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사진빨? What is 발? | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-24 12:45

This lesson is about 발. Or is it 빨? What is 발 or 빨? It means an "effect," and it's used directly after a noun to mean the "effect of (noun)." It's used commonly in words such as 사진발 (often as 사진빨), 옷발 (옷빨), 머리발 (머리빨), 화장발 (화장빨), 약발 (약빨), 말발 (말빨), and many others.

This question was originally sent in by one of my subscribers, who was listening to a Stray Kids song and heard it used. Have you ever seen this used before? Let me know here or in the comments on YouTube.

The post 사진빨? What is 발? | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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mom community

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-24 05:30

Hi I'm 2kids mom as 8years old girl and 6years old boy.

We're Korean but My kids were born and raised in Malaysia.

so they feel much comfortable when they stay with foreigner friends.

especiaslly for my first daughter.

anyway I have a plan to visit my hometown Busan coming July for a month, but couldn't find any community to play with any friends or community for me as well. because all the Korean friends busy to go to tuition center for math, music, english...during the day time.

If you know anything, could you recommend me where can we meet expat friends or mom for play date?

Thanks in ahead

Anna

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Jirimsa Temple – 지림사 (Bonghwa, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-23 23:40
The “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa” at Jirimsa Temple in Bonghwa, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Jirimsa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Hogolsan (283.4 m) in northern Bonghwa, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Historic records indicate that there was once a great temple called “Hanjeol” in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). Purportedly, the main temple was surrounded by 27 smaller temples, where about 500 monks lived.

There’s also a temple legend surrounding the founding of neighbouring Chukseosa Temple and Jirimsa Temple. According to this legend, the head monk at Jirimsa Temple saw an auspicious light emanating from the side of the mountain. The head monk then told Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) who was visiting Jirimsa Temple at the time. When Uisang-daesa climbed the mountain, he found an image of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy), which was shining. Afterwards, Uisang-daesa built a temple where he found the statue of Birojana-bul, and he enshrined the statue of Birojana-bul at this new temple. This would be Chukseosa Temple, which was founded in 673 A.D.

Eventually, and during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), Jirimsa Temple would be destroyed by fire. It was finally around 1949 that the monk Gwon Bohun built a small shrine hall and called it Suwolam Hermitage. Eventually, the temple would grow to include a couple of shrine halls, monks’ dorms, and a pavilion for the temple’s National Treasure.

The National Treasure, which is National Treasure #201, is the “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa.”

Temple Layout

From the temple parking lot, you’ll notice the Daeungbo-jeon Hall straight ahead you. The exterior walls are adorned in Buddhist related murals. And at the base of the front doors to the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll find colourful Gwimyeon (Monster Masks) staring in every direction. Stepping inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad of statues underneath a large, golden datjib (canopy). In the centre of this triad is an image dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). And joining this central image on the main altar are Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) and Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise). Hanging on the far right wall is a large, modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the right of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall are the monks’ dorms and the administrative office. To the left of the main hall, on the other hand, you’ll find the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are filled with images of the Dragon Ship of Wisdom, Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife), Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion), and the death of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). Stepping inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a central image of Amita-bul. Rather uniquely, this image of the Buddha of the Western Paradise is all-white. To the right of this central image is a red-accented mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). And to the left of the all-white image of Amita-bul, you’ll find a mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). Sanshin rests on a large mountain ridge. As he rests, he sits on a green mat with an image of a stout tiger at the Mountain Spirit’s side.

To the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, and under a newly built wooden pavilion, you’ll find the “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa.” This 4.3 metre tall image dates back to the late seventh century. The image was carved inside a hole dug into a large rock. The central image has a big, round face. And it displays a gentle smile on its realistic face. The robe covers both of its shoulders, and it has U-shaped folds on its chest that comes down to the pedestal. The right hand is raised to its chest, while the left hand lies on its lap. There’s a nimbus that surrounds its head. The nimbus is covered in lotus flower patterns that are quite elaborate in design. Joining this large central image are four additional images. However, because of the wear caused by the centuries of erosion, it’s impossible to discern who these images may be, whether they’re Buddhas or Bodhisattvas. However, one thing that can be discerned is that large nimbuses surround each of the four seated smaller images.

How To Get There

The easiest way to get to Jirimsa Temple from the Bonghwa Bus Terminal is to simply take a taxi. The taxi ride should take about 10 minutes, or 6 km, and cost you 9,000 won (one way). So if you’re travelling in a group, this might be the best option.

However, if this isn’t an option, for whatever reason, you can also take a bus to get to Jirimsa Temple from the Bonghwa Bus Terminal. You’ll need to take Bus #21 for eight stops. You’ll need to get off at the “Bukji – Sutgol Bus Stop – 북지숫골 하차.” From this bus stop, you’ll need to walk about 7 minutes, or 500 metres, to the west across the stream. In total, the bus ride and walk should take about 25 minutes.

