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Teachers Teaching Teachers Playlist

EdTechTalk - Sun, 2017-11-19 04:13

While things have gotten a bit quiet on the the EdTechTalk site, Teachers Teaching Teachers continues to have great conversations Wednesday nights at 8pm EST (global times). Below is a playlist of recent episodes.  
Tune in at: http://edtechtalk.com/ttt
 

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Educational Technology and Education Conferences for January to June 2018, Edition #38

EdTechTalk - 10 hours 4 min ago

Educational Technology and Education Conferences

for January to June 2018, Edition #38

Prepared by Clayton R. Wright, crwr77 at gmail.com, November 12, 2017

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Remembering Jen

Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-11-11 13:05
Remembering Jen


 

Jen Sotham was a vibrant part of the Busan community.  She was a vibrant part of any community she encountered.  Jen wrote. Jen sang. Jen danced. Jen filmed.  Jen taught. Jen laughed. Jen spoke from the heart and listened from there as well.  Jen touched so many lives. Jen died this week after a long, amazingly shared battle life with cancer.  Those of us who knew her already knew that she was awesome.  I don't think we realized how much she was going to teach us (and so many others) after she left.

Whether you're someone who got to know her in person or someone who will get to know her through the online and offline legacy she leaves behind, Jen's life is one worth celebrating. So, lift that glass a little higher, sing that song a little louder, and hug that person a little tighter.... To Jen!

- Jeff from:  lucywalkerfilm
Ineffably beautiful to be holding Jen’s hand & head as she peacefully died last night. Awe and privilege and radiance to witness. Too many too intense thoughts for here. Love and prayers to her wonderful family and friends. Even her doctors and nurses so touched by her and devastated. Gratitude and reverence for her peace and acceptance as she made her transition despite its fearsome challenges. Her grace was shocking even as it was tested to the core. Thanks too to @thewinsomebrown and @claudearp for emergency middle of the night spirits and quotings of Joyce and Hopkins. Worlds of wanwood leafmeal. The Dead. We are working on getting Jen’s TED talk from #tedxvenicebeach uploaded asap for those of you asking about that. And mostly and always and of course just love to my friend and inspiration and collaborator Jen Sotham all the way to her last breath and heartbeat and beyond 


We'd like to maintain an archive of Jen's stuff here.  Please comment or email any links or thoughts.

Jen Online

From Jen vs. Cancer

Creative Works

Social Media

Jen at TEDxVenice Beach


Jen @ Wordz Only #2 (Feb. 20, 2010)


Jen Sotham @ Wordz Only#6 (October 22, 2010)


Jen Sotham at The 2012 Acoustic Showdown


"Logistics" - A Romantic Short Film by Jen Sotham


Jen Sotham - "Logistics" Interview

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This Week: Cocktail Fest, Reopened Greenhouse, & More

Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-11-11 02:35
This Week: Cocktail Fest, Reopened Greenhouse, & More

Alright. I’m a shit blogger. But as I mentioned in the last post, I am a really well-informed shit blogger these days, and while I’m trawling through countless articles to look for material for work, I’m constantly saving articles, too, that I have a personal interest in and mean to come back to at some point. That point is usually Sunday, when I should be getting work done to make the week run more smoothly. So I thought, while I’m at it, at least I can make myself useful (is that what this is?) and do a kind of round-up on Fridays/Saturdays in the weird witching hours between finishing one week’s work and starting the next week’s.

And what a week it has been my friends. I’m going to try to bring some order to the chaos, but this will probably be an evolving format for a while (or this will be the only time this kind of post ever happens — life is full of mystery).

In Korea

  • Trump came, blah blah blah. Let’s not talk about that. It’s over now, and there were no major international incidents, so let’s just move on.
  • Now, who could use a nice, stiff drink? The Cheongdam Cocktail Festival started last Thursday and will be going on until the 22nd. You can get up to 60% discounts on drinks and bar food at places like Mixology, Lupin and Alice. These are some of the best cocktails Korea has to offer, but they are pricey, so it’s a good chance to try some of these places out at a fraction of the normal price.
  • Also related, if you’re feeling like you’re living in a somewhat Lynchian world of late, there’s a film festival for that. Seoul Art Cinema will be showing David Lynch’s films from November 15 to November 26.
  • The Joongang Ilbo has published an interesting profile of literary critic and writer Hwang Hyun-san. He explains that growing up on a remote island meant that he learned a dialectical Korean that influenced his interest in words and language.
  • And of course, the new Michelin Seoul guide is out. There’s a lot of drama going on with this guide, but it’s not as unique to Korea as some people seem to think. Chefs have been giving back their stars for a while now, for a variety of reasons, and of course the guide is tied up in politics and nepotism all over the world. Why else would it have taken them this long to even get to Korea?
  • And finally, the Daeonsil Greenhouse has reopened at Changgyeonggung Palace. I didn’t know about the greenhouse until about a year ago, but it’s been closed for renovation for about 15 months. I’ll definitely be stopping in soon to check it out. One of my main goals in life is to be set up enough to have a greenhouse, and probably also someone to take care of the plants in said greenhouse, because despite my sharecropper roots, I kill most things left in my care (that don’t have four legs…. my zoo of pets are fine, don’t worry).

In the World

So there’s the world according to me for this week. Eventually I will quell the rising storm of work assignments and bake something or go somewhere. Until then.

The post This Week: November 6-12 appeared first on Follow the River North.

Follow the River North
Followtherivernorth.com

Freelance writer and editor. American in Seoul. I write about Korean food. I blog about all food. Last year I wrote a monthly column about traveling to different places around the country to explore Korean ingredients and cuisine. This ignited my interest in local foods and cooking, which I blog about regularly now. I also blog restaurant and cafe recommendations, recipes and some background and history about Korean food.

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Books & Stuff    Cafés & Shops     Korean Food & Ingredients      Personal     Recipes       Restaurants & Bars

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Top 5 Night Markets in Seoul

Koreabridge - Tue, 2017-11-07 00:00
Top 5 Night Markets in Seoul

One thing you must have heard of Seoul by now is that it’s a city that operates around the clock, even if it’s public transportation doesn’t. Many people take this chance to stay out all night enjoying the various clubbing and drinking opportunities, but every once in awhile, it is also fun to check out a night market in Seoul.

Have you yet visited a Seoul night market? If not, here are a few night markets in Seoul highly recommended by us for you to check out!

 

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#1 DONGDAEMUN NIGHT MARKET

If your shopping buds are still tickling by the time the clock hits 10p.m, head on over to Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station, which boasts several tall buildings all there to serve your shopping needs. Floor after floor after floor you’ll find women’s clothes, men’s clothes, shoes, bags, other kinds of accessories, and even food. Be sure to brush up on asking “how much” in Korean. Then load up your wallet with cash and be prepared to haggle your way to cheaper prices! And that’s not even where it ends!

Outside, by Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station’s exit 4 and under the bright yellow tents, you can find different kinds of items ranging from clothes to leathery goods to accessories to satisfy your shopping itch. There are also wholesale options by exit 2 of Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station. Be sure to also take a break between your shopping expeditions to indulge in the tasty food options available!

Tucked away inside the area is also a theme park ride called Disco Pang-Pang, which we bet you’ll love too. Just be sure not to eat right before you ride!

 

#2 NAMDAEMUN NIGHT MARKET

This market is located conveniently in the middle of the city, open both day and night. From 10pm until 5am the next morning, you can browse around its night market, which is one of the most famous ones in Seoul. You can find just about anything your heart desires at this market, including amazing food to wash down with some drinks.

However, take into account that some vendors might operate on their own schedule, instead of the regular 10pm to 5am, and that a lot of shops close on Sundays. Also take into account that not all the shopping opportunities are located outdoors – there are also shopping centers such as the Sungyemun Imported Goods Shopping Centre from where you can find more goods to shop for.

 

#3 GWANGJANG MARKET

Having been established in 1905, Gwangjang Market is Seoul’s oldest market. As it is located close by to Dongdaemun, you may even check out both of them in the same night!

