateral-project

Announcements

Earlier this week Sun Aug 31 – Learning2gether with Dawn Bikowski discussing gaming and language learning

http://learning2gether.net/2014/08/31/learning2gether-with-dawn-bikowski-discussing-gaming-and-language-learning/

 

Mon Sep 1 through Sun Oct 5 HSLMOOC14 on WizIQ

Healthy and Sustainable Living MOOC free online course affilated with WizIQ and Sustainability Studies (MASS) program at Ramapo College of New Jersey is scheduled for September 1 – October 5, 2014. You’re all invited: http://www.wiziq.com/course/62978-healthy-and-sustainable-living-mooc-2014

Blog: http://www.wiziq.com/teachblog/healthy-sustainability-living-mooc-wiziq/

Mon Sep 1 1500 GMT HSLMooc -Opening Ceremony

Class Presenter: Drs. Nellie Deutsch and Ludmila Smirnnova

Class Title: HSLMOOC14: Opening Ceremony.

Class Date: Monday, September 1, 2014

Class Time: 7:00 PM ((GMT+04:00) Abu Dhabi, Muscat)

 

Sat Sep 6 1330 GMT HSLMooc – Michael Edelstein on Sustainable Transition

Class Presenter: Professor Michael Edelstein, Ph.D

Class Title: HSLMOOC14: Making the Sustainable Transition

Class Date: Saturday, September 6, 2014

Class Time: 5:30 PM ((GMT+04:00) Abu Dhabi, Muscat)

Sat Sep 6 1600 GMT – Understanding The Teaching System on WizIQ: CO-Presenter

Drs. Nellie Deutsch and Ludmila Smirnova  ‘Understanding The Teaching System on WizIQ: CO-Presenter’

Sep_06 2014, 16:00 PM GMT

Click here to access the Class

Sun Sep 7 1330 GMT HSLMooc Discussion1: Regional Activists

Class Presenter: Aytakin Asgarova

Class Title: HSLMOOC14: Panel Discussion1: Regional Activists.

Class Date: Sunday, September 7, 2014

Class Time: 5:30 PM ((GMT+04:00) Abu Dhabi, Muscat)

Mon Sep 8 Martha Gold on MM5: Books and Lessons to Present Information on Moodle

Class Presenter: Martha Gold
Class Title: MM5: Books and Lessons to Present Information on Moodle.
Class Date: Monday, October 6, 2014
Class Time: 7:00 PM ((GMT+04:00) Abu Dhabi, Muscat)
Click here to access the class.

 

Sat Sep 6 L’usage de francais at Virtlantis

Time http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converted.html?iso=20140906T12&p1=234&p2=2059

Please have a look at the online activity calendar for additional info:
http://virtlantis.com/calendar/index.php

VIRTLANTIS is a free language learning resource and community of practice in the virtual worlds of Second Life® and Avination®.
We have been offering and facilitating free language learning activities since 2006.

What do we do at VIRTLANTIS?
We offer free informal learning activities for a growing number of languages!
Simply check out our activity calendar for additional information about our activities and how to participate.


Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Top 10 Things to Do in Seoul

Koreabridge - Sun, 2014-09-07 01:44
Top 10 Things to Do in Seoul I've been writing Seoul Searching for just over five years now and although I've mentioned a lot of great places to visit, it recently came to my attention that I have yet to put together a list of the best things to do in the city. Of course, "best" is a highly subjective word, and while everyone has their own ideas of what a visitor should experience during his or her stay, I have my own personal favorites. So, without further ado, here are the top ten things you should do on your stay in Seoul:

10. Tap into your artsy side

Koreans have always had an appreciation for the arts. From the intricately crafted ceramic pottery of the country's dynastic days to modern reinterpretations of pansori, a genre of musical storytelling, Korean artists know no limits. Explore ancient treasures at the National Museum of Korea- one of the largest in the world- or if your tastes are more contemporary, opt for a visit to the Seoul Museum of Art. For a complete list of exhibitions and concerts going on throughout the city, visit this website.