Overall Rating: 6/10

Jirimsa Temple has undergone a lot of recent renovations and rebuilds. Both the Daeungbo-jeon Hall and the Geukrak-jeon Hall are around ten years old. They are stunning, both inside and out, especially the artwork housed inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall and the dancheong that adorns the exterior of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. But with all that being said, it’s the stunning “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa” that’s the main highlight to the temple.

The Daeungbo-jeon Hall at Jirimsa Temple. And a look towards the Geukrak-jeon Hall (right) and the pavilion (left) that houses the “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa.” The stunning dancheong that adorns the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. One of the Gwimyeon (Monster Masks) that adorns the main hall. A look inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall at the main altar. A look towards the Geukrak-jeon Hall at Jirimsa Temple. The Dragon Ship of Wisdom that adorns one of the exterior walls of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The main altar inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall of an all-white image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). Joined by this image of Chilseong (The Seven Stars). As well as this image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The pavilion that houses the “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa.” And the stunning 4.3 metre tall image of the “Rock-carved Seated Buddha in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa.”—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

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Food Film Festival(BIFF)

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-06-22 09:11
Date: Friday, June 28, 2024 - 13:00Location: Event Type: 

------ ATTENTION ------

We are organizing a new event called GATHEROO for international students in Busan! Join us as we visit the Busan Film Food Festa to experience the city’s vibrant festival atmosphere. Afterward, we’ll head to APEC Naru Park for games and enjoy delicious fried chicken together.

‼️ Don’t forget to complete the participation form
-- LINK IN BIO

✶ Date: June 28, 2024
✶ Meeting Point: Namsan Station Exit 3 by 13:00

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Google Form: GATHEROO: 부산 지역 외국인 유학생 대상 지역탐방 및 문화 체험 (google.com) or You may search on IG: kangaroo.bsn

KangarooPost-06-28.png
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Well-experienced English Teacher with F6 Visa Looking for a Job!

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-06-22 02:30
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

Hello! I am a 37-year-old female with F6 visa. I come from the Philippines. I have been teaching English in Busan since August 2015. I live in Saha-gu area. If you need a well-experienced English teacher, please do not hesitate to reach me at 010-2403-8972. My Kakao ID: anelpark.

 

Have a great day!

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F6 Visa holder looking for a 3 days per week ESL teaching job

Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-06-21 11:34
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

Hi everyone,

I am an enthusiastic and dedicated ESL teacher with a F6 Visa and plenty of experience teaching elementary, middle school and university students.

I am looking for a 3 days per week part-time teaching job.

Message me or email me if you are interested and I will send you a resume.

Kind regards. ^^

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    Korean Future Tense – How to Conjugate for Upcoming Events

    Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-06-21 10:55
    To express something in the Korean future tense, use the endings -ㄹ/을 거예요 (-l/eul geoyeyo), -ㄹ/을게요 (-l/eulgeyo), and -겠어요 (-gesseoyo). Just like in other languages, these endings describe what will happen in the future.  The future tense in Korean can indicate both “will”… CONTINUE READING

    Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

    Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

     

    Please share, help Korean spread! 

     

     

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    Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #12: Restaurant – 식당

    Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-20 23:56

    Do you want to hear REAL and NATURAL Korean conversations? Are you INTERMEDIATE level, or currently entering the intermediate level? Then this series is perfect for you. And best of all, it's FREE. This is a 20 episode video series that provides real, natural Korean conversations, and also explains everything to you one line at a time. If you've always wanted to start understanding actual conversations, then look no further! Why am I pitching this like it's a paid course when it's free?

    There is also a book version with the same contents as this course, and 5 additional conversations (for a total of 25). But this video course still has 20 episodes, stands on its own, and is completely free. This lesson is #12, so we're already more than halfway finished.

    The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #12: Restaurant – 식당 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

    www.GoBillyKorean.com

     

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    Daegoksa Temple – 대곡사 (Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-06-19 23:36
    Daegoksa Temple in Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

    Daegoksa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Bibongsan (579.3 m) in northwestern Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. There are no specific records about when Daegoksa Temple was first founded; however, it’s generally assumed to have first been built in 1368 to honour the Indian monk Jigong (1289-1363) who traveled extensively for many years in parts of China (Yuan) and Korea (Goryeo) to help teach Buddhism. As a result, the temple was originally named Daeguksa Temple to commemorate the travels of Jigong to these two great countries. Originally, there were nine hermitages at the temple, as well.

    The temple and eight of the hermitages would later be destroyed in 1592 during the Imjin War (1592-98). Only Jeokjoam Hermitage remained of the nine original hermitages. The temple would later be rebuilt in 1605 by the monk Tanu. It was at this time that the Daeung-jeon Hall was rebuilt. In 1650, the Beomjong-gak Hall was built; and in 1656, the Myeongbu-jeon Hall was built. In 1687, when the Taejeon Hall was rebuilt, the temple changed its name to its current name of Daegoksa Temple.