This market is known for selling hanbok, the traditional Korean clothing, but its best part is perhaps the street level. Here, fabric shops and food stalls come together to offer you the best of both worlds in one fell swoop. If there’s one place where you’ll definitely want to explore all the Korean street food available, it’s right here! The best part is, it’s open all night!

 

#4 BAMDOKKAEBI NIGHT MARKET (밤도깨비 야시장, bamdokkaebi yasijang)

Although this night market was originally opened in just one location in Yeouido, it has since expanded to four locations around the city. On some Fridays and Saturdays, between March and October, you can find this market at one of its different locations: Yeouido, Dongdaemun Design Plaza, Mokdong Stadium and Cheonggye Plaza. And with a different location comes a different atmosphere and experience for the night market.

At Yeouido, you can find a traditional and cultural experience, with not only lots of food on offer, but traditional performances from different corners of the world to be enjoyed as well. You can also find Korean handicrafts for purchase.

In contrast, Dongdaemun Design Plaza’s night market is more modernly vibrant. You’ll find a great mix of food, handmade items, and even fashion and dance shows. The younger crowd especially loves visiting this night market.

If you visit the one at Mokdong Stadium, you’ll find a very sports themed night market. Here locals can buy and sell different kinds of sports equipment, and even get their broken sports items repaired. In addition, you can view showings of extreme sports, all the while munching on healthy and tasty food.

Lastly, Cheonggye Plaza’s market is offered in May, July and September, all of which offer a different season of foods, handicrafts, and performances. It is especially great if you’re going with your family.

 

#5 MYEONGDONG NIGHT MARKET

While not a traditional night market, as in it is open in the evening rather than at night, checking out Myeongdong is definitely worth the trip. Not only are the two biggest department stores – Lotte and Shinsegae – located right by the area, the streets are filled with clothing stores, ranging from small Korean shops to big international brands such as H&M and Forever21.

And what if you get hungry? No problem! There are several food stalls spread across the streets of Myeongdong to get your tummy full of yummy. In addition to the food vendors, there are also tons of restaurants in the area to soothe your dining needs, even after the shops have already closed for the night.

Next time you’re planning a night out, you just might want to add a night market in Seoul to your plan as well. If you are feeling inspired by all this talk of Korea to test your Korean language skills, you can try our 90 Minute Korean Alphabet Challenge!

 

What’s your favorite night market in Seoul? Any great food stall or souvenir recommendations? Please share with us in the comments below!

 

Photo Credit: BigStockPhoto

The post Top 5 Night Markets in Seoul appeared first on 90 Day Korean.

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Korea This Week: Gordon Ramsay Shills for Cass, Zainichi Woes, Sino-Korean Ties Thaw

Koreabridge - Mon, 2017-11-06 06:26
Korea This Week: Ramsay shills for Cass, Zainichi woes, Sino-Korean

 

Gordon Ramsay Shills for Cass

In a new commercial for Cass beer, pitchman and respected chef and restaurateur Gordon Ramsay takes a large swallow of beer, grimaces in ostensible pleasure, and proclaims it to be “bloody fresh!” The commercial is hoped to raise the international profile of Cass beer, though, as it enlists a chef renowned for his attention to quality to shill for the Korean equivalent of Budweiser, the ad has also noticeably lowered the foreign beer-drinking public’s estimation of Ramsay’s ability to credibly rate beer.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that local beer enthusiasts found Ramsay’s praise hard to swallow, as many local critics’ one-word reviews of Cass, Hite, and other mass-market Korean brews tend to rhyme with the name of the beer. For the record, I don’t think an ice-cold Cass is terrible; but I do think that in the year 2017 one could easily pluck a better beer from any convenience store cooler, blindfolded, 19 times out of twenty (the one miss being a Cass).

That Ramsay made this commercial during a time when the Korean craft beer scene is exploding makes it more remarkable. Before good craft beers became widely available, going to a high-end meat joint in Korea inevitably meant pairing your Hanwoo or pork belly with a sub-par beer, a sad but unavoidable fact that is somewhat analogous to going to a New York steakhouse and pairing a filet mignon with a Miller High Life. With the appearance of many excellent craft brews in Korea in the past decade or so, limiting the menu to one or two mass-produced lagers has become much harder to justify.

To be fair to Mr. Ramsay, “bloody fresh” actually says very little about the beer itself. All beer is fresh at some point, and this quality in itself doesn’t distinguish it from literally any other beer in the world that was also recently brewed. Perhaps this semantic loophole (along with flipping great wads of cash) was how his conscience allowed him to do this? In addition to being “bloody fresh”, the primary virtue of Cass according to Ramsay is that is rinses the oil from your mouth, which, as die-hard Gordon Ramsay fans will happily note, is not a quality unique to Cass either – the same effect could just as easily be accomplished with water, mouthwash, or paint thinner.

Is that a “well played” for Mr. Ramsay, or has the shark been jumped? You decide.

China-Korea Relations to Thaw?

There was a bit of good news this week on the diplomatic front, as Chinese and South Korean relations show signs of thawing after a year-long chill.  

On Tuesday, the foreign ministries of China and South Korea released statements noting the importance of the bilateral relationship, and resolving to “expeditiously bring exchange and cooperation in all areas back on a normal development track” (from the South Korean Foreign Ministry statement).

The frosty relations between Seoul and Beijing were brought about by Chinese opposition to South Korea’s decision to deploy the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system, which South Korea deemed important in defending against North Korean attack, but which China viewed as giving the US early warning advantages and the ability to peer into Chinese airspace. The row resulted in a series of unofficial sanctions from Beijing that had severe effects on several Korean industries, from cosmetics and fashion to tourism to pop culture.

South Korean guides assist a Chinese tourist in Seoul.

The “Korea Bubble” in Japan

I recently came across this excellent short documentary on the challenges and controversy surrounding the Chongryon (aka “Chosen Soren” in Japanese) – the association of 3rd and 4th-generation Koreans living in Japan who maintain links with and allegiance to North Korea. 

The mini-doc discusses the historical background and context of the 150,000-strong group of Zainichi Koreans, and explains how they ended up in Japan, why so many identify with a country they were not born in and, in many cases, have never been to (ie. North Korea), and the problems they face today in light of current tensions between Japan and North Korea. 

The video is part of the Vox Borders series, which “investigates the human stories behind the lines on a map”, and is a much better use of thirteen minutes than, say, drinking a Cass Fresh.

A Zainichi Korean student attends a Korean high school class in Tokyo.

And how was your week?

 

 

John Bocskay is the author of Culture Shock! Korea: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette (2017, Marshall Cavendish), available at Amazon.uk, The Book Depository, What the Book, and anywhere fine books are sold.

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Is Trump Baiting Kim Jong Un?

Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-11-04 08:18
Is Trump Baiting Kim Jong Un?

 

 

This is a local re-post of something I wrote a few weeks ago for The National Interest. It pivots off of the argument I made last month as well, that this is the weirdest North Korean crisis ever. Not necessarily the most dangerous – the ax-murder incident might still be at the top – but rather the strangest. And you thought Dennis Rodman was the weirdest low the North Korean debate could hit. How wrong you were.

The reason of course is Trump’s mad ad-libbing over these last months, and his downright bizarre commentary in general about east Asia. It’s worth remembering that his frightening comments like ‘fire and fury’ and ‘totally destroy’ were just thrown out off the cuff with no vetting by Trumps’ natsec team. So we’re backing into a war because Trump does not how to take direction from experts. John Kelly tried to ground him and Trump, like some petulant teenager, won’t have it – purposefully ignores his staff recommendations just to spite them. Surreal…

The full essay follows the jump.

