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Updated: 1 hour 16 min ago

Share House. 1min from PNU Main Gate.

6 hours 53 min ago
Classified Ad Type: Contact person by email

It is a share house very close to the main gate of Pusan National University.

This share house is Clean, All Remodeled, full furnished.

Deposit: 3 million won
Monthly rent: 400,000 won (including water bill, electricity, gas, Internet, TV, and Wi-Fi usage fees)

A six-month contract is possible.

You can write a contract in real estate, so you can make a safe contract. The brokerage fee is free. You don't have to speak Korean because you have someone to help you translate. If you want, I will issue an English contract.

If you want more information or visit, please send a message to Kakao Talk below.

kakao id: luvpkkim

 

 

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Manboksa-ji Temple Site – 만복사지 (Namwon, Jeollabuk-do)

Wed, 2023-02-08 23:25
The Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site in Namwon, Jeollabuk-do. Temple Site History

The Manboksa-ji Temple Site is located in Namwon, Jeollabuk-do to the south of Mt. Girinsan (238.9 m). It’s believed that the temple was first built during the reign of King Munjong of Goryeo (r. 1046-1083). At the time of its construction, the temple was quite large in size. According to records, there was a five-story wooden pagoda and a two-story main hall at the temple. And inside the two-story main hall stood a ten metre tall Buddha statue made of bronze. The temple was also used as a backdrop for one of Kim Si-seup’s (1435-1493) stories, Manboksa jeopogi, in the Geumo Sinhwa. Eventually, the temple was destroyed at the same time that the Namwonseong Fortress fell during the Imjin War (1592-1598) in 1597. Since then, the temple hasn’t been restore.

More recently, and from 1979 to 1985, there were seven excavations conducted at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site by the Jeonbuk National University Museum. During this time, the foundations for the various shrine halls, gates, and corridors were discovered. Also discovered on the temple grounds were celadon, white porcelain, and several roof tiles from the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). And rather interestingly, the layout of the Manboksa-ji Temple Site follows the Goguryeo-style of temple layouts, which gives a greater insight into this style of temple. In total, the temple site is some 3,200 pyeong in size, or 10578.5 m2.

In total, the Manboksa-ji Temple Site is home to four Korean Treasures, and the temple site itself is classified as a Historic Site. The four Korean Treasures are the Five-Story Stone Pagoda at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #30; the Stone Pedestal at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #31; the Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #32; and the Stone Standing Buddha at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #43.

The Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site and the Manboksa-ji Seokinsang at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site from 1934. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Site Layout

You first enter the temple site grounds from the west. And the first thing to greet you at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site is the Manboksa-ji Seokinsang, or the “Manboksa-ji Stone Statue of a Man” in English. Originally, it was part of a pair some four metres south of the Dangganjiju (flagpole supports). However, since one was so near the road, it was moved to its present location inside the temple site grounds. The stone statue is a square column; however only three of the sides were used to construct the statue’s design. The head of the statue is circular in shape and the eyes protrude out from its head. This gives the statue an angry appearance. The torso of the body is left unclothed, and the right hand is clenched. It’s unclear what it holds in this hand. The clothes have pleats, and the statue has no pedestal. In total, the statue stands some 5.5 metres in height, as it scowls over the rest of the temple site grounds.

A little bit further to the east, but still hugging the roadside embankment, you’ll find the first of the four Korean Treasures at the temple site: the Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site (T #32). Traditionally, these flagpole supports were used to hoist flags during special Buddhist ceremonies or prayers near the entrance of a temple. The flagpoles were supported by two stone supports. In Korean, these are known as dangganjiju. These two supports are taller in size at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site. In total, each stone support has three holes on them for the flagpole to be affixed to. Since the bottom of the flagpole supports are buried underground, it’s impossible to know the exact size and design of the supports. The flagpole supports are roughly cut and uneven along their surfaces. And they lack any special adornments. Judging from their simplicity, it’s believed that these flagpole supports date back to the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392).

To the north of the Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site is the foundation for the entry gate. Beyond this is a seokdeung daeseok, which is a stone lantern base from the early Goryeo Dynasty. And beyond this is the large foundation for the five-story wooden pagoda. To the right of this central foundation for the former wood pagoda is the foundation for a auxiliary hall, and to the left of the pagoda foundation is yet another foundation for another auxiliary hall. The difference with the western shrine hall foundation is that it has the Stone Pedestal at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #31, resting in the centre.