    In 1990, the monk Beopui built the Nahan-jeon Hall, the Sanshin-gak Hall, and the Iljumun Gate at Daegoksa Temple. It’s also around this time, in November, 1989, that a discovery was made at the temple that would alter the belief in when the temple was first founded. According to the National Council on Research on the Local History of Korea, a claim was made that the temple was first founded during late Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) to early Goryeo (918-1392). The reason for this claim is from a poem written by Lee Gyu-bo entitled “Daegoksa.” Lee wrote this poem after visiting a temple named Daegoksa Temple. This indicates that the temple existed prior to his visit in the 13th century. This is further supported by a gilt-bronze Buddha statue from late Unified Silla being discovered in a field at Daegoksa Temple in 1960.

    In total, there are three Korean Treasures from Daegoksa Temple. They are the Daeung-jeon Hall, which is Korean Treasure #1831; and the “The King of Sweet Dew with Inscription of Daegoksa Temple,” which is currently located in Iksan, Jeollabuk-do at the Wongwang University Museum. The Gamno-do (Sweet Dew Mural) is Korean Treasure #1990. Also, there’s the “Bell Pavilion of Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong,” which is Korean Treasure #212.

    In addition to these three Korean Treasures, there are four provincial treasures. They are the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material #439; the “Multi-Story Stone Pagoda of Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong,” which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material #405; the “Buddhist Painting of Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong (Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva),” which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material #426; and the “Portraits of Three Buddhist Monks and Three Patriarchs in Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong,” which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material #427.

    Temple Layout

    As you make your way up to the temple grounds, you’ll pass by a stunning Iljumun Gate with large pillars and support brackets. It’s wonderfully adorned in dancheong colours. From the temple parking lot, if you head to the left, you’ll make your way up towards Jeokjoam Hermitage. But it’s to the right, and towards Daegoksa Temple, that we want to go.

    Crossing a bridge, and past stone guardian posts to your left and right, as well as a beautiful flower garden, you’ll notice the large “Bell Pavilion of Daegoksa Temple” in the background. This Korean Treasure was first built in the 17th century to house a large Buddhist bronze bell. The bell that was originally housed in this bell pavilion is now located at Yongmunsa Temple in Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. This bell pavilion is now void of bells or percussions instruments. Instead, the four traditional Buddhist percussion instruments are housed inside the newly built Jong-ru Pavilion to the left.

    As for this older bell pavilion, it recently underwent restoration. The pavilion has a hip-and-gable roof that supports intricate bracketing. The pillars that support the main story of the structure is made from roughly cut logs that still retain their original curves. You pass through the first floor of the structure to gain entry into the main temple courtyard at Daegoksa Temple. Housed inside the first story of this structure is an original pillar that was recently replaced for structural reasons. It’s great that they’ve maintained it because it shows the decorative paintings that once filled the historic bell pavilion. There are a flight of stairs to the right that go to the main floor of the structure, but they currently seem off-limits.

    Upon entering the main temple courtyard at Daegoksa Temple, you’ll notice the “Multi-Story Stone Pagoda of Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong” in the centre of the three temple shrine halls. It’s believed that this non-traditional-looking pagoda dates back to the 11th century, and it stands 180 cm in height. The pagoda appears to have originally been thirteen stories in height. However, only twelve currently remain of the roof stones. It’s also missing its finial that once adorned the top of the pagoda. The roof stones are made of dark blue slate. The pagoda is a nice example of an early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) slate pagoda.

    Backing this slate pagoda is the Daeung-jeon Hall. The current Daeung-jeon Hall was rebuilt in 1605, and it was later expanded in 1687. The exterior walls of the main hall remain unadorned. Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad of statues underneath a bracketed datjib (canopy). This multi-layered canopy stands underneath a ceiling full of fading lotus flower paintings. As for the main altar triad, the central image is that of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva Compassion) and Daesaeji-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom and Power for Amita-bul). The interior of the main hall is filled with replicas of the four “Portraits of Three Buddhist Monks and Three Patriarchs in Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong.” These paintings include the triad of Buddhist monks that are Jigong (1289-1363), Naong (1320-1376), and Muhak (1327-1405) with Jigong in the centre. There are three other replica paintings that include Seosan-daesa (1520-1604), Samyeong-daesa (1544-1610), and Damsu (?-?). Also, you can find a smaller sized Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) hanging on the far left wall. The entire interior of the Daeung-jeon Hall is filled with wonderful older murals.