 

 

This arguably the strangest North Korea crisis ever. The conventional wisdom is that it is the most dangerous yet. But the risks of military action are well-known and enormous, so kinetic options are still rather unlikely. Instead, what strikes me the most about this time around is the interventions of the American president. Not only have President Trump’s comments worsened tension rather than soothed it, they are often made in an off-the-cuff, gleefully belligerent manner. This combination creates the bizarre outcome of a US president mixing the frightening (threats of nuclear war) with the comedic (it is all just Trump being Trump, the boyish bomb-thrower). This peculiar disjuncture of the ultra-serious and the childish is so unnerving and weird that it is firing much of the social media debate about this particular crisis. Once again, as so often with Trump, the whole thing is becoming about him rather than events themselves.

It is genuinely hard to know what to make of this, of just how close we are to serious conflict. Usually the American president plays a calming role regarding North Korea, because it is an extremely dangerous state with a long history of provocation and gangsterism. President Bill Clinton tried to normalize it and pull it into the post-Cold War world (however haltingly) through the Agreed Framework and a visit by the US Secretary of State at the time (Madeline Albright). Barack Obama was famously cool, letting even North Korea’s racism bounce off. (The North Korean Central News Agency [KCNA] referred to him as a monkey.) Even George W. Bush who provocatively placed North Korea on the ‘Axis of Evil’ in 2002 eventually came around to dealing with Pyongyang in the Six Party Talks in his second term. At no point did Trump’s three predecessors speak as explosively as Trump is doing. Indeed, it seems like Trump is talking as KCNA does. Trash talk for trash talk. This has been Secretary of State Tillerson’s defense of the president’s language.

As I have suggested elsewhere, there seem to be five possible explanations for Trump’s unique rhetoric. How this crisis unfolds in the next six months – it seems primed to roll on for awhile yet – will depend on why exactly Trump is talking about North Korea in a way no US president ever has before:

1. Trump Means It, but as a Wheeler-and-Dealer He Really Wants a Deal

This is what the Trump administration would have us believe: All the psychological explanations are wrong. The president simply means what he says. Trump is at the end of his rope. Previous presidents have buck-passed this issue until it landed on his desk, and now he must take action. If this is true, Trump is almost certainly bluffing in search of a deal and hoping his bluff will not be called. If he is actually rational in talking this way, i.e., if he genuinely means it, then he is also rational enough to understand just how great the risk of war is and does not want one. This is Trump as he likes to present himself – the tough negotiator willing to go to the brink to get a good deal.

2. Trump is Baiting the North into a Casus Belli Provocation

This is the most frightening possibility. Here the reason for Trump’s outlandish threats is to bait North Korean leader Kim Jong Un into some kind of extreme provocation which could serve as justification for US military action. If so, then Trump has already decided that conflict is either inevitable or that it is preferable to a worsening future. There is a logic here: North Korea is a dangerous nuclear weapons state today which will be an even more dangerous nuclear weapons state tomorrow, so it is better to fight today than tomorrow. A similar logic is sometimes used to explain Germany’s decision to fight in 1914, for example. Time was on the side of the Russians, and it was better to fight them sooner than later.

3. Trump is Pushing Back on His Own Staff

This is a domestic politics interpretation, popular on cable news with its intense interest in the staffing ups-and-downs of the administration. Trump is simply acting out. He clearly dislikes being told what to do by his staff, especially Chief of Staff John Kelly. He instinctively resents any outside direction and enjoys being a bomb-thrower. This explains why he keeps ad-libbing explosive, unnecessary commentary like ‘fire and fury’ or ‘totally destroy’ North Korea. He is pushing back against Kelly and his own staff who have warned not to speak this way.

4. Trump is Diverting Attention from His Mounting Scandals

This is another cable news-domestic politics explanation, especially popular on the political left. Trump is flirting with a diversionary war. Particularly Robert Mueller’s investigation into Trump’s Russia links is accelerating, with the looming indictment of Paul Manafort. This seems like the most cynical of all hypotheses, but it also has the promise of easy change. If Trump is as innocent as he say he is, there is no need to change the subject to North Korea.

5. Trump is Simply Overwhelmed by the Office and Says Whatever Comes to Mind.

One might call this the Daniel Drezner theory of Trump’s behavior. Drezner, a political scientist who writes at The Washington Post, has repeatedly argued that Trump’s administration is characterized by an amateurishness that cripples it widely. In my experience in Korea, this argument is locally persuasive. Many of my acquaintances here worry that Trump is simply mentally unhinged.

The most alarming of these is #2, that Trump actually believes a war is more or less inevitable. The others suggest that much of the crisis is artificial, ginned up by Trump’s own language for other reasons. The worry is that the more Trump talks, the more he is talking himself, and Kim Jong Un, into a corner, where they feel must act. Even if he is not baiting Kim Jong Un – and it becomes harder and harder to avoid that conclusion with every new tweet – it may happen anyway. We are sliding toward a self-fulfilling prophecy.


Filed under: Korea (North), Nuclear Weapons, The National Interest, Trump

Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University

@Robert_E_Kelly

 

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DE POCO UN TODO. 31 Octubre de 2017. Taller de radio ViaRadio. Colegio Sta. Mª del Naranco Alter Via. Oviedo. Asturias. España

Puentes al Mundo - Fri, 2017-11-03 02:19

24:55 minutes (22.82 MB)

Programa Magacín de 30 minutos. Con Ismael Alba, Cassandra Fernández, Iván Rubio, María Suárez, Álvaro Díaz y Macarena Peri. Coordinación de Nacho Matías.

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Korea This Week: K-drama remake, airport plastic surgery, and a new penis taboo

Koreabridge - Tue, 2017-10-31 06:07
Korea This Week: K-drama remake, airport plastic surgery, and a new pe Coffee, Newspaper, and a Face Lift?

One of the things I love about Korea is how fast you can get certain things done. Repairmen often come the day you call them. Products ordered online cross the country in a day or two. Fried chicken is rushed to your door by a motorbike driver with a loose interpretation of traffic laws.

The list goes on, but a plan by Incheon International airport to open a plastic surgery clinic seems to have pushed the quick service concept a bit too far. The idea was to open the clinic in the transfer area, so that patients could receive treatment without having to pass through immigration and officially enter the country.

The plan has recently encountered some turbulence from Korean medical industry organizations, who have raised the rather excellent question of what would happen in cases where patients were not able to fly soon after their procedures, and it was further hampered by a lack of doctors willing to move in to the space designated for the clinic.

No word yet from prospective patients on whether they would consider doing something like this, but it doesn’t seem likely to fly.

When boarding an airplane, it is also helpful to resemble the person in your passport photo The Good Remake

An American remake of the Korean drama The Good Doctor recently edged The Big Bang Theory as the most-watched Monday drama in the US. The new series, which focuses on a young autistic doctor with Savant Syndrome, has been extended to a full season of episodes.

The Good Doctor is only the second Korean drama given a remake by American producers, and is arguably the first one to show promise. The first K-drama remake, ABC’s Somewhere Between (based on the K-drama “God’s Gift”), failed to garner high ratings, but has yet to be cancelled or renewed for a second season.

Hollywood has long been mining Korean cinema, with mixed results. Spike Lee’s remake of Park Chan-wook’s masterpiece Old Boy was one notable flop. This 2013 piece in the Guardian notes some of the reasons why they often fall short.

Freddie Highmore plays Dr. Shaun Murphy, a surgeon with autism and Savant Syndrome in The Good DoctorThis Headline is a Grabber

Aaaaand the headline of the week belongs to this article in the Jeju Weekly titled “Touching a Boy’s Penis Was Once Part of the Korean Culture, But Now It Became a Crime”.

The piece refers to the once-common practice of mostly older Korean folks touching a young boy’s penis in an innocent way, perhaps (admittedly very roughly) analogous to the Western practice of tousling a kids’ hair, and how it is now considered to be unacceptable to younger generations, who are more likely to be taught that such contact, even if intended innocently, is always inappropriate.

Several people have run afoul of these new norms, including a guest on the show Running Man, who grabbed actor Choi Min-yong’s frank and beans during a playful wrestling match.