The Stone Pedestal at Manboksa Temple Site was designed to hold a statue of the Buddha. The pedestal is engraved with three hexagonal bases with a top, middle, and lower portion to it made from one piece of stone. On the six sides of the lower base, you’ll find the images of elephant eyes, which are joined by floral patterns. The middle part of the base, which is narrower than the other two sections of the pedestal, has short-pole patterns on its six sides. And the top part of the pedestal has a square-hole on top in which the statue of the Buddha would presumably be placed. Unfortunately, the top part of the pedestal’s lotus flower engravings have been damaged beyond repair during the subsequent centuries. The Stone Pedestal at Manboksa Temple Site is believed to have been produced during the 11th century, as it’s hexagonal shape is in contrast to the typical octagonal style of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.).

To the rear of the three foundations for auxiliary shrine halls and the five-story wooden pagoda is the foundation for the main hall at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site. It’s to the right and rear of the main hall that you’ll find the two other Korean Treasures at the temple site. The first is the Five-Story Stone Pagoda at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #30. It’s believed that this pagoda was built during the 11th century. The pagoda is quite slender in design, and the top part, above the fourth story of the structure, is missing; thus, leaving only four of the five original stories of the stone structure. The core stone of the first story of the main body is very tall, while those above the second story are comparatively shorter in height. The edges of the pagoda’s core stones are engraved with a pillar pattern. And the upward curve along the bottom of the roof stone gives the pagoda a look of a wooden structure. In total, this pagoda stands 5.75 metres in height. And in 1968, a sari reliquary was discovered inside the pagoda during its renovation.

In front of the Five-Story Stone Pagoda at Manboksa Temple Site rests just three partial stories to a stone pagoda that formerly stood at Manboksa Temple. And to the rear of the five-story pagoda, and housed inside a protective wooden pavilion, is the final Korean Treasure to be explored on the temple site grounds. Housed inside the wooden pavilion is the Stone Standing Buddha at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #43. This image dedicated to the Buddha stands two metres in height, and it’s made from granite. There is some dispute among historians as to when the statue was first erected at Manboksa Temple. This image of the Buddha has a bald head, and it’s topped with an usnisa, which is a protruding part of the head that symbolizes supreme wisdom. This Buddha image also has a chubby oval face and features like the eyes, nose, and mouth that are natural in appearance. The right hand is held upward with the palm facing outwards. And the left hand of the image hangs down. Unfortunately, both hands are missing. As for the mandorla that surrounds the entire statue of the Buddha, the halo relief is carved with lotus petals and stems around the head, while the background features fiery reliefs. Near the shoulders of the Buddha are two accompanying smaller images of Buddhas on either side. The folds of the Buddha’s clothes are a bit clunky and unrefined. And on the backside of the mandorla is a relief of yet another Buddha.

To the rear of the protective wooden pavilion and the foundation for the main hall are three additional foundations probably for a lecture hall and dorms.

How To Get There

From the Namwon Intercity Bus Terminal, you can take Bus #4-101 or Bus #4-102 to get to the Manboksa-ji Temple Site. You’ll need to get off at the “Wangjeong-gyo stop” and then walk to the temple site. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk 5 minutes, or 340 metres, to get to the Manboksa-ji Temple Site.

You can take a bus or you can simply take a taxi from the Namwon Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride will last 5 minutes over 2.2 km.

Overall Rating: 6/10

Temple sites are always a bit tricky to rate because either you love them or you hate them. For me, rather obviously, I love them, so I rate them as highly as I do. In addition to the Manboksa-ji Temple Site being classified as a Historic Site, it’s also home to four Korean Treasures, which are all stunning in their own right. Sometimes you’ll go to a temple site, and there’s nothing but foundation stones remaining. This isn’t the case at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site. In addition to the four Korean Treasures, there are other features like the Manboksa-ji Seokinsang, the partial pagoda, and the seokdeung daeseok, as well. There’s definitely a lot to appreciate at the Manboksa-ji Temple Site.

