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Fully Furnished Housing at Gwangan Station (No deposit)

Koreabridge - Fri, 2023-02-03 11:36
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Gwanganlli BeachContact person by email A fully furnished one-room is available right by the Gwangan Station. It is a newly built officetel building with CCTV & within 2 min walk to Gwangan subway station.   AMENITIES: Air-Condition, TV Free WIFI Double Bed, Closet Refrigerator, Geyser Washing Machine Gas Range, Microwave   RENT: 450,000 KRW (Includes everything) only pay for your Gas & Electricity usage DEPOSIT: One Month rent only   Serious Inquiries Only 329256819_709020290663014_3930493303864449937_n.jpg 328713185_842349920198147_6910971580223975750_n.jpg 329094808_1865654873800026_5307520324823981486_n.jpg 328636600_869942274061510_7034511585830111248_n.jpg 329021263_578068167218517_7185166669210009963_n.jpg 329070097_716459189988782_7846297974820823295_n.jpg 329187834_819049823142123_4857870102414285833_n.jpg

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Eunhasa Temple – 은하사 (Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2023-02-01 23:33
Eunhasa Temple in Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Eunhasa Temple, which means “Silver Water Temple” in English, is located in the foothills of Mt. Sineonsan (630.7 m), or “Fish Deity Mountain” in English in Gimhae, Gyeongsangnam-do. And the reason that Eunhasa Temple has this name is that Mt. Sineonsan used to be called Mt. Eunhasan. According to a legend, Eunhasa Temple dates back to the reign of King Suro of Geumgwan Gaya (?-199 A.D.), when it was built by the monk (and brother to Queen Heo), Jangyu-hwasang. What is more likely, and based upon earthenware found on the temple grounds, is that the temple dates back to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.), since Buddhism had yet to be introduced to the Gaya Confederacy (42-562 A.D.) at this time. When the temple was in fact first constructed, it was called Seonimsa Temple. During the Imjin War (1592-1598), and in 1592, the entire temple was destroyed by the invading Japanese. The Daeung-jeon Hall, which is the main hall at Eunhasa Temple, was rebuilt in 1629. Subsequently, Eunhasa Temple has been rebuilt and restored three additional times, including in 1649, 1801, and 2003. And in March, 1989, a forest fire broke out on Mt. Sineosan; fortunately, Eunhasa Temple was spared when very little else on the mountain was.

Temple Layout

You first approach Eunhasa Temple up a winding road for about 400 metres, until you come to the temple parking lot. You’ll need to climb an uneven set of large stone stairs to make your way towards the main temple courtyard. Along the way, you’ll pass by a lotus pond with a bronze image of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) in the centre. Crossing over the fish-designed granite bridge, you’ll pass by a forested pathway to your right. Straight ahead, and up some more uneven stone stairs, you’ll pass through a gate with three doors. Having passed through this gate, you’ll enter into the lower temple courtyard at Eunhasa Temple.

In the lower courtyard, and to your immediate right, is a gift shop and tea house. Straight ahead is another temple parking lot. And to the far left, you’ll find the temple’s administrative office. But what is most memorable about the lower courtyard is the Jong-ru Pavilion that hovers over top of the lower courtyard. It’s doubly impressive with the imposing Mt. Sineosan off in the distance framing the entire temple grounds.

Up even more stairs, you’ll finally enter into the main courtyard at Eunhasa Temple. To your immediate left is the beautiful Jong-ru Pavilion that you were looking up at. The exterior is adorned with unusually designed dragon heads that are perched along the railing of the bell pavilion. And in the centre of the Jong-ru Pavilion is a beautiful Brahma Bell.

Next to the Jong-ru Pavilion, and up the last of the uneven set of stone stairs, is the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are simply adorned in dancheong; however, the beautiful floral latticework that adorns the front of the shrine hall are exquisitely detailed both in form and colour. Stepping inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, you’ll find a green haired image dedicated to Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) on the main altar. And this central image is joined on either side by the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). There are also a pair of Vajra Warriors at the entrances to the shrine hall.

Centrally located, and in the upper courtyard, are three more temple halls. The temple shrine hall in the centre is the Daeung-jeon Hall. This rather compact main hall is beautifully adorned both inside and out. The exterior walls are adorned with Buddhist-motif murals. Stepping inside, and rather oddly, you’ll find a large golden statue dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). This is peculiar because the main hall is a Daeung-jeon Hall, which is typically reserved for Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). This image of Gwanseeum-bosal is adorned with a beautiful, ornate crown. There are various paintings inside the main hall. And adorning the interior walls are murals dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal and Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

To the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Samseong-gak Hall. One of the exterior walls of this shaman shrine hall is adorned with a life-like painting of a tiger. Stepping inside the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll find three shaman murals hanging on the main altar. The central image is dedicated to Chilseong, while the images to the right and left are dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) and Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). The final mural housed in the Samseong-gak Hall is a painting dedicated to Jangyu-hwasang, the brother of Queen Heo.

And to the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Nahan-jeon Hall. This compact shrine hall is dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). Stepping inside the Nahan-jeon Hall, you’ll find an all-white image of Seokgamoni-bul on the main altar, who is joined by sixteen white images of the Nahan.