The article also refers to the rapidly disappearing practice of commissioning full-frontal portraits of male babies. Having a baby boy in Korea was for a long time a very big deal; so much so that the parents would shoot the baby’s first portrait with the proof his gender visible, front-and-center. There was one such portrait on display in the window of a photo shop I used to walk by every day in my old neighborhood – a small but pointed reminder that Korea was different from the place I had left.

A completely gratuitous photo of small weiners

And how was your week?

 

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Defector Stories (KoreaFix Book Review)

Koreabridge - Thu, 2017-10-26 02:20
Defector Stories (KoreaFix Book Review)

 

Book Review
The Aquariums of Pyongyang (2000), by Chol-hwan Kang and Pierre Rigoulot
Nothing to Envy:  Real Lives in North Korea (2009), by Barbara Demick

There are a lot of North Korean defectors’ accounts floating around these days. It’s become a bit of a cottage industry. There are books, lecture tours, even South Korean TV interview shows featuring North Korean women who (huge surprise) are all quite attractive. It’s both truly unfortunate and totally predictable that some defectors have been accused of embellishing or falsifying their accounts in order to create a more dramatic and hence more lucrative sob story for the TV cameras, publishers, and U.N. subcommittees. Of course, Pyongyang would have you believe that ALL defectors are doing this, so it bothers me when Korean leftists seem a little too quick to seize on defector claims that have been shown to be all or partially bogus.  It reminds me of how conservatives bring up “welfare queen” stories during any discussion of poverty and racism in America. What are you really trying to say, man?

“Aquariums” starts with probably the worst family decision in the history of family decisions.

Of course, any journalist dealing with defectors should exercise proper skepticism and due diligence and try as much as possible to verify stories (which can range from extremely difficult to totally impossible). However, it’s long been clear that these defectors’ tales link up, reference and corroborate each other, creating an undeniable picture of fear, starvation, brutality, and repression. Two such books are The Aquariums of Pyongyang and Nothing to Envy, which remain as arguably the two best defector books that you can read.

Aquariums starts with probably the worst family decision in the history of family decisions. Kang, whose family story makes up the entirety of the book, was actually born in Japan and part of a prosperous zainichiKorean family. The grandmother became a devoted communist, and convinced the grandfather to move the whole family back to North Korea, believing that it was their patriotic duty. To be fair, the regime misled at best, and completely lied at worst, regarding how these Korean-Japanese would be treated and how much of their wealth they would be allowed to keep, which turned out to be approximately zero. The harshness of everyday life, the lack of freedom, and what soon became brutal discrimination due to their Japanese background crushed the spirits of the grandparents, who realized before long that they had brought their family to total ruination.

Much of the book is an account of life inside the Yodok concentration camp, where the whole family was sent due to the ideological crimes of the grandfather. Vivid depictions of torture, public executions, disease and starvation abound. Eventually, after the grandfather’s death, the family was released, and Kang was eventually able to escape to China and come to South Korea, free to tell one of the first detailed accounts of life inside the notorious prison camps of the North.

Nothing to Envy is different from Aquariums in that it follows the lives of six separate defectors, who all tell their stories mostly in their own voices, with occasional commentary from the author Barbara Demick, a former L.A. Times reporter. These six were not members of Pyongyang’s elite, but all former residents of the smaller city of Chongjin, a place Demick decided to focus on for this project as she felt these defectors’ lives would be more representative of the average North Korean.

While the stories about the repression and misery that forced them to flee are certainly compelling, what stands out are the quiet moments of beauty, human connection and compassion. One vivid scene involves Mi-ran and Jun-sang, a young couple who find that the pitch blackness of the electricity-less North Korean night perfect for rendezvous beyond the watchful eyes of parents as well as the authorities. Moments like this call to mind flowers springing up between the cracks in the pavement of empty parking lots for abandoned strip malls—hope amidst the bleakness.

As far as bleakness, nothing tops the story of Dr. Jong, a female doctor who finally flees at the height of the mid 90s famine after watching scores of people starve to death and facing starvation herself (when, it bears reminding, that the government was spending millions, if not billions, of dollars and their nascent nuclear weapons program). Reaching China, one of her first encounters with people on the other side of the Yalu comes when she comes upon a house with a dog chained up in the yard. Staring into the dog’s food bowl, she sees scraps of meat—and realizes the shattering truth that a dog in China is fed better than a doctor in North Korea.

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DE POCO UN TODO. 24 Octubre de 2017. Taller de radio ViaRadio. Colegio Sta. Mª del Naranco Alter Via. Oviedo. Asturias. Españ

Puentes al Mundo - Wed, 2017-10-25 19:42

25:04 minutes (22.95 MB)

Programa Magacín de 30 minutos. Con Ismael Alba, Cassandra Fernández, Iván Rubio, María Suárez, Álvaro Díaz y Macarena Peri. Coordinación de Nacho Matías.

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DE POCO UN TODO. 17 Octubre de 2017. Taller de radio ViaRadio. Colegio Sta. Mª del Naranco Alter Via. Oviedo. Asturias. España

Puentes al Mundo - Wed, 2017-10-25 19:06

28:49 minutes (26.38 MB)

Programa Magacín de 30 minutos. Con Ismael Alba, Cassandra Fernández, Iván Rubio, María Suárez, Álvaro Díaz y Macarena Peri. Coordinación de Nacho Matías.

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DE POCO UN TODO. 10 Octubre de 2017. Taller de radio ViaRadio. Colegio Sta. Mª del Naranco Alter Via. Oviedo. Asturias. España

Puentes al Mundo - Wed, 2017-10-25 18:30

17:31 minutes (16.04 MB)

Programa Magacín de 30 minutos. Con Ismael Alba, Cassandra Fernández, Iván Rubio, María Suárez, Álvaro Díaz y Macarena Peri. Coordinación de Nacho Matías.

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Annihilation without Representation: Do S Korea & Japan have a Veto over Action against N Korea?

Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-10-21 09:09
Annihilation without Representation: Do S Korea & Japan have a Veto?

This is a local re-post of an essay I wrote for The National Interest this month. The TNI editors gave it the very helpful title, “The True Danger of the North Korea Crisis: It Could Cost American Its Allies.” That is exactly right. If the US strikes North Korea without getting the consent of South Korea and Japan, they will exit the alliance. Why stay when your ally jeopardizes potentially millions of your citizens and doesn’t even get your permission? And this would have a huge demonstration effect on other US allies too. Now you know that Trump thinks you’re expendable. Why would you stay?

So to me, that is the big question going forward: Will Trump even bother to call the South Koreans and Japanese before he strikes? He couldn’t be bothered to appoint an ambassador to South Korea, and presidenting is pretty hard. So hey, why bother? Fox and Friends is on…

The full essay is below the jump:

 

 

 

Tough North Korea rhetoric from the US administration continues. Major South Korean media increasingly talk as if US airstrikes are likely, and the expert community seems increasingly resigned to them as well. Despite constant criticism of his incendiary language, US President Donald Trump continues to suggest that major action against North Korea is imminent – most recently by suggesting that we are now in a period of ‘calm before the storm.’

I have argued in these pages that such strikes would be an enormous risk. We do not know what the North’s redlines for retaliation against such a strike are. We do not know if the strikes would so unnerve the North’s elites that war was next, that they would respond with enormous force, possibly including nuclear weapons. An expert study of this scenario suggests appalling casualty numbers. We also do not know what China’s thresholds are for intervention. China is treaty-bound to help North Korea if it is attacked. It may not, but if a US airstrike against North Korea spirals into a major conflict, then the likelihood of Chinese intervention rises.

It is also worth noting that even if the Chinese and North Koreans do not respond to airstrikes, North Korea will almost certainly deploy human shields as soon as the bombs start to fall. And the North has so many targets that the US would like to hit, that any ‘airstrike’ would look a lot more like a major air campaign and not a quick ‘surgical strike,’ as in Syria earlier this year. An air campaign against sites with human shields means a high civilian death toll. The North Koreans will not make this easy for us at all.