The Manboksa-ji Seokinsang at the entry of the western side of the temple site. The Flagpole Supports at Manboksa Temple Site near the busy roadside. The view of the Manboksa-ji Temple Site from the foundation of the former entry gate. The western auxiliary hall foundation. In the centre rests this Stone Pedestal at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #31. A look towards the foundation of the five-story wooden pagoda and eastern auxiliary hall foundation, as well. The Five-Story Stone Pagoda at Manboksa Temple Site in the background with part of a pagoda in the foreground. A closer look at the Five-story Stone Pagoda at Manboksa Temple Site with the protective wooden pavilion in the background. The beautiful Stone Standing Buddha at Manboksa Temple Site, which is Korean Treasure #43, housed inside the protective wooden pavilion. The relief on the backside of the mandorla on the Stone Standing Buddha at Manboksa Temple Site. An up-close of the Stone Standing Buddha at Manboksa Temple Site. The view of the temple site from the main hall foundation. One more look up at the Manboksa-ji Seokinsang, or the “Manboksa-ji Stone Statue of a Man” in English, in the early morning light. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
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How this BTS member CREATED a Korean dialect | BTS Analyzed

Wed, 2023-02-08 15:28

After I did my first few episodes where I graded non-native Korean speakers in K-pop groups, many of you kept asking me to "grade" the BTS members. Since the BTS members are all native speakers, they speak Korean... well, like native speakers. So in this series I didn't "grade," but instead "analyzed" all 7 of the BTS members, starting with RM.

In this series I analyze how each of the members speak, including what common expressions they use, dialect, unique speech patterns, how they use politeness levels, and how their Korean sounds overall. There are 7 episodes (of course), and the first one is RM. Check it out here!

The post How this BTS member CREATED a Korean dialect | BTS Analyzed appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Foldable and Height adjustable bike

Wed, 2023-02-08 04:36
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan StationContact person by email Foldable bike for sale 

This foldable bike is for sale. It can be used by both adults and kids (seat & handle adjustable). Very less used. The asking price is 110,000 (Negotiable). Comes with a bike helmet, lock, and lights. 

 

image_50450177.JPG image_67220481.JPG
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Live Korean Class -- [Beginner] ~고 싶다 & ~래(요) "Want to"

Tue, 2023-02-07 23:40

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Liquid Arts Open Stage+39

Tue, 2023-02-07 11:49
Date: Tuesday, February 7, 2023 - 20:45Location: Event Type: 

From:  https://www.facebook.com/events/1239568936937677/

The Liquid Arts Open Stage is in its 23rd year providing performance opportunities to artists of all kinds in Busan and throughout the Korean Peninsula.

Poets, musicians, actors, comedians, dancers, filmmakers, and anyone with creative inclinations are invited to share their works with our attentive audience.

Early sign up can be done by sending an email to:

[email protected]

There will be 14 performance slots. 4 slots will be saved for walk-in performers.

Old school directions for those who need them: green line to stop 212 KSU/PKNU. Go up exit 3. Walk straight with Starbucks on your right. Turn right at the first street. Turn right at the next street. Turn right again at the first little alley. There’s a red Litre coffee shop on that corner. Walk straight back. It’s on the left.

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rotisserie/convection oven

Tue, 2023-02-07 07:00
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Contact person by email

hello-

can meet/deliver 9depending on location....

010 4432 2282 or message ok

60,000 won OBO

oven 2.jpg oven.jpg
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Templestay – Jikjisa Temple (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Sun, 2023-02-05 23:37
Jikjisa Temple in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Introduction to Temple

Jikjisa Temple is one of the oldest temples in Korea dating back to its founding in 418 A.D. by the monk Ado-hwasang. Jikjisa Temple is located in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do at the base of Mt. Hwangaksan (1111.3 m). The name of the temple means “Finger Pointing Temple” in English, and there are three theories as to how the temple got its name. The first states that after first seeing the location, Ado-hwasang pointed to a spot on the mountain and said that a large temple should be built at its base. The second story states that in 936 A.D., Master Neungyeo, while reconstructing the temple, instead of using a ruler to measure the land and the construction materials, used his hands to measure. And the third story refers to the Seon Buddhism teaching of “pointing directly” to the Original Mind (Buddha Nature). Whichever might be true (if any), they only add to the overall mystique of Jikjisa Temple.