    To the immediate left of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the storage area that also acts as a shrine hall with white and golden images of Buddhas on the main altar. And to the right of the main hall, you’ll find the historic Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The current Myeongbu-jeon Hall was built in 1656. The structure of the gable roof is supported by stunning wing-shaped brackets. Like the Daeung-jeon Hall, the exterior of the shrine hall is left unadorned. Stepping inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, you’ll find a green-haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) on the main altar. This central image is joined on either side by newer wooden statues dedicated to the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). And hanging on the far left wall is a replica of the “Buddhist Painting of Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong (Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva),”

    To the far left of the temple grounds, you’ll find the monks dorms’ and administrative office at Daegoksa Temple. Between monks’ dorms and the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the Nahan-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this shrine hall are adorned with the Shimu-do (The Ox-Herding Murals). There is a large statue of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) all alone on the main altar. This central image is joined on either side by smaller images of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha), as well as seated images of Jeseok-bul (Indra) and Beomcheon-bul (Brahma).

    To the rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall is a beautiful flower garden. And to the far right, just before the temple gives way to being a part of the forest, is the Sanshin-gak Hall. The left exterior wall is adorned with a cartoonish, orange tiger. Stepping inside the shaman shrine hall, you’ll find a beautiful modern painting dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), who is accompanied by a wild-eyed tiger.

    How To Get There

    To get to Daegoksa Temple from the Uiseong Intercity Bus Terminal, it’ll take about two and a half hours. First, you’ll need to take Bus #270 for 40 stops, or one hour, and get off at the “Angyegongyong Bus Jeongryujang Bus Stop – 안계공용버스 정류장 하차.” From this bus stop, you’ll need to take Bus #783 for 17 more stops, or 38 minutes. You’ll need to get off at the “Bongjeong 1-ri Bus Stop – 봉정1리 하차.” From this bus stop, you’ll need to walk about 900 metres, or 15 minutes, to the west. Just follow the signs.

    Overall Rating: 7/10

    For being virtually unknown, Daegoksa Temple has quite a few highlights starting at the Daeung-jeon Hall. Both inside and out, this main hall is absolutely stunning. In addition to this unadorned structure, you can also enjoy the wonderful two-story Beomjong-gak Hall and the historic Myeongbu-jeon Hall. There is a beautiful image dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the shaman shrine hall, as well as the stately presence of the Iljumun Gate at the entry of the temple grounds. And if you have the time, make sure to check out Jeokjoam Hermitage, as well.

    The Iljumun Gate at Daegoksa Temple. A look through the entry gate towards the rest of the temple grounds. A stone guardian post and the Beomjong-gak Hall in the background. A closer look at the Beomjong-gak Hall. Passing under the first story of the structure. The Daeung-jeon Hall and the slate stone pagoda. The main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. A look up at the floral ceiling and elaborate datjib (canopy). A closer look at the main altar triad. A replica of the “Portraits of Three Buddhist Monks and Three Patriarchs in Daegoksa Temple, Uiseong” inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. And a replica of the painting dedicated to Samyeong-daesa (1544-1610) inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, as well. The view after exiting the main hall. The storage area and shrine hall to the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall. A look inside the historic Myeongbu-jeon Hall at Daegoksa Temple. The main altar inside the Nahan-jeon Hall. A look towards the Sanshin-gak Hall. The stunning Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural housed inside the shaman shrine hall. And then it was time to head home.—

    KoreanTempleGuide.com

    Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

    Inner Peace Art Store
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    Juwolsa Temple – 주월사 (Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-16 23:36
    Juwolsa Temple in Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

    Juwolsa Temple is located in eastern Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of Mt. Dochiksan (257.8 m). It’s believed that the temple was first established during the reign of King Sinmun of Silla (r. 681-692 A.D.). It isn’t known exactly when Juwolsa Temple was first established. However, it’s believed that the famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) first built the temple. The temple was later abandoned during the early part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). The temple would be rebuilt in the 18th century. At this time, the temple was known as Juwolam Hermitage. It was finally promoted to a temple, Juwolsa Temple, in 1994, when repairs took place on the temple.

    According to legend, during the reign of King Sinmun of Silla, there was a pond named Cheon-ji Pond on Mt. Bulchulsan above the current location of Juwolsa Temple. From this pond rose three Buddhas, so it was decided that the three Buddhas would be enshrined at Gounsa Temple, Eunhyeonsa Temple, and Juwolsa Temple. Then the surrounding timber around this location was cut down to prepare for the building of a temple. However, one night, the timber simply disappeared. Later, it was discovered that the timber had been transported to a different location, which would be the current temple site of Juwolsa Temple. When people realized that the timber had moved, they also noticed that there were dozens of rabbits around the transported timber. The people that saw this believed that the timber had been moved by the rabbits; and as a result, the temple was thought to have an auspicious location. And on the night that Juwolsa Temple was completed, it’s said that the moon stopped in the sky for several hours. So the temple was named “Juwolsa” because it means “Where the Moon Stays Temple” in English.

    Temple Layout

    Climbing the stone set of stairs from the temple parking lot, you’ll arrive inside the compact temple grounds. Along the way, you’ll pass by a pair of stone lanterns with intertwining dragon-bases. These highly unique lanterns are matched by the five-story pagoda with four compact lions supporting the weight of the body of the pagoda.