White House officials, including most importantly Secretary of Defense James Mattis, continue to suggest that diplomacy is the preferred outcome. And there are options to continue to buy us time against the North Korean nuclear and missile programs: missile defense, sanctions, continuing to cajole China to push North Korea harder, and so on. Nevertheless, the pressure to something dramatic regarding North Korea is rising. If war is inevitable – it is not, but for the sake of the argument – it is better to fight now, before they have more weapons, and before those weapons can more evidently strike the continental United States. Even Kim Young-Sam, South Korea’s president at the time of the 1994 nuclear crisis, has apparently retrospectively regretted his decision not to strike then.

President Kim’s veto of the strike at the time blocked US action. This question is now returning as Trump raises the rhetorical heat on Pyongyang. And this time, it involves Japan too, as it is now in range in range of North Korean missiles, and likely nuclear missiles. Japan has already practiced civil defense drills. But if the US were today, as in 1994, to extend an, albeit unspoken, veto to South Korea, and now Japan too, war is unlikely. They do not want it.

Americans may feel incensed at having to get ‘permission’ from others to act. Trump particularly is unlikely to feel such commitments. And hawks may suggest that because North Korea can range the US, we are threatened too and therefore no longer require allied permission. Nevertheless there are strong national interest reasons, if not moral ones, to once again solicit allied approval.

First, it is South Koreans and Japanese who will bear the brunt of any North Korean retaliation for a US strike. Yes, North Korea can, perhaps, now strike the US homeland, but the North’s ability to devastate the US is significantly lower than its ability to damage South Korea and Japan. If we are going to drag South Korea and Japan, unwantedly, into a war that could result in hundreds of thousands, or even millions, of their casualties, plus irradiated blast zones, refugees, and the possibility of state collapse, we should at least get their permission. It would be staggeringly immoral, an astonishing act of callousness in American history, if US action led to nuclear use against South Korea and/or Japan without their permission. The British referred to this problem in the early Cold War as ‘annihilation without representation’ – the Americans might go to war with the Soviets over the heads of NATO, but the NATO states would be destroyed in the cross-fire.

Second, if this normative argument is unpersuasive, then consider the impact on US national interest if allies around the world saw the US sacrifice, or risk sacrificing, South Korea and Japan without even soliciting their approval. This would end pretensions that US hegemony is liberal or benign. It would destroy allied trust that the US considers their interests too. It would appear as if the US were using allies instrumentally as shields or buffers to absorb enemy fire. That is akin to why the Soviet Union did not leave eastern Europe in the late 1940s – to serve as a buffer against the West and a locus for the next war, rather than inside the USSR itself. This was yet one more reason for the Warsaw Pact states to exit the alliance as soon as they could. It is similarly likely that America’s alliance system would collapse if the US risks major, perhaps nuclear, conflict without allied consent but fought on their soil. Trump’s advisors likely realize this; does the president?


Filed under: Alliances, Japan, Korea (North), Korea (South), Media, The National Interest, Trump

Robert E Kelly
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science & Diplomacy
Pusan National University

@Robert_E_Kelly

 

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Genderfluid in Korea–Anonymous in an Uncertain World

Koreabridge - Fri, 2017-10-20 01:20
Genderfluid in Korea–Anonymous in an Uncertain World Read

 

The post Genderfluid in Korea–Anonymous in an Uncertain World appeared first on the3WM.
Editor’s note: The writer requested anonymity due to the sensitivity of the subject. Any responses can be sent to 3wmseoul@gmail.com

A Twitter post on my wall by a past admirer: “Guess this is why you ignored my advances!” A shared link to an article about the confessions of a genderfluid Korean teenager. An influx of tweets into my inbox. Tweets of disgust and hate and disappointment.

I wake up drenched in sweat. The dampness sends chills down my spine.

Then I remember that I don’t even have a Twitter account. Us digital kids and our digital nightmares.

It’s been nearly two years since I came out as genderfluid on this site. For the first few days after my story went up, I got high on the adrenaline from my first real rebellion, though I did request my anonymity. Later, as the views ticked up, I admit having felt a bit paranoid about the possibility of an accidental reveal.

Twenty-two months passed, and my life went on without anyone I know giving a darn. Guess that went better than I expected.

One impeached president and three nuke tests later, I can’t say things have changed for the better. Gay marriage is still illegal. Women’s Rights? LGBTQ awareness? Meh. At this point, I’m just hoping nothing’s deteriorating.

In a more personal sense, however, I suppose some aspects about me have changed — hairstyle, favorite movies, etc. — as it is for any other teen.

Some moments of stupidity, like that time when I, on one particularly depressed evening, tried to come out to my mother over the phone. I rambled on as if I were inebriated, struggling to put together proper sentences to describe how I consider my gender identity. “I… am not so sure… if I consider myself a…”

You would’ve thought I said, “Mama, I killed a man,” from her tone of disapproval. Her barrage of words prevented me from explaining further: You were born in an academic household without many hyper-feminine relatives. I myself don’t wear makeup, nor have I taught you to. I know you like boys, and you need to have very strong attraction towards girls to define yourself  as a transgender. Thus, you’re simply a confused tomboy, and…

Along with that connection to family came a phase of self-doubt about whether the fruit I bit into was of knowledge or deception. Was I really genderfluid or was it merely a series of acquired traditionally-masculine traits? Was I simply struggling to climb the social ladder by proving myself worthy in activities traditionally associated with both genders? Did I fundamentally seek to receive validation from the cutthroat patriarchal family members and to make up for my mother not having any sons?

With such questions in mind, I took time off from my own concerns to tune in to what the others have to say on the topic, observing society’s views while trying to dismiss my own personal experiences and feelings as a member of the LGBTQ community.

“LGBTQ is one of the roots of evil in society. To prevent confusion and inefficiency, they need to be educated in order to turn them back to the natural state,” one classmate claimed during a group discussion in sociology class. A few others said that they were “against” gay people. Thankfully, such strong antipathy is starting to be considered as extreme even in Korea, as I saw the jaws of some students drop incredulously. There were also generous opinions that showed unconditional support, though not from our Korean classroom:

“I can’t believe gay marriage is illegal in Korea,” a German teen said in disbelief when the matter was brought up for discussion among a group of international students participating in a templestay. Her enthusiastic support gave me a bit more hope for the future. “My goodness, are we not all equal beings deserving of the same rights?,” she continued. Oh, my dear friend, if only the future was as bright as you are.

However, I found that most students, especially in Korea, were somewhere in between–having doubt about the repressive old values, yet still afraid to look into themselves. Back in my high school classroom: “Perhaps the ‘girl crush’ that we talk about is an indicator of how most people are on the polar ends of the gender/sexuality spectrum,” another classmate boldly claim. Hearing that, I felt the shame of having generalized my peers as narrow-minded and conservative; my preconceptions might’ve caused my sense of isolation in terms of gender issues. But then, I still didn’t know anyone around me having the same identit…

“To tell you the truth, I don’t consider myself a girl,” a friend declares during a private chat.

Come again?

Life’s funny like that. Just as I was trying to stop focusing solely on my own gender identity, a friend reveals her experiences and the hardships she is going through (or zirs and ze, though the friend doesn’t care for pronouns). And through the confession, I see my own self still not telling anyone in real life, still filled with self-doubt that I’m try to bury under thoughts about anything other than myself.

“How do you see yourself, then?” I ask.

“Ummm… Neutral.”

“And you don’t see yourself at all as a girl?”

“Nope.”

I wanted to ask why not. But the words of my mother, resonated in my head: “Why can’t you see yourself as a tomboy?” Nor could I bring myself to say, “Me neither.” All that came out of my mouth were the words I wanted to hear, if I were to ever reveal the fluidity of my gender to someone I know in real life.

“Okay. It must’ve taken you some guts to tell me. Thanks for sharing. I hope you’re not hard on yourself because of what others define you as.”