9. See a non-verbal performance

Treat yourself to a night of entertainment by booking tickets for one of the many high-energy non-verbal performances showing daily in theaters throughout the city. Miso, a personal favorite, showcases traditional dance, emotional music and some incredibly beautiful costumes, while Bibap is a food-centric story that utilizes martial arts and a whole lot of slapstick to keep the audience laughing from start to finish.



A non-verbal performance illustrates the beauty and mystery of Korean culture.
8. Sleep in a traditional house

For a truly Korean experience, spend a night or two in a hanok. These traditional homes, which are diminishing by the day, are a unique reminder of Korea's past and still preserve the country's history in their tiled roofs, papered windows, enchanting courtyards and heated floors. Bukchon Hanok Village is an especially picturesque neighborhood mostly comprised of these homes. It is, without a doubt, one of the most beautiful areas in the city and is conveniently wedged between Gyeongbok and Changdeok palaces, among other cultural relics, making it a great spot to rest your head after a long day of Seoul searching.

7. Get monk-y

Although the majority of Korean nationals today do not profess a specific religious orientation, Buddhism was once the national religion and its influence on the country is obvious, even in modern day Korea. There are a few temples in Seoul worth visiting, particularly during Buddha's Birthday in May, but one of the best places to get oriented to Buddhism is Bongeunsa, a 1,200 year old complex located in the heart of Gangnam's business district. Visitors with a deep interest in the religion can opt to stay overnight and live like a monk for a day (think grueling prostrations, vegetarian meals and a 4am wakeup call) but for those looking for a less intense look into the life of Buddhist monks, Bongeunsa offers a TempleLife program on Thursdays. Here, participants learn the basics of Seon meditation, the Korean tea ceremony and get a nice tour of the temple grounds.



Temple stay participants learn how to meditate.
6. Have a cuppa

Korea is a coffee-crazed nation, with a cafe on practically every block of every street. Still, there are a number of traditional tea houses primarily concentrated in Insadong. These cafes are easy to spot but the best are tucked away in the alleys of the neighborhood. My go-to is Moon Bird Thinks Only of the Moon, a tea house far more simplistic than its complicated name suggests. Shrouded in rustic decor, Moon Bird is a cozy spot to enjoy a cup of homemade omija (five-flavored) or yuja (Asian citrus) tea. Although the prices for these traditional teas are a bit costly (usually around 7,000 won), the complimentary tea snacks and atmosphere make it worth it.


5. Spend an afternoon on the Han

Seoul is often portrayed as a city of concrete and neon, so many are surprised to learn that there are a number of green spaces strewn across the Korean capital. My favorite place to soak up some sun is the Han River and the parks that border it. On any given day, locals can be found in these parks shooting hoops, riding bikes (which can be rented for pennies) and picnicking under sun shades. In the evenings, a musical fountain show is held at Banpo Bridge in which over 200 tons of water are sprayed out of the illuminated bridge in sync to musical tunes. In warmer months, free concerts are held and movies are shown on stages around the river.



Enjoy a bike ride and picnic on the picturesque Han River. (Photo: Talk To Me In Korean)
4. Explore Hongdae

Hongdae is a vibrant neighborhood known for being the creative hub of the country. Boasting a number of design shops, art galleries, indie music bars and fashion studios, the district is the perfect place to soak up the city's up-and-coming trends and youth culture. Spend an afternoon in Hongdae checking out unique (and sometimes strangely) themed coffee shops, snap photos of the colorful street art and chow down on gimmicky street snacks like nitrogen ice cream. After the sun sets, Hongdae really comes alive as thousands flock to the area's bars, dance clubs and noraebangs (private karaoke rooms) for round after round of drunken debauchery.



An indie band jams out in Hongdae's Children's Park. (Photo: Jeffrey Tripp)
3. Go on a food tour

The world is slowly becoming more aware of the tantalizing flavors Korean food has to offer and people from all corners of the globe are flocking to the peninsula to taste the cuisine in its most authentic form. While many restaurants in touris areas are foreigner-friendly, it can be difficult to find the gastronomic gems of Seoul, often located in obscure and hidden back alleys of lesser known neighborhoods. That's why going on a food tour is the best option to sample the tastiest treats Korea has to offer, all the while allowing English-speaking local residents to do the dirty work for you. From seafood market visits to Korean barbecue tours to pub hopping, there's a tour for just about everyone.