    Behind the modern five-story pagoda is the Daeung-jeon Hall at Juwolsa Temple. The exterior walls of the main hall are adorned with various paintings of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). In addition to these exterior paintings of the Nahan, and after entering the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find even more paintings dedicated to the Nahan. As for the main altar, you’ll find a triad of statues centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by images of Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). To the right of the main altar is a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And to the left of the main altar, and rather peculiarly, are two white papered walls with a statue of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattvas of the Afterlife) in the midst of the paper.

    To the immediate right and left of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the monks’ dorms and the temple’s kitchen. It’s up the embankment that you’ll find the next shrine hall at Juwolsa Temple. This shrine hall is the Yonghwa-jeon Hall, which houses a metre tall stone statue dedicated to Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) that dates back to the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392).

    It’s to the right of both the Yonghwa-jeon Hall and the monks’ dorms that you’ll find the Samseong-gak Hall at Juwolsa Temple. Across a bridge that spans a small pond is the entry to the shaman shrine hall. Immediately upon entering the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll be welcomed by a stunning Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural with the hypnotizing presence of a tiger that stands next to the Mountain Spirit. Rounding out the set of shaman deities is a painting dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and a painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). The three shaman paintings are a set, and they are older in appearance.

    How To Get There

    From the Uiseong Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take the bus that reads “의성 – 화목 / Uiseong – Hwamok” on it. You’ll need to take this bus for 13 stops, or 26 minutes. Finally, you’ll need to get off at the “양지3리 – Yangji 3-ri” bus stop. From this stop, you’ll need to walk 1.4 km, or 21 minutes, to get to Juwolsa Temple.

    And if public transportation isn’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Uiseong Intercity Bus Terminal to get to Juwolsa Temple. From the Uiseong Intercity Bus Terminal, it’ll take 22 minutes and cost about 14,000 won (one way) to get to Juwolsa Temple.

    Overall Rating: 6/10

    Juwolsa Temple is situated in a rather remote part of the country in Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. With that being said, the pond out in front of the Samseong-gak Hall and the paintings inside the shaman shrine hall are stunning, as is the temple masonry in the form of the five-story pagoda and dragon-based stone lanterns. You can also enjoy the beautiful views of the valley down below. Juwolsa Temple is especially tempting to those that want to visit the lesser traveled parts of Korea.

    The dragon-based stone lantern at the entry of Juwolsa Temple. The Daeung-jeon Hall fronted by the modern lion-based five-story pagoda. A look inside the main hall. The central image of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) from the Daeung-jeon Hall’s Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). The white walls with Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) in their midst. A painting of one of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). The unpainted Yonghwa-jeon Hall. The stone Goryeo-era statue of Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) inside. The Samseong-gak Hall. A painting of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the shaman shrine hall. Joined by this image of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).—

    KoreanTempleGuide.com

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    From Desktops to Donut Delights: A Sweet Journey in Food Photography

    Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-06-16 10:27

    Over the past few weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of diving into the art of food photography with my students at the Ulsan Support Center for Foreigners. Normally, our classes cover a wide array of photography techniques, but this term, I decided to shake things up and delve deeper into the delectable world of food photography.

    Week 1: Instagram 101 – Capturing Daily Delights

    We kicked off with the basics, focusing on the everyday meals that my students encounter. Think of this as Instagram 101. We explored how to position food and identify the best angles to capture those mouth-watering shots. In a city like Ulsan, where culinary delights are abundant, mastering these basics is essential for any aspiring photographer.

    The results were spectacular. My students produced stunning images that even pushed me to sharpen my own skills. Although my primary expertise lies in landscape photography, I’ve dabbled in food photography for magazines covering local hotspots, and it was invigorating to revisit this genre with fresh eyes.

    Week 2: Practical Session – Snacks, Drinks, and Staging

    Last week’s session was particularly exciting. My students brought in an assortment of snacks and drinks to photograph. I supplied tripods, reflectors, and various backgrounds to assist with staging. Watching my students in action, experimenting with different setups, was incredibly rewarding. Their enthusiasm and creativity were palpable.

    Week 3: Photowalk to Donas Donuts

    The highlight of our unit was the monthly photowalk, which took us to Donas Donuts. Emily, the owner, graciously allowed us to use her café as our studio. Her donuts, some of the best in Ulsan, became our delectable subjects. The challenge was to capture their essence without devouring them first—a struggle, I assure you!

    The turnout for this class was unexpectedly high, filling Emily’s cozy café. My students were respectful and appreciative, fully immersing themselves in the experience of on-location shooting. I extend my heartfelt gratitude to Emily and her staff for their hospitality and patience.

    Gratitude and Guidance

    I must also thank Skyler Burt, a leading expert in food photography who once lived in Ulsan. His guidance and tips were invaluable for this unit. Having friends like Skyler, who are not only exceptional photographers but also willing to support emerging talents, enriches our community and fosters a nurturing environment for creativity.