Confession time. Even after talking with the friend, I still don’t plan on revealing my own gender to anyone in real life. The chances of my bringing up the topic during a family meal is almost nonexistent now. I have, however, learned to fear not the nightmares that had stemmed from paranoia and self-doubt because, after all the different opinions I’ve encountered, I’m sure some people would be on my side. Most importantly, I did nothing wrong. Yet I am reluctant when it comes to letting others know.

Such is life. Such is my life. No need for pity; I do show myself in every aspect. I try to get my voice heard. I break some traditional gender roles. Still, it will take much more time and stronger motivations to get me to proudly present the fluidity of my gender.

 

I’ve fantasized about my family replying to my “I’m genderfluid,” with benign nonchalance, as if what I said was of no more importance than my preference for strawberry ice cream over chocolate. Now I’m just living on a prayer that there will be a day when being a gender and/or sexual minority wouldn’t overpower other innumerable qualities people see in a human entity.

I also hope for more basic acceptance, not only for the LGBTQ but for all human identity, conditions and characteristics that are currently being misunderstood and blindly criticized. Until then, being the coward I am, the best I can do is to let my agony out through these written pieces and sometimes submit them under the cloak of anonymity.

Seeing many girls around me delve into the intricate world of cosmetics and replace meals with weight loss smoothies (which is an entirely different problem on its own) and, most notably, start dating adoring boys, I feel even more left out than before. While I am content being single for now, I worry about my future. What if the ones I’m attracted to see me as a mere pal than a partner? Would I get friendzoned because I don’t wear cosmetics in a nation where the “all-natural” look wouldn’t take an average-looking person very far? I take fair care of myself, but I do an awful job at coming across as “feminine.” And for many, my desire to wear the pants (though I am willing to share them) in the relationship would be a turn-off.

While finding love is hard for anyone, the potential of perpetual loneliness does scare me. And I’m more concerned that I would start denying or blaming my gender identity for problems in relationships, or the lack thereof.

In terms of other parts of my life, however, I’m fairly content. I can’t say fluidity is a blessing but it certainly isn’t a curse either. Plus, my rational self tells me that whether it be work or romance, it will be up to my own efforts to determine the course of events. With that in mind, I’ll continue my journey forward, uncertain about the effects my fluidity will have on my life and others. 

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    Accidental Island

    Koreabridge - Thu, 2017-10-19 02:34
    Accidental Island

    I had gotten on the wrong boat.

    I purchased a ticket to Binjindo—the most famous of the islands of Korea’s Hangryeo Marine National Park–but instead boarded a kind of a multi-island sea bus transporting the venerable inhabitants to the villages dotting a handful of the other islands, where they scratched out a living from farming, the odd bit of tourism, or whatever the sea managed to provide. And as it was the last boat of the day, there would be no getting to Bijindo.

    Instead I took in a deep lungful of the clean, salty air and reminded myself that many of my best travels have been the result of mishaps, happy mistakes that forced me to veer off the path. Surely Bijindo wasn’t the only island worth visiting. The hand of the universe seemed to be nudging me in another direction. Who was I to push back?

    I reminded myself that many of my best travels have been the result of mishaps, happy mistakes that forced me to veer off the path.

    After several stops we arrived at our boat’s final island, Yongchondo, where I was told that I could find some accommodation. I strode off the pier and into the village of Hodu (“walnut”), a cluster of small structures huddled together on an isthmus between two main landmasses. The houses were squat and sturdy—uber-quaint hanok and more homely, modern abodes–clumped together and hunkered down against the relentless island elements. Narrow footpaths acted as the village’s streets, and aside from one van parked at the harbor side, there wasn’t a car in sight,. This probably had to do with the fact that, save a single shore road heading out of the village, there was really nowhere to drive.

    Downtown Hodu

    Soon I found Hodu’s one place of commerce, a house with a hand-drawn sign reading: “Convenience Store. Minbak.” I roused the owner–a woman who sported the tight perm ubiquitous to the Korean ajumma. Even in her late 50’s, she was surely one of the youngest residents of the village. Korean islands, it seemed, were a very geriatric affair.

    The woman led me out the door and escorted me to my minbak (a kind of no-frills homestay). She peppered me with the usual questions as we walked (“Where are you from?” “Are you married?”), and I politely lobbed back my well-rehearsed answers. She was surprised to have a customer in late February. I got the impression that Hodu managed to escape the tourist footprint even at the height of the summer season. In fact, other than my accommodation, I only saw one other minbak in the whole village.

    “Do foreigners ever come here?” I asked.

    “No. Never,” she said, laughing. “You’re the first I’ve seen.”

    Hodu’s other minbak

    After unloading my bag into my minbak, I set off, winding my way through the narrow alleys of Hodu. The little homes were nearly all painted white, though the wind and saltwater air had done their best to strip away the coating, revealing scrapes and splotches of grey concrete underneath. The more prosperous places had tiled roofs of blood red or bright blue, while the simpler huts had to settle for corrugated metal.

    As quaint is it may have appeared, Hodu was still a working village, with implements of marine labor piled and stacked up in any available space. This usually took the form of thick grey ropes, coiled like gnarled worms, or giant, clunky styrofoam floats. In between some of the houses were small plots of cultivated land, home to sprouting green even in late winter. These little fields were fenced in by low walls made up of stacked stones, lending the village a rugged, almost medieval look. For a moment I felt like I could be on the coast of Normandy, New England, or even Greece. It seems that old sea villages share some of the same characteristics world over. They’re often stony and tough, obstinate places standing in defiance of the punishing elements that surround them.

    Like their Japanese neighbors, Koreans have a taste for seaweed of all kinds. February must be prime harvest time for miyeok, the darkish kelp served up in birthday soups across the peninsula, since all around the village the locals were gathering, washing, and drying the stuff on the ground or on racks. It was a miyeok explosion, with the skin of the sea plant hanging from rope lines everywhere, blowing in the ocean wind like ragged clumps of hair. As I made my way to the harbor, I spied an old man hanging up huge strands of the stuff. As I approached, he stopped his work and met my eyes.

    I offered a shallow bow, as well as a formal greeting, but he just cocked his head and stared, taking me in with an inscrutable gaze. It would be a stretch to call these islanders friendly, but they weren’t exactly hostile, either. They just had no idea what to make of me.

    I left the village behind me, strolling up the tiny coast road, whose surface was in disrepair, cracking and crumbling from erosion and disuse. On one side was a wall of rock topped with trees; on the other, the sea.

    As I made my way up the road I came upon an abandoned school in a clearing below. The dirt lot in front of the empty building was littered with piles of rubbish, making for a thoroughly ugly scene. I was suddenly saddened by this school. It had been made useless by time, abandoned by the students themselves, who grew up and sensibly emigrated off the island in pursuit of a modern life. Now there were no young people left. The building had outlived its usefulness and now just sat as a neglected, hollowed-out museum of trash.

    The young people left long ago. Who will be around after the old are gone? Is it possible that much of this country’s rural heart will just be abandoned, left for nature to reclaim?

    I’ve traveled extensively in the Korean countryside, and it is shocking to consider just how aged the rural population really is. Children only appear as visitors, while the local residents are deep elderly–all hunched backs and lined faces. The young people left long ago. Who will be around after the old are gone? Is it possible that much of this country’s rural heart will just be abandoned, left for nature to reclaim?     

    As I approached the island’s second village–a larger settlement lacking the cozy splendor of Hodu–I noticed another, even smaller road, leading up inland to my left. A sign reading “POW Camp” pointed up that way, so I turned off the main track and hiked up the rise, passing through fields of high grass home to a family of bleating black goats. At the top was a clearing with another sign, indicating the physical location of the camp. During the Korean War POW, camps were set up on many of these southern islands, as water makes for the best guarantee against escape. As I scanned the clearing around me, I could make out little remaining infrastructure of the camp itself, other than a half collapsed wall and a round depression in front of me that had served as the foundation of a building of sorts. These ruins looked much older than sixty years old and did little to impress, since there was so little of them to take in. Still, they got my imagination rolling. I couldn’t help but wonder if I’d been the first foreigner on this island since the last American soldier left in 1953.