How To Get There

You can catch Bus #98 from the Gimhae Intercity Bus Terminal, which is next to the Royal Tomb of King Suro subway stop. Take this bus for 4.7 km until you arrive at Inje University. From Inje University you can get to the temple in one of two ways: first, you can either walk the 3 km hike up the hill; or second, you can take a taxi for about 5,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 7.5/10

Eunhasa Temple is scenically located beneath the gray granite peaks of Mt. Sineosan. The beautifully adorned Jong-ru Pavilion, the majestic statue of Gwanseeum-bosal inside the main hall, and the shaman murals inside the Samseong-gak Hall are all something to keep an eye out for as is the lotus pond at the entry of Eunhasa Temple. Eunhasa Temple is one of those temples that seamlessly combines nature with temple shrine halls.

The entryway to the temple grounds. The statue of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) in the middle of the lotus pond at the entry of the temple grounds. The beautiful view towards the lotus pond. A look up towards a stone guardian. The Jong-ru Pavilion at Eunhasa Temple. One of the peculiar dragon heads that adorns the Jong-ru Pavilion. And the beautiful Brahma Bell inside the Jong-ru Pavilion. A look up towards the Daeung-jeon Hall. The construction of Eunhasa Temple. This mural adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. And a look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall at the main altar statue of Gwanseeum-bosal. The beautiful floral latticework that adorns the Myeongbu-jeon Hall. A look inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall with a green haired image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) on the main altar. The Samseong-gak Hall at Eunhasa Temple. With a look inside the shaman shrine at a mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And a mural dedicated to Jangyu-hwasang inside the Samseong-gak Hall, as well. To the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Nahan-jeon Hall. There was a ceremony taking place when I visited. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

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"About to" ~락 말락 하다 & ~랑 말랑 하다 | Live Class Abridged

Koreabridge - Wed, 2023-02-01 15:19

This Sunday I did a live stream all about the grammar form ~락 말락 하다, which is an advanced form. Where have you seen this form used before?

We also learned about the related form ~락 ~락, as well as ~랑 말랑 하다, and talked about its origins.

The post "About to" ~락 말락 하다 & ~랑 말랑 하다 | Live Class Abridged appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Korean classes in February!

Koreabridge - Wed, 2023-02-01 03:05
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu haeundae seomyon ksu bsu jangsanContact person by email

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

 

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

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datebest.net - visit website and win smartphone!

Koreabridge - Wed, 2023-02-01 00:42
Location: https://datebest.net - visit website and win smartphone!
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datebest.net - visit website and win smartphone!

Koreabridge - Wed, 2023-02-01 00:42
Location: https://datebest.net - visit website and win smartphone!
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EAL Cafe

Koreabridge - Tue, 2023-01-31 07:32
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://www.ealcafe.comEmail: Contact person by email

Can you imagine how AMAZING it would be to speak English like a native speaker?

** Packages available for students & teachers **

To understand and be able to converse about current trends and topics in English, like you’ve been speaking English for years? English for the 21st Century Learner will help you achieve this! With learning methods that are EXCITING, STIMULATING, and FUN…

This book features up-to-date and modern vocabulary, grammar and slang, rather than the typical English you have been learning about your whole life.

https://www.instagram.com/eal_cafe/

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“Good Evening” in Korean – How to use this greeting

Koreabridge - Tue, 2023-01-31 03:08

Do you know how to say “good evening” in Korean? Until now, we’ve learned a little about the Korean greetings covered in this article. And another standard greeting around the world is “good evening.”

In the early hours of the day, you may say “good morning,” and for most of the school and work hours, it may be “good day” or even “good afternoon,” and when going to bed, you may wish someone “good night.”

But between afternoon and night, typically around dinner time or other evening activities, after work and school are out, is the perfect time to wish someone a “good evening!” So, today we will learn the Korean way to say “good evening.” You will also learn when native speakers like to use this greeting. Let’s get to learning!”

How to say “good evening” in the Korean language

There are many ways to say the Korean greeting “good evening.” We’ve divided them into formal, standard, and informal/casual ways.

Formal ways to say “good evening” in Korean

The phrase for “good evening” in the Korean language is 좋은 저녁입니다 (joeun jeonyeogimnida) which is used in a formal situation. It should be pretty easy to remember as 저녁 (jeonyeok) is also used to refer to dinner, and 좋은 (joeun) is simply a conjugation of the verb for good, 좋다 (jota). Officially the literal translation of the word 저녁 (jeonyeok) is “evening.”

Standard ways to say “good evening” in Korean

Another way to wish someone “good evening” is by saying 좋은 저녁 되세요 (joeun jeonyeong doeseyo). As you may notice, it is essentially the same phrase and has the same meaning, with a slightly different verb ending in use. Of course, you may not always need to be so formal when wishing or greeting someone with “good evening.”

For a more polite and neutral version, you may use either 좋은 저녁이에요 (joeun jeonyeogieyo) or 좋은 저녁 돼요 (joeun jeonyeok dwaeyo).