    Transferring Skills Beyond Food Photography

    One of my students expressed frustration, questioning the time invested in “just taking pictures of food.” I explained that the skills honed in food photography—handling different lighting situations, using reflectors, staging scenes, paying attention to detail, and working in challenging environments—are transferable to many other areas of photography. As we transition to portraiture next week, I’m confident he’ll recognize the value of these foundational skills.

    Thank you to Emily (center) and your amazing staff. Closing Thoughts

    I’m immensely grateful for the opportunity to help my students capture the vibrant food culture of Korea through their lenses. Special thanks to Emily for hosting us at her café and to Skyler Burt for his expert advice. For those looking to dive deeper into food photography, I highly recommend checking out Skyler’s YouTube channel for some fantastic tutorials.

    Until next time, keep experimenting and finding beauty in every frame, whether it’s a sweeping landscape or a sumptuous donut.

    The post From Desktops to Donut Delights: A Sweet Journey in Food Photography appeared first on The Sajin.

    Jason Teale 

    Photographer, educator, podcaster

    Podcast    Website    Instagram

    Photographing Korea and the world beyond!

     

     

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    Korean Present Tense – How to Express Ongoing Actions

    Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-06-14 10:10
    Today, we will quickly go over how verbs are formed in the Korean present tense. Here are the 3 present-tense verb endings: -아요 (-ayo) -어요 (-eoyo) -여요 (해요)  (-yeoyo (haeyo)) In this guide, we will teach you how to conjugate verbs into the present… CONTINUE READING

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    Summer Plans?

    Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-06-14 02:04
    Choices International Travel Domestic Travel Quality Downtime/Staycation Summer Romance Studying / Learning Summer Job / Extra Income Catching up on To Do List Just normal life - nothing special Nothing. I hate summer! Details: 
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    Gaemoksa Temple – 개목사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-13 23:12
    Gaemoksa Temple in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

    Gaemoksa Temple is located near Bongjeongsa Temple in the southeastern foothills of Mt. Cheondeungsan (575.9 m) in northern Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first built during the early part of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). The famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) built the temple during the reign of King Sinmun of Silla (r. 681-692). According to this legend, Uisang-daesa decided to build this temple after gaining enlightenment inside the neighbouring Cheongdeung-gul Cave, which is located directly behind the temple. Originally, the temple was called Heungguksa Temple, which means “Making the Country Thrive Temple” in English. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), Jeong Mong-ju (1338-1392) studied at the temple.

    During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the name of the temple changed from Heungguksa Temple to that of its current name of Gaemoksa Temple. Around this time, there were many blind people living in the Andong area, but after this temple was constructed many of these people regained their ability to see. That’s why the name of the temple changed from Heungguksa Temple to Gaemoksa Temple. In English, Gaemoksa Temple means “Opening the Eyes of People Temple.”

    There is a Korean Treasure at Gaemoksa Temple. It’s the Wontong-jeon Hall, which is Korean Treasure #242.

    Gaemoksa Temple during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45). (Picture courtesy of here). The Wontong-jeon Hall at Gaemoksa Temple also from Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45). (Picture courtesy of here). Temple Layout

    You first approach Gaemoksa Temple up a long, winding mountain road. It appears as though it was recently paved, so the way up is quite easy. Eventually, you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot with a stunning view of the city of Andong off in the distance. And between the view and the city is the temple pond with surrounding purple flowers.

    You’ll then pass through the Uhwa-ru Pavilion. This stunning, all-natural entry gate has old monks’ dorms on the backside of the pavilion. Straight ahead, on the other hand, is the Wontong-jeon Hall. It’s believed that this shrine hall was first constructed in 1457. The reason that this is believed is that there is a written record found inside the shrine hall from its reconstruction in 1969. This written record states “The First Year of Joseon Conforming with God.”

    As for the structure of the shrine hall, it’s situated under a gable roof. There are brackets placed on poles to support the weight of the roof. The front and back of the building are shaped differently. The front of the building has a raised, wooden corridor. The exterior walls are adorned in simple dancheong colours. Additionally, the shrine hall has ondol (a traditional floor heating system in Korea), which is extremely rare in an early Joseon Dynasty shrine hall.

    As for the main altar inside the Wontong-jeon Hall, you’ll find three different incarnations of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Of the three, it’s the central image that’s most distinct and probably the oldest. Its face is slender, and it’s wearing an ornate crown. To the left of the main altar, you’ll find a modern painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife); while to the right of the main altar, you’ll find an equally modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). If you look closely, you’ll find a rather rare sight. In this painting is an image of Yongwang (The Dragon King) wearing a military uniform similar to that of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) in the same painting.