    I made my way back to my minbak in Hodu, but this time over the spine of the island. I followed the road, which was now a dirt track, up toward the main peak of the island, into Yongchodo’s deep pine woods. As I pressed on, I heard the sudden snapping of branches to my right, catching a glimpse of a deer bounding off into the underbrush. I had seen deer on a couple of other occasions on the peninsula, but still felt my heart stop.

    Taking in larger wildlife is a rare thing in Korea; any time it happens the moment must be savored. That’s exactly what I did, and it paid off, for just five minutes later I scared up another, this one a buck, and pretty massive by Korean standards. He blazed down the side of the mountain in a frenzied crackle, crushing any brush in his path. By the end of my little ascent I had stumbled across two more – more deer in one hour than I had seen in more than a decade in the country. And the best part was, since climbing up from the second village, I hadn’t come across a single human being. I’m sure they would have just gawked at me anyway.

    The road soon dissolved into a hiking path, which itself disappeared under the cover of the forest. The only thing marking the ascent was a series of orange tape pieces tied to the tree branches and shrubs, stubbornly visible in the dissolving light. I pressed on, sweating hard under my thick winter jacket and fleece, almost running up the mountain in a race with the sinking sun.

    Soon I found myself at the top, where I gasped to catch my breath and took in a partial view through the trees. I bundled up against the piercing winds and looked out to sea, where I noticed a squall some miles out, a black cloud streaking into the churning waves. The storm obscured the sun, whose final rays arced through the fringes of the dark mass in incandescent blasts. Beyond that I could see Tongyeong, with its fat mountain and string of cable cars, and in the other direction, right there across across the water, the twin rises of Bijindo, which would just have to wait until next time.

     

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    Korea This Week: Stinko Gingkos, BIFF Liberation, & Solo CEO's

    Koreabridge - Mon, 2017-10-16 06:50
    Korea This Week: Stinko Gingkos, BIFF Liberation, & Solo CEO's Stinko Gingkos

    Along with the changing foliage and increased incidence of the exclamation “Chueo!” (“[I’m] cold!”) in Korean discourse, one of the telltale signs of fall around the peninsula is a pervasive smell that has often been likened to a melange of rancid butter, vomit, and gym socks.

    The annual olfactory assault is the product of the rotting fruit of gingko trees, which are a common sight in cities around Korea, particularly Seoul, where gingkos comprise some 40% of the trees planted in the city. When the fleshy coat surrounding the seed begins to rot, it produces butyric acid, which is not coincidentally also present in rancid butter, vomit, and body odor (and by extension, gym socks).

    Many local governments combat the smell by sending crews to pick up the nuts, and they encourage citizens to do the same, as the seeds, once they are removed from the coat, roasted, and paired with a cold lager, are actually quite delicious.

    Slate recently ran an interesting piece on how so many cities ended up with so many lovely but gag-inducing trees, and it’s very much worth reading if you find yourself, as I do, cursing city planners every October.

    Gingko berries after laying around for a few days. Be grateful you can’t smell this photograph. Film Festival Finding Its Old Groove

    The Busan International Film Festival kicked off last Friday with it’s usual pomp, low cut dresses, and unofficial world records for camera flashes per second, as stars from the Korean and international movie firmament descended on Busan Cinema Center for the opening film, “Glass Garden”.

    This year’s festival, the 22nd, marked a return to normal after three years of political struggle stemming from the 2014 decision by the festival organizers to screen the film “Diving Bell”, which leveled harsh criticism at President Park Guen-hye’s handling of the Sewol ferry disaster. The decision to screen the film, despite governmental efforts to block it, resulted in the blacklisting of many actors, filmmakers, and writers, the slashing of the BIFF budget, and other forms of official retribution.

    The air of tension surrounding recent festivals seems to have largely lifted this year amid a much-changed political climate that has seen the impeachment of President Park and the jailing of several aides involved in the blacklisting of artists critical of her administration.

    The Busan International Film Festival runs through October 21st. Check out the BIFF website for the program and other information.

    The 20th BIFF opening night at Busan’s Cinema Center. Recent Festivals were marred by tension between BIFF organizers and the government. Everybody Wants to Rule the World

    According to an OECD report on entrepreneurship cited by a recent Joongang Daily article, Korea has the 4th highest number of one-person businesses among the 38 countries surveyed. The article notes that the trend may be partly explained by Baby Boomers who open small shops as a form of retirement plan.

    I also found myself wondering whether it was connected to the more general recent trend of Koreans eschewing the crowd and doing more things – including eating, drinking, and traveling – by themselves.

    Interestingly, the article refers to anyone who runs their own business as a “CEO”, which thus would seem to refer to the head of any operation, from a multinational corporation down to a hot dog truck. This novel extension of the meaning of CEO also jibes with several years of anecdotal evidence gleaned from conversations with university students, a large number of whom have listed “CEO” as their desired occupation.

    With all these CEO’s, I often wondered, who is left to man the shop? Apparently, the answer could very well be: they are.

    Hyundai CEO Chung Mong-koo speaks to a group of Hyundai non-CEOs.

    And how was your week?




     

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    ‘Manwon’ Food Budget a Day

    Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-10-14 16:39
    ‘Manwon’ Food Budget a Day

    Recently a blogger from the Philippines shared her expenses in touring Korea, and her post drew flak for claiming that in her 5-days-and-4-nights of stay here, she spent only 12,000 pesos (around 235 dollars). She was able to purchase a 3,000-peso roundtrip ticket (around 59 dollars) from Jeju Air, paid 3,120 (around 61 dollars) for her 5D4N stay at a guesthouse and survived with a ‘manwon’ budget on food everyday (That’s barely 450 pesos or 9 dollars!).

    The price of the ticket may come as a shock to many of us who know how expensive it can be to travel overseas, but this extremely tight budget is possible for travelers who wait patiently for promo tickets from airlines such as Cebu Pacific, Jeju Air and Philippine Airlines and are lucky to get that most coveted ticket. A couple of years ago, I was able to buy an inexpensive roundtrip ticket in Cebu Pacific, but the cheapest I got was about 6,000 pesos (117 dollars).

    Guesthouses, on the other hand, can be low-priced if the room is shared by a group.

    What stupefied readers the most was the blogger’s budget on food. I feel kinda sorry for all the bashing she got from those who have lived in Korea for years and know how much the food really costs here, but I’m not siding with her either. Personally, I think she should have given more details of her budget or at least tried to explain what the ‘manwon’ lunch and dinner included since she was encouraging Filipino travelers to visit Korea with minimal budget. On the contrary, I think bashing someone for sharing a memorable experience is a bit out of hand.

    Now, is it really possible to survive a day with that ‘manwon’ food budget? As someone who has lived in Korea for years and has eaten almost every Korean food there is (except poshintang or dog soup), I’m telling you it is possible… but only if you don’t eat like a horse!

    If you’re on a ‘manwon’ budget in Korea, what can you eat for lunch and dinner?

    I’m going to name a few:

    Street food ~ PRICE: from 500 to 3,000 won (23 to 137 pesos)

    Everybody knows that street food is cheap anywhere in the world, but here in Korea, there are tons of mouth-watering and satiating street food to try. Some can be healthy, too. Two or three sticks of hot odeng or fish cake, for example, can squelch your hunger for more or less 3,000 won, like what my tourist friend did when he was starving from his walks around Seoul. There’s barbecue and sausage that you can buy for 2,000 – 2,500 won a stick. Pig-blood sausage may sound disgusting, but sunde is a must-try. An order will not cost you more than 3,000 won. Heck, there’s even tteokbokki you can enjoy for 500 won a cup!