2. Hike a mountain

When I do decide to leave Korea, one of the things I'll miss most is having immediate access to gorgeous hiking trails and outstanding city views. A number of mountains can be easily accessed via Seoul's subway system and trails are clearly marked and maintained. The fact is Koreans- mostly of the elderly variety- have made a lifestyle out of hiking, investing thousands of dollars in colorful outdoor get-ups and equipment. Hiking is a social activity in itself and once on the trails, the cranky and pushy characteristics those of the older generations are known for seem to dissipate. Hikers are quite often eager share both their smiles and lunches of kimbap, fresh fruit and makgeolli- lots of makgeolli- with passersby. These interactions, in addition to the beautiful vistas offered by mountains like Bukhansan, Inwangsan and Dobongsan, make a hiking trip a must on any visit to Seoul.



Hikers take a picnic break. (Photo)
1. Get off the beaten path

Without a doubt, the best thing to do in Seoul is to get lost. The city is very much a treasure trove of sights and smells and sounds and tastes waiting to be taken in. While I have my own personal favorite off-the-beaten-path destinations I escape to every now and again, there are plenty others I have yet to discover. Seoul is an incredibly safe city which makes wandering its streets not only fun but secure as well. So don't feel the need to stick only to the areas your guidebook suggests. Get out there and experience all the surprises the city has waiting for you!

What's your number one thing to do in Seoul? Leave any suggestions I may have left out in the comments below.

Words and photos by Mimsie Ladner of Seoul Searching unless otherwise noted. Content may not be reproduced unless authorized.



Seoul Searching
www.MySeoulSearching.com

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Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Jinju Namgang Lantern Festival: Pixelated

Koreabridge - Sat, 2014-09-06 18:21
Jinju Namgang Lantern Festival: Pixelated

From October 1st ~ 12th hundreds of spirits, soldiers, and denizens from Korea’s past emblazon the night in the small fortified city of Jinju.

The Namgang Lantern Festival (진주 남강 유등 축제) is held every autumn in the small (for Korea) city of Jinju, South Gyeongsang Province. The festival not only commemorates the city’s great victory in the Imjin war, but also depicts traditional life in Korea at the time. Centred around the fortress and the Nam River (Namgang) outside, the lanterns bask the city in a beautiful glow. Accompanying the artistic luminosity are traditional foods, drinks, games, and fantastic performances of Joseon music, dance, and song.

City after city fell to samurai swords, yet Jinju refused to be capitulated. Utterly outnumbered and outgunned the ragtag army under the leadership of general Simin pushed the Japanese invaders back.

The city’s great triumph was short lived however as the samurai returned in greater numbers, and this time levelled everything. The conflict raged for a further six years and ended in stalemate.

The festival is not all soldiers and war though. Korea’s past customs, games, jobs, and beliefs are all represented in glorious glowing paper.

Here’s the monkey from the Chinese zodiac.

Daksaum, or chicken fight, is a traditional children’s wrestling game. The participants hold onto one leg and, hopping around like a chicken, try to knock their opponent’s leg to the floor.

Joseon men enjoy a tea ceremony… (I’ll tell you something about blood tea)

Young children giggle as they ride on tomorrow’s dinner.

Janggi is a chess like game originating in China and is still played by old folks in parks across Korea.

Outside the Nam river is illuminated by hundreds of floating lanterns.

Jinju is easy to reach from Busan or Seoul by bus or train. The festival last for several days and is likely to be very busy on the weekends. However, don’t let that deter you from experiencing one of Korea’s most awesome festivities.

A note from the Editor-in-Chimp: This post was originally featured here on Travel Wire Asia. Do me a favour and monkey on over there too!

The post Jinju Namgang Lantern Festival: Pixelated appeared first on Monkeyboy Goes.


http://monkeyboygoes.com

InstagramsFacebook Monkeyboy Goes: Monkeying around since 2010 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

ELT Live 2 - Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites

Koreabridge - Wed, 2014-09-03 01:59
ELT Live 2 - Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites

  

ELT  Live Webcast#2
 Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots)
of class websites and other online resources. 
September 2, 2014 Download mp3


Participants

Links Mentioned

Course Websites Options

Group Chat Tools

Other Sites/Tools

Course Websites

Please comment below to share any related tools, resources, or sites. 