    To the left of the Wontong-jeon Hall are the monks’ dorms and administrative offices at Gaemoksa Temple. And to the right of the main hall, you’ll find the Sanshin-gak Hall, which is currently under reconstruction. This shaman shrine hall, however, functions as a Sanshin/Chilseong-gak Hall. The image of a Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) painting inside the shaman shrine hall holds a golden fan, and the tiger looks especially fierce. To the right of the Sanshin painting is an older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

    How To Get There

    From the Andong Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #310 to get to Gaemoksa Temple. You’ll need to take this bus for 14 stops, or 16 minutes, and get off at the “Bongjeongsa Bus Station Bus Stop – 봉정사 정류장 하차.” From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 1.4 km, or 21 minutes, to get to Gaemoksa Temple.

    Another way that you can get to Gaemoksa Temple is after visiting Bongjeongsa Temple. After visiting Bongjeongsa Temple, there is a trail to the east of the temple grounds near Yeongsanam Hermitage. The hike from Bongjeongsa Temple to Gaemoksa Temple will take 11 minutes over 600 metres.

    And if public transportation and a trip to Bongjeongsa Temple aren’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Andong Bus Terminal to get to Gaemoksa Temple. The taxi ride will take you around 20 minutes over 14 km, and it’ll cost you around 19,000 won (one way).

    Overall Rating: 6/10

    The views and close proximity of Gaemoksa Temple to Bongjeongsa Temple are definitely pluses. Additionally, the 15th century Wontong-jeon Hall is absolutely stunning architecturally with its exposed rafters and wooden corridor out in front of the actual shrine hall. Stepping inside the historic main hall, you’ll find a stunning central image of Gwanseeum-bosal. Additionally, you can also enjoy the mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the shaman shrine hall. It doesn’t hurt that the abbot at Gaemoksa Temple is quite friendly, too. While smaller in size, and if you’re already visiting Bongjeongsa Temple, Gaemoksa Temple is definitely worth a bit of your time, as well.

    The view of Andong off in the distance from the heights of Gaemoksa Temple. A colourful moth at the temple. Some beautiful purple flowers at the temple. The Uhwa-ru Pavilion at the entry of the temple grounds. A look through the Uhwa-ru Pavilion towards the historic Wontong-jeon Hall. The Wontong-jeon Hall. The corridor just outside the main hall. The main altar inside the Wontong-jeon Hall. A closer look at the central image of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). A painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the main hall. The modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Wontong-jeon Hall. A closer look at the image of Yongwang (The Dragon King) wearing a military uniform inside the Shinjung Taenghwa. The Sanshin-gak Hall that’s currently under construction. The image of Chilseong (The Seven Stars) inside the shaman shrine hall. Joined by this golden image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And adorning the interior walls of the Sanshin-gak Hall are these lotus flowers.—

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    Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #11: Food – 음식

    Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-06-13 12:16

    We're past the halfway point, and are at 11 out of 20 episodes in my free "Korean Conversation Course." This episode will teach you about preparing food (at least about getting ingredients), and has a fully natural Korean conversation with complete grammar and vocabulary breakdowns.

    The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #11: Food – 음식 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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    Gyeongheungsa Temple – 경흥사 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-06-12 23:15
    The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” in Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

    Gyeongheungsa Temple is located in southern Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the northeast of Donghaksan (602.7 m). It’s believed by some that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 659 A.D. by the monk Hyegong-hwasang. But the evidence is rather thin to support this theory. Another theory states that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 1637. And later, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was enshrined at the temple in 1644. The temple would be rebuilt in 1719 and further rebuilt in 1897.

    In the 1990s, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was examined to reveal a written message on the clothing of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This written message revealed that there used to be four to five hermitages at Gyeongheungsa Temple before it was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98). Additionally, the temple was quite large and had dozens of monks that lived at the temple.

    In 1990, the Daeung-jeon Hall was dismantled, repaired, and restored. Also, the monks’ dorms were repaired this time, as well. In 1993, a new Daeung-jeon Hall was built at Gyeongheungsa Temple. And the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was moved to the new Daeung-jeon Hall, while the old Daeung-jeon Hall was converted into the temple’s Myeongbu-jeon Hall.

    The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” is Korean Treasure #1750, while the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan” is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #555.

    Temple Layout

    As you first approach the temple grounds, and as you enter the temple parking lot, you’ll notice the temple budowon (stupa field) to the right of the temple shrine halls. Slightly elevated, there are a row of six stupas varying in both shape and size to greet you as you first approach Gyeongheungsa Temple.