    Kimbop (rice rolls) and other bunsik food ~ PRICE: 1,500 – 5,500 won (68 – 250 pesos)

    Inexpensive Korean food like kimbop, ramyon, tteokbokki, twigim, etc. can be bought in bunsik or bunsik jib (snack restaurants). Kimbop may be considered street food, but this is a common snack for Koreans when they go on a picnic or a meal for Koreans who are always on the go. The country is teeming with kimbop restaurants that sell various kinds of rice rolls: tuna, kimchi, cheese, bulgogi, even tonkatsu! Don’t waste your money on cheap kimbop from convenience stores though, because they’re nasty! If you go to a kimbop restaurant, you can have soup and side dish, usually yellow radish, for free. Some kimbop restaurants have kimbop and udon set for 5,000 to 5,500 won.

    The two dishes I’m going to mention next can be found in the same restaurant.

    Pyohejang guk (beef bone stew) ~ PRICE: 7,000 to 8,000 won (319 – 363 pesos)

    This spicy version of nilagang baka, short ribs and vegetable stew in the Philippines, has everything you need in a meal: lots of meat, vegetables and steamed rice which is served separately. You will also get two or three side dishes which is a common thing in Korea when you order a meal.

    sundae guk (blood sausage soup) ~ PRICE: 5,000 – 8,000 won (227 to 363 pesos)

    In the Philippines, we have dinuguan (pork blood stew). In Korea, they have sundae guk (blood sausage soup). The first time my husband ordered sundae guk for me, I wasn’t sure if I was going to like it, but I ended up finishing the whole bowl! When you eat sundae kuk, you won’t even know you’re eating soup with blood sausage in it, unless someone tells you. The blood sausage is prepared so well that you won’t even smell anything out-of-the-ordinary and there’s no rancid aftertaste. Just like pyeohejang guk, sundae guk is served with steamed rice and side dishes. If you like exotic and spicy food, you will enjoy sundae guk.

    Not-so-spicy sundae guk for 5,000 won

    Spicy sundae guk for 7,000 won

    Noodles are quite affordable, too, and they are delicious. Besides, ramyon and jjampong which are popular in the Philippines, you may want to try…

    Jjajangmyeon (black noodles) ~ PRICE: 3,500 to 5,500 won (159 to 250 pesos)

    This noodle is actually Chinese food, but since it is widely popular in Korea, you can find it anywhere. They even have a day called “Black noodles’ Day” for single men and women. Jjajangmyeon is tasty and filling. The sauce has got bits of pork and onion, and it’s topped with thinly-sliced cucumber. This one is served with yellow radish and some onions as side dishes.

    Naengmyon (cold noodles) ~ PRICE: 5,000 to 7,000 won (227 to 319 pesos)

    Another filling dish that is popular in Korea is naengmyeon. It’s basically thin, chewy noodles served with icy soup, sweet chilli pepper paste, a slice of egg and some radish or cucumber. There are two kinds of naengmyeon. If you’re not into spicy noodles, go for mul naengmyeon, the one that is served with icy broth. If you like it spicier, go for bibim naengmyeon, same ingredients but served with no broth.

    This is how you sip your neangmyeon broth. ^^

    (Cheap) Hansik buffet PRICE: 5,000 (227 pesos)

    Yup, you heard me right, buffet for 5,000 won… but this isn’t the kind of buffet that has it all. The food served in these kinds of buffet are Korean food that you can find in a typical Korean home. I’ve been to two cheap hansik buffets, one in my area in Namyangju and the other in Guri. I didn’t fancy the food, but for the price of 5,000 won, what can one expect? The food, however, was enough to sate my hunger. These types of buffet are frequented by workers and students.

    Convenience store doshirak or bento (lunchbox) PRICE: 4,000 to 6,000 won (182 to 272 pesos)

    When my husband stayed at the hospital with me, he survived for three days on bento meals from the covenience store. I have also tried them. These bentos are not that bad. Most convenience stores in Korea have a microwave oven where you can heat up your bento.

    These are just some of the food you can budget your manwon with here in Korea. There are plenty of meals you can actually have for 450 pesos (9 dollars) or less, but you’ll be missing out on all the delectable dishes Korea has to offer if you will tour this country on a very tight budget. My advise, as a former tourist in Korea, is to save enough money to enjoy Korean cuisine. You don’t have to spend much. A 20 to 25 dollar food budget a day will be enough. With that kind of budget, you’ll get to enjoy grilled meat, drinks, authentic traditional Korean food and more.

    From Korea with Love
    Chrissantosra.wordpress.com


     

     

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    코스 3-3 | Course 3-3 from 갈맷길 365: A Year of Movement

    Koreabridge - Sat, 2017-10-14 04:50
    코스 3-3 | Course 3-3 from 갈맷길 365: A Year of Movement

    If you like trekking on rocky coasts, this course is the one for you. It’s a lot of up and down, but incredible views are around every turn and the natural beauty of Busan is abundant. I started at Yongdusan Park 용두산 공원 in the middle of Course 3-2 and did my best to follow all the cultural highlights in the Nampo area 남포동. It wasn’t marked almost at all and I did a half-hearted rectangle around Ggangtong Market 깡통시장 and Jagalchi Seafood Market 자갈치 before crossing the Yeongdo Bridge 영도대교 and entering the small town vibe on the island of horses. Although this is part of Busan, it has a unique history of being used strategically by the Silla kingdom 신라 and later the Japanese for cattle grazing and horse ranching.

    It officially starts under the Namhang Bridge 남항대교, but don’t be confused by the stamp stand being a ways away at the start of the Jeolyeong Coastal Path 절영해안산책로. From Yeongdo Bridge to Namhang Bridge, the path is mostly city port streets and then city parks. The coastal path is a well-maintained walker’s paradise and generally quite busy with families and elderly couples. There is very little in the way of restaurants, cafes, and shops so pack a sandwich and enough water. I had to go off-course and up the steep stairs to forage for a mart. I ended up finding one open and ate some packaged ‘maple’ bread like it was a piece of heaven. Don’t make the same mistake!

    At the end of the Jeolyeong Coastal Path, you have no choice but to hike a set of rainbow stairs and then wonder where to go. Galmaetgil, what galmaetgil? should be the subtitle of this course. I mostly threw out the map and just followed the coastline until the endpoint at Taejongdae 태종대. I’d been here before with a few groups of friends and knew the way well enough. It’s also my favorite kind of path – rocky coastline. It reminds me of my childhood in Maine looking for tiny creatures in tide pools and eating lobster rolls at Two Lights State Park.

    It was unbelievably sunny and hot for an October day and I was pretty much done with trekking by the time I got to Taejongdae, but the path says to go around the park for about 45 minutes so I did. I faithfully got my final stamp at the Taejongdae Lighthouse and felt a moment of pride. There were a lot of families there for the Chuseok holiday and a man even asked me where I got my Galmaetgil Stampbook. I love when Koreans ask me for some information or directions in Korean as if that were the most natural thing. I look like I belong here and that I can give them the information they need. Like most everyone else, I just want to fit in.

    Course 3-3, plus the Nampo bit that I had to complete, turned out to be about 17 kilometers and just over 4 hours. I found parts of it grueling in the hot sun and wish I had worn long sleeves to get more sun protection. Despite my ajumma hat and 2 sunscreen applications, I ended up quite like a Maine lobster.

    Galmaetgil 365
    A year of movement

     

    Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

    Author Panel w/ Breen, Miller, & Bocskay from HQ (Live Stream)

    Koreabridge - Fri, 2017-10-13 00:13

    A discussion of contemporary Korea with authors Michael Breen ("The New Koreans"), Jeffery Miller ("Bureau 39"), and John Bocskay ("Culture Shock! Korea"), moderated by Steve Feldman, and followed by audience Q&A and book signing. 
    Facebook Event Page


    Attend in Person at HQ Gwangan
    If all goes well (and what could go wrong on Friday the 13th:), we will be streaming this live at:  http://koreabridge.net/live
      Tune in there to watch live video and chime in via text chat. 

    Author Panel w/ Breen, Miller, & Bocskay from HQ (Live Stream)
    Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

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