Chat Log Below

  Sung Hee Lim   hello everyone   jefflebow (Admin) FOMO - Fear of Missing Out   Elizabeth Anne   pbworks anyone?   Daniel Craig   Hello   Daniel Craig   I used to use pbworks, but haven't for a long time. I liked wikis, but haven't used them for a while.   Elizabeth Anne   I Just tried to join, but can't get in :-( I been working a system with my 3rd year Physics students for quite a while based on pbworks   Elizabeth Anne   wd've shared   jefflebow (Admin) just sent an invite Elizabeth Anne. Let me know if you don't see it   Elizabeth Anne   Oops - I heard the call, but I'm on the Koreabridge page and didn't see it ... don't worry - I'll go and fish around   Elizabeth Anne   got it   Daniel Craig   I used to use it with grad students at IU. I had them make their own sites and contribute to a class site. It worked quite well.   Daniel Craig   Hi Elizabeth   Lisa Bellamy   Hi there, this is my first hangout/webinar so if I do the wrong thing feel free to chastize/advise... Lis   Daniel Craig   Hi Lisa   Sung Hee Lim   hello Lisa    Lisa Bellamy   can see/hear     jefflebow (Admin) http://clyp.it/   Kuyang Landry   I can see you all   Kuyang Landry   except lisa   Daniel Craig   http://www.fotobabble.com/   jefflebow (Admin) Kuyang, would you like to join in the conversation?   jefflebow (Admin) If so, Hangout at: https://plus.google.com/hangouts/_/hoaevent/AP36tYd3bXFGk7day-dGQNrIZBgAUTo9GhIPAvUKNRoV7rWXOfsOhA?authuser=0&hl=en   Kuyang Landry   getting close to an hour   Kuyang Landry   thanks.   Kuyang Landry   kev   jefflebow (Admin) Kev, it is. Feel free to try again.   Kuyang Landry   I was just worried my mike was going to interrupt   Daniel Craig   http://versoapp.com/#verso   jefflebow (Admin) http://www.divii.org/   Kuyang Landry   I'll just listen for now. missed the first 45 minutes. cheers though   Kuyang Landry   hahaha I'm 42   Daniel Craig   http://www.danielcraig.com is my site, but I haven't been very good at updating it :-)   Kuyang Landry   thanks jeff. I'll watch the first part tomorrow.   Daniel Craig   http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/ SAMR   Sung Hee Lim   Thank you Jeff for creating such nice chance to share our ideas and experience   Guest 202   I'm late :(   Elizabeth Anne   A livebinder of all my student wikis (just last year missing) !   Elizabeth Anne   http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?present=true&id=600092   Elizabeth Anne   But where does your write-up go? I'd never heard of "clip it" and don't seem to find a recording app with that name! THANKS as usual for the inspiration :-) 

 

JeffLebow.net

 Google+    Twitter    YouTube    Diigo   Facebook    LinkedIn

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

ELT Live 2 - Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites

Worldbridges Megafeed - Tue, 2014-09-02 15:36

63:10 minutes (28.92 MB)ELT  Live Webcast
' Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites and other online resources. '
September 2, 2014 


Participants

Links Mentioned

Course Websites Options

Group Chat Tools

Other Sites/Tools

Course Websites

Chat Log Below

read more

ELT Live 2 - Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites

EdTechTalk - Tue, 2014-09-02 15:36

63:10 minutes (28.92 MB)ELT  Live Webcast
' Hows, Whats, and Whys (or why nots) of class websites and other online resources. '
September 2, 2014 


Participants

Links Mentioned

Course Websites Options

Group Chat Tools

Other Sites/Tools

Course Websites

Chat Log Below

read more

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Celebrating 20 Years of Chingusai