While originally much smaller in size, the temple was later rebuilt and expanded by the famed Jajang-yulsa (590-658 A.D.) in 645 A.D. The temple, at this time, was expanded to an impressive forty buildings. Later, and during the reign of King Taejo of Joseon (r. 1392-1398), the temple grew in size, once more, making it the largest in Korea at this time. However, during the destructive Imjin War (1592-1598), numerous monks from Jikjisa Temple, known as the Righteous Army, took up arms to defend the Korean Peninsula. As reprisal, Jikjisa Temple was destroyed by the invading Japanese. In 1602, and after the war had come to an end, Jikjisa Temple was rebuilt; but this time, with only twenty buildings.

More recently, and up until the 1980’s, Jikjisa Temple underwent numerous rebuilds and reconstruction. Now, Jikjisa Temple is one of the eight largest temples in Korea. In total, Jikjisa Temple is home to four Korean Treasures and five surrounding hermitages.

Jikjisa Temple conducts a single Templestay program. This program is a one night, two day program that follows a rather loose schedule, which allows visitors greater time for introspection and relaxation.

For more on Jikjisa Temple.

Directions

From the Gimcheon Train Station, you can catch local buses to the temple. You can catch Bus #11, Bus #111, or Bus #112 from the Intercity Bus Terminal that’s to the right of the train station parking lot. The bus ride should take anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes to get to Jikjisa Temple. You can take a bus, or you can simply take a taxi. And if you’re traveling in a group, perhaps this is a better alternative. The taxi ride should cost about 15,000 won. From where the bus drops you off at the bus stop, the walk up to the temple takes about 15 minutes.

Templestay Program

Jikjisa Temple conducts a single Templestay program at their temple. It’s a one night, two day program entitled A Little Comma in Your Mind (Relaxing Type) Program. It’s a freer program with less organized activities than some other Templestay programs. Here’s their schedule:

A: A Little Comma in Your Mind (Relaxing Type) Program TimeTitle15:00-15:30Arrival15:30-16:00Orientation16:00-16:40Temple Tour17:00-17:30Dinner17:45-18:00Watching a Four Dharma Instruments Performance18:00-18:20Buddhist Ceremony19:00-21:00Free Time21:00-04:00Bedtime TimeTitle06:00-06:20Breakfast06:40-08:00Hiking or Taking a Walk Around the Temple.08:00-10:00Free Time10:00-11:00Tidying Up11:00-11:20Filling Out an Evaluation Form on Your Experience11:30-11:50Lunch12:00-12:00Departure

(This schedule is subject to change

The Templestay facilities at Jikjisa Temple. (Picture courtesy of the Templestay website). Temple Information

Address: 95 Jikjisa-gil, Daehang-myeon, Gimcheon-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Republic of Korea

Tel: 010-6356-6084

E-mail: [email protected]

Fees

A Little Comma in Your Mind (Relaxing Type) Program – adults – 60,000 won; students (up to 18 years of age) – 50,000 won; pre-schoolers – 30,000

*The cancellation policy is as follows: 7 days before: 100% refund; 4 days before: 60% refund; 2 days before: 30% refund; 1 day before the reservation date there is no refund.

Links

Reservations for A Little Comma in Your Mind (Relaxing Type) Program

The Taegeuk symbol on a temple shrine hall at Jikjisa Temple. —

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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English Teacher from London looking for teaching position in Busan

Sat, 2023-02-04 14:53
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Gwangan or Haeundae-guContact person by email

 

Hello, my name is Samuel Russom and I am a CELTA-certified English teacher.

 

I currently live and teach in London and am looking for a teaching position in Korea, Busan. Preferably near Gwangan or Haeundae-gu.

 

Before becoming a teacher I worked at AIG and some of my responsibilities were to teach, train and provide presentations. This was provided to employees within AIG and companies that worked with AIG in countries across the world. While people should never stop learning and growing my experience and the skills I have learned have helped me in the classroom. 

I communicate clearly and make sure that I grade my language to the level and age of the students. I have been taught and teach using the student-centered format and while trying to make sure my students learn as much as they can during the lesson I do make the lessons interactive, engaging, and interesting

 

I have taught teenagers, adults, and professionals in one-to-one sessions, but I am happy to teach