    A little further to the left and past the monks’ dorms, there is a cluster of some four temple shrine halls. The first of these shrine halls is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals dedicated to Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) and the Bodhidharma. Housed inside this shrine hall is a triad centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) and Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Underneath this triad is only a small part of the main altar, which is known as a “sumidan” in Korean. Officially, this altar is known as the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan,” and it’s Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Material #555. Considering the normal size of a “sumidan,” it would appear as though only one-fifth of the original altar still remains. Some of the subjects on the altar that still remain are crabs, fish, frogs, lotus flowers, and peonies. Based on what remains of the “sumidan,” it’s presumed that the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple” was built in the early 17th century. And to the right of this historic main altar is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

    Between the monks’ dorms and the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, and up a set of stairs, is the Daeung-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this hall are adorned with Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” on the main altar. This triad consists of a central image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha) being joined on either side by Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) and Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power). This Korean Treasure dates back to 1644, as indicated by a prayer discovered inside the statue of Seokgamoni-bul. There’s also an inscription on the pedestal that Seokgamoni-bul rests upon, as well. Additionally, records including the background, organizer, and maker of the statues were stored inside the body of the Historical Buddha. These records also relate the material used and the monk-sculptor, Cheongheo, who made these 17th century wooden statues. He was based out of Geumsansa Temple in Jeollabuk-do and was invited to many temples, including Gyeongheungsa Temple, to create these beautiful Buddhist statues. All three of the statues are both strong and serene in nature. And both Bodhisattvas wear regal crowns. The triad is a great example of Buddhist artistry during the mid-17th century. Also housed inside the main hall is a mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal, as well as a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

    To the rear of these two shrine halls, and slightly up an embankment, are two smaller sized shaman shrine halls. Turning to the left and then to the right, you’ll make your way up towards these shaman shrine halls along a forested pathway. The first of the two is the Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall are a pair of original murals dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). A little further to the right is the temple’s Sanshin-gak Hall. This shaman shrine hall houses a blue background fronted by an image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) joined with a tiger with a nearly human face.

    How To Get There

    To get to Gyeongheungsa Temple from the Gyeongsan Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to walk for about five minutes, or 300 metres, to get to the Gyeongsan Shijang (market) bus stop. From this bus stop, you’ll need to take Bus #100. After 14 stops, or 21 minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “Daemyeong 2-ri (Cheong-do Banghyang) – 대명 2리 (청방향)” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 2.2 km to get to the temple.

    And if public transportation isn’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Gyeongsan Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride will take you about 15 minutes, over 8 km, and it’ll cost you 12,000 won (one way).

    Overall Rating: 6.5/10

    The two major highlights at Gyeongheungsa Temple are the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple in Gyeongsan” and the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple.” Even though only twenty percent of the main altar inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall is still intact, it’s a stunning one-fifth. Also, the main altar triad inside the newly built Daeung-jeon Hall are stunning, as well, both in scope and style. In addition to these rather obvious highlights, you can also enjoy the three shaman murals inside the two shaman shrine halls, as well as the collection of stupas inside the budowon at the entry of the temple grounds.

    One of the stupa in the budowon at the entry of the temple grounds. The Myeongbu-jeon Hall. A rather surprised image of Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). The triad inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall that rests upon the “Buddhist Altar at Gyeongheungsa Temple.” The Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The pathway leading up to the new Daeung-jeon Hall. One of the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals) that adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The modern painting dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) inside the main hall. The central image of Dongjin-bosal (The Bodhisattva that Protects the Buddha’s Teachings) from the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) from inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The trail leading up to the two shaman shrine halls at Gyeongheungsa Temple. The Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall (foreground) and Sanshin-gak Hall (background). The blue image of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And the image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit).—

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    Important Hanja: THE POWER 력 (力) (한자) | Korean FAQ

    Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-06-11 03:30

    It's time for a new Hanja lesson, and this time we're going to learn about the Hanja 力. This Hanja is read as either 력 or 역, and means "power," an "ability," or "strength." Watch my new video below to learn all about how it's used.

    The post Important Hanja: THE POWER 력 (力) (한자) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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    Korean - English free language exchange by zoom

    Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 06:12
    Classified Ad Type: 

    Hello

    I am learning Korean and would like to find a Korean to do a language exchange by  zoom once a week for  about an hour. Probably in the morning some time. 

    My Korean is at the beginner's level. I would like to make and understand short and simple, ordinary Korean sentences. I have a book but I am more interested in trying to speak without a book if that is possible.

    In return I can offer 30 mins free talking in English.

    I live in Busan (Dongnae) but can do a zoom class if more convenient.

    Regards

    Joseph. 

     

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    Korean Past Tense – How to Express Earlier Actions

    Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 04:53
    If you want to indicate something in the Korean past tense, you will be using the verb endings -었/았/ㅆ어요 (-eot/at/sseoyo). These work … Korean Past Tense – How to Express Earlier Actions The post Korean Past Tense – How to Express… CONTINUE READING

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    Native Speaker Offering Online English Classes (For Charge Not Exchange)

    Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-06-10 01:49
    Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://www.facebook.com/AskEnglishTuitionAndTraining?mibextid=ZbWKwL

    I am an American with 22 years teaching experience including IGCSE First and Second Language, Checkpoint English, IGCSE Literature, A Levels English and Literature, and IELTS. Have also recently completed a certification course in IGCSE Geography. I can also create courses based on need and work on building English fluency in all areas (speaking, writing etc.). I teach online and my connection is fast and secure. www.facebook.com/AskEnglishTuitionAndTraining?mibextid=ZbWKwL

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