Koreabridge - Tue, 2014-09-02 14:55
Celebrating 20 Years of Chingusai On Saturday night in Jongno, queer activists and allies gathered to celebrate the 20th year of Chingusai (Between Friends), a gay men’s group that has played a pivotal role in the gay rights movement in Korea. Their stated goals are to change society's distorted views of homosexuality, protect human rights and educate people on their rights, and promote HIV/AIDS education. They also organize a variety of groups with the aim of building a gay community such as G Boys (a gay chorus) and Marine Boys (a swim team). 
To celebrate their 20th year, a parade/protest was organized in the Jongno area of Seoul which has had a score of gay bars since the 1960s. Before the start of the parade, representatives of Chingusai gave instructions on the parade route and film director Kim Jho Gwang Su explained our cheer - a simple call-and-response about Chingusai, love, and LGBT rights (with the occasional 'get rid of President Park Geun-hye added for political flavor). Although the parade was predominately to celebrate 20 years of Chingusai, there were also marchers wearing yellow hats in support of bereaved families calling for a special law to independently investigate the cause of the Sewol Ferry incident in April

Around two or three hundred people showed up to the parade and marched with rainbow flags and signs distributed by Chingusai. A pair was dressed up as gold aliens and a beautiful drag queen Superwoman gave the parade a nice bit of camp. Spectators lined the street as we marched around the block and while onlookers mostly had bemused expressions, a few joined in on our cheer.


However, not every spectator had nice things to say. In a similar manner to the disruptions caused by Christianprotestors in June’s pride parade, around ten or twenty counter-protestors arrived screaming about how our sins will send us to hell. One woman in particular channeled the spirt of Shirley Phelps as she continued to yell in both English and Korean 'Shut up!' for a good ten minutes straight. 
Homosexuality is personal ruin and
the crime that is ruining the nation.
AIDS is hell's judgement
Halting children's birth

Chingusai ended the night with discussions on its past and future and presented Hong Seok-cheon with a human rights award for his bravery since coming out publicly in 2000. Although the protestors continued their anti-gay rhetoric on the sidelines, their voices were drowned out by music, speeches, and conversation. The night ended with a gay Korean tradition: drinks and discussions in Jongno's pojangmacha (food tents). While Jongno is typically not known as a gay mecca to the straight majority, that night rainbow streamers on the pojangmacha reflected the pride of the parade's participants. Although the gay rights movement still has a long way to go, Chingusai's work in the past twenty years has surely contributed to modern Korea's ever expanding positive attitude toward sexual minorities. 



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Should the US Retrench from South Korea, part 1: Yes

Koreabridge - Mon, 2014-09-01 04:29
Should the US Retrench from South Korea, part 1: Yes

This is a re-up of a debate couplet on the US position in South Korea, which I wrote for the Lowy Institute. Part one, the reasons for US retrenchment, is here (and below); part 2, the arguments against a US departure, is here. And that pic is me and my North Korean minder at the North Korea side of the DMZ. Note the KWP pin above his breast pocket.

Whether the US should stay or go is a perennial issue, that surprisingly, doesn’t get discussed much. This is probably because if you really supported a US withdrawal, you would not be taken seriously in much of US or Korean foreign policy establishments. US foreign policy is dominated by a hawkish, interventionist consensus of neocons and liberal internationalists for whom the US positions in Japan and Korea have become ends in themselves as symbols of US hegemony (in neocon-speak, that’s read as: ‘global basing means we’re f****** awesome!’). In tandem, the Korean discussion, for all its lazy anti-Americanism, assumes a permanent American presence to the point of irresponsibility. But all this misses the real hole at the center – the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the North Korean conventional threat (and before you say, ‘heh wait, they could blow up Seoul,’ recall that South Korea easily has the resources to ramp up in a big way; it just doesn’t do it).

The essay starts after the jump:

 

“Over at War on the Rocks, Christopher Lee, a former officer in the US Forces Korea (USFK), and Tom Nichols of the US Naval War College, have gotten into a useful debate on whether US forces should remain in Korea. This issue is not widely discussed – surprisingly, given the end of the Cold War and the huge margin of advantage in South Korea’s favor. Although I have taught international relations in South Korea for six years, this idea is almost never mooted in academia or the media here, so I applaud War on the Rocks for broaching it. But I think Lee and Tom (full disclosure: Tom Nichols and I are friends) have missed the strongest arguments for a pull-out. Specifically, I think Lee understates his case and Tom will have to work harder to justify staying – although I think it can be done. Today, I want to lay out a more robust case for departure; tomorrow I will lay out the counterargument. In brief, I think that the case for staying just barely clears the bar and that the tide is running against it.