Informal ways to say “good evening” in Korean

You may say 좋은 저녁이야 (joeun jeonyeogiya) or 좋은 저녁 돼 (joeun jeonyeok dwae) for a more informal or casual way. And, of course, you may always simply wish someone 좋은 저녁! (joeun jeonyeok!) without any type of verb ending. You can use this with your friends, family, or younger people you know.

However, it may not be terribly common for Koreans to hear this phrase. Instead, it’s pretty usual for Koreans to simply greet each other with “hello,” so you can use this when you speak with your Korean friends. You can read more about “hello” in Korean from our dedicated article.

Is there a specific time when “good evening” in Korean is used?

Generally, you can start wishing someone a “good evening” from 6 pm onward. You can then continue using the greeting until right around midnight.

Of course, you may also opt to switch to “goodnight” earlier in the late evening. For example, it may sound odd if you wish someone “good evening” when you’re about to go to bed, even if it is not midnight.

Good evening vs. Good night in Korean

As we mentioned above, “good evening” can be used until midnight. Only after that must you say “good night.” However, on many occasions, it may be more natural to say “good night” rather than “good evening” when talking to someone even earlier in the evening.

Especially if you are about to sleep or say bye to someone at the end of a meeting, “good night” may sound better. On the other hand, if you are greeting someone at the start of a meeting, even if it’s late evening, saying “good evening” will be better than “good night.” And do remember that “hello” and “goodbye” are perfect greetings any time of day.

Sample sentences and related vocabulary

In this below section, you will find sentences and related vocabulary, which hopefully will make it easier for you to use the phrase “good evening” in Korean.

좋은 저녁이에요! 오랜만이네요, 어떻게 지내고 있어요? (joeun jeonyeogieyo! oraenmanineyo, eotteoke jinaego isseoyo?)

Good evening! Long time no see, how have you been doing?

안녕하세요! 좋은 저녁이에요? (annyeonghaseyo! joeun jeonyeogieyo?)

Hello! Are you having a good evening?

좋은 저녁 되세요! (joeun jeonyeok doeseyo!)

Have a good evening!

집에 가기 전에 그에게 좋은 저녁을 기원했어요. (jibe gagi jeone geuege joeun jeonyeogeul giwonhaesseoyo.)

I wished him a good evening before I went home.

오늘 저녁 너무 좋지 않아요? (oneul jeonyeok neomu jochi anayo?)

Isn’t it such a nice evening today?

Korean Greetings related to “good evening”

Here are other Korean words and phrases related to “good evening.”

EnglishKorean Good evening좋은 저녁 (joeun jeonyeok) Good night좋은 밤 (joeun bam) Good afternoon좋은 오후 (joeun ohu) Good morning좋은 아침 (joeun achim) Good day좋은 날 (joeun nal) Hello안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo) Goodbye (go well)안녕히 가세요 (annyeonghi gaseyo) Goodbye (stay well)안녕히 계세요 (annyeonghi gyeseyo) Goodbye (go well)잘 가요 (jal gayo) How are you?어떻게 지내요? (eotteoke jinaeyo?) Good, nice좋다 (jota) Evening저녁 (jeonyeok) It's good to see you만나서 반가워요 (mannaseo bangawoyo) Wrap Up

How do you usually greet a friend or other people? Does it change depending on the time of day? Or do you simply stick with “hello” around the clock?

With this information useful in your daily life, you should now be able to greet people using the Korean phrase “good evening!” Do you still remember what time of day and which situation it’s best to use? Let us know below in the comments if this is a common greeting used by you, either in the Korean language or in your native language!

Next up, if you’d like to learn Korean further, maybe you would like to brush up more on your Korean conversation skills in general.

The post “Good Evening” in Korean – How to use this greeting appeared first on 90 Day Korean®.

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

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Important Hanja: 용 (用) (한자) – “To Use” 사용하다 vs 이용하다 | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Mon, 2023-01-30 15:22

Where have you seen the Hanja 用 used before? This Hanja means "use," or in Korean can mean the verbs 쓰다, 사용하다, and 이용하다. In this video I'll explain how this Hanja is used, but I'll also talk about the differences between 쓰다, 사용하다, and 이용하다.

The post Important Hanja: 용 (用) (한자) – “To Use” 사용하다 vs 이용하다 | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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American 15 yrs exp. M.E.D. F6 Visa holder looking P/T Fridays

Koreabridge - Mon, 2023-01-30 06:20
Classified Ad Type: Location: Contact person by email

Please feel free to message me anytime. I have my Masters degree in teaching English as a 2nd language.

Resume will be forwarded upon serious requests.

Good Day...

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F.6 Visa Looking for work in Busan

Koreabridge - Mon, 2023-01-30 04:11
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

Hi, all

Looking for work in  Busan

I am also looking for any non-teaching work if possible.

full-time part-time

any suggestions?

Living in Busan

any suggestions feel free to contact me.

F6 Visa Native speaker

2 years of teaching experience in South Korea

Please don't hesitate to contact me for more details.

다정다감한  원어민강사입니다

연락주세요

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