Why could/should the US leave South Korea:

1. South Korea is free-riding. It only ‘needs’ the US, because it is doing less than it would otherwise.

Free-riding is controversial issue, one that has bedeviled all US alliances for many decades. An entire literature within international relations is built around the curious dynamics, such as ‘buck-passing’ or ‘reckless driving,’ that characterize allies’ efforts to shift burdens to other allies, or tie others unwittingly to their own national preferences. The most acute free-riding problem in the US alliance structure is in Europe. NATO informally benchmarks 2% of GDP as a minimum for members’ defense spending. Yet only four NATO states break that marker. This has systematically crippled NATO, forcing the US to take the lead on should-be-European contingencies such as the Balkans wars, Libya, and the Ukraine. Japan is even worse at less than one percent of GDP.

By contrast, South Korea spends 2.6% of GDP on defense. This sounds better, but unfortunately is far from enough given its security environment – the massive garrison state of North Korea sitting right on top of it. There is no formal spending target – USFK places no such demand on Seoul – but the number I hear widely thrown around is that without the US, South Korea would spend two or three times as much as it does on defense now. Every foreign security analyst I know in Korea thinks the RoK needs to spend a great deal more: South Korea has significantly under-invested in C4ISR, missile defense, and counter-insurgency tactics. It is woefully under-prepared to occupy North Korea. It does not draft women, despite a declining birth-rate that is leading to a major shrinkage in the ground force. With a GDP twenty-five to thirty times that of North Korea, and a population more than twice as large, South Korea has the room to make a far greater effort. Where Lee and Nichols spar over the small amount of money the US contributes to Southern defense, the real issue is getting South Korea to take its own defense far more seriously.

2. The US presence in Korea (and Japan) discourages Japan-South Korea rapprochement.

I have written about this issue several times (here and here). In brief, the US alliance almost certainly inhibits much needed cooperation between Japan and Korea on regional issues, most obviously China and North Korea. Specifically, the US alliance permits ‘moral hazard’ in both: neither Tokyo nor Seoul suffer any consequences for ridiculous criticisms of the other, because the US insures them both against the consequences. Hence Japan, and Korea especially, focus far too much attention on each other, and not nearly enough on the real regional threats. There is a great deal of agonizing in the US over how to get these two allies to bury the hatchet and start working together, but no one wants to admit the obvious solution – a genuine threat of abandonment. Hawks will disagree, and there are indeed downsides to abandonment, but let’s stop pretending that US regional alliances don’t have costs, such as this, either.

3. USFK’s presence ideologically props up North Korea.

One point that neither Lee nor Tom brought up is the obvious propaganda boon to North Korea of the US peninsular presence. Overlooking this is not uncommon. Most researchers on the North tend to assume that its ideology is a lot of empty talk, bunk to fill the airwaves, demonize Seoul, and so on. It is just a smokescreen over a degenerate, gangster-ocracy whose real ‘ideology’ is living the high life and hanging onto power by any means necessary. While the elite’s emptiness and cynicism is certainly clear, I think this is too easy. My own sense though – perhaps from having visited North Korea and been bombarded relentlessly there with ideology – is that ideology is actually very important. North Koreans are expected to attend ideology training ‘classes’ at least once a week, and more often for officials and higher-ups. The (North) Korean Central News Agency and the three newspapers of Pyongyang exert tremendous ‘intellectual’ effort on ideological reinforcement. The focus of that ideology, particularly since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of communism, is anti-colonial nationalism, in which the United States has taken the place of the Japanese invader, and South Korea is the bastardized, globalized ‘Yankee Colony.’ An imminent American invasion symbolized by USFK is the primacy explanation of the regime to its people for their privation and the permanent national security emergency. Take that justification away, and North Korea loses its primary raison d’etre. If South Korea is no longer ‘occupied,’ then why does North Korea need to exist at all?

4. USFK’s persistence keeps China from cutting North Korea loose, which would accelerate Pyongyang’s collapse.

In the same way that USFK perversely acts as an ideological crutch for Pyongyang, so does it act as a reason for Beijing to endlessly prevaricate on North Korean bad behavior and unification. China is formally committed to Korean unification, but in practice this is a lie. Instead, the Chinese openly refer to North Korea as a ‘buffer’ between them and the robust democracies of South Korea, Japan, and the United States. Personally, I detest this logic; it suggests a breath-taking cynicism about the catastrophic human rights condition of North Korea. That China would callously instrumentalize a state that the UN recently likened to Nazi Germany is just appalling (and goes a long way to explaining way so few in Asia trust China). But that is the situation. However, were the US to retrench from South Korea, the Chinese fear of USFK on its doorstep would be alleviated. Indeed, South Korea could swap a USFK exit plus a promise of post-unification neutrality for a Chinese cut-off of aid to North Korea and pressure for unification. Hawks in the US and South Korea might not like that, but alleviating the extraordinary suffering of the North Koreans should be our primary goal here. If a USFK departure, tied to a major Chinese policy shift, could bring that about, it should be considered.

5. US is not an empire. Where it can retrench, it should. Commitments should not last indefinitely.

This is an openly normative argument. If one embraces a full-throated version of US hegemony – militarized, globalized, interventionist – then this will not appeal. But post-Iraq, there is clear public desire to rein in American interventions, and the normative case for restraint, on liberal democratic grounds, is strong. The costs of hegemony – not just financial, but the regular war-making and killing of foreigners; a sprawling, hugely intrusive national security state; domestic nativism; torture, indefinite detention, rendition, and similar penal abuses – suggest that retrenchment would be good for American democracy and liberalism. Allies may not like that. They will complain of abandonment. But sacrificing America’s liberal ideals at home to promote them abroad is strange brew. It is increasingly obvious that hegemony abroad is deleterious to American liberalism at home. Where allies can stand on their own, as South Korea very obviously can, US retrenchment would be domestically healthy.”


Filed under: Hegemony, Korea (North), Korea (South), United States

Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University
robertkelly260@hotmail.com

 

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Seoul's Video Game Alley

Koreabridge - Mon, 2014-09-01 02:11
Seoul's Video Game Alley in

Attention Gamers: IF you haven’t been to Video Game Alley yet- RUN THERE! Game consoles from every generation and games can be found here!

Happy Market Monday! We’re back after a month of travel (videos and posts coming soon)!! Yesterday I headed back to the Electronics Market in Yongsan to purchase a card reader. Before heading that way I stopped in at a friends house. His beloved Xbox 360 had just stopped working so we decided to check out Video Game Alley and see if we could find him a new power brick. The unfortunate state of his Xbox lead us to explore another interesting specialty market in Seoul!

 

Many Games to choose from at Video Game Alley

Video Game Alley is located directly past the electronics market. If you walk through the tunnel continue straight. You will see a giant PlayStation poster on your left hand side. Directly underneath it are some stairs with a red sign. Walk in and the down to the basement.

 

Nearly every gaming console that has ever been in existence can be found in the Alley with hundreds of games and accessories. I relived my childhood as I found a TV hooked up with Super Nintendo and played a few levels of Mario Brothers while a girl next to me used the gun accessory to play duck hunt.

Seoul, Korea

 

We were instantly able to find the Power Brick, along with several other models for other Xbox 360s, that we needed. The vendor that sold it to us was very helpful. Prior to coming we took a picture of the label and he made sure that the voltage was correct and it was the exact power cord we needed. The vendor was able to read our picture to determine the precise model required.

 

They also sold a number of bargain bin xbox 360/playstation games, including recent releases for only 9,800 won. Xbox 1 releases in Korea next month.

 

If you are into Video games I highly recommend making this trip!

 

Directions: Sinyongsan Station (Exit 5)

Walk straight through the underground tunnel, just to the north of Ipark Mall.

50m past the tunnel you will see a giant PlayStation billboard on your left.

Look for the Red sign underneath and go down the stairs into Video Game Alley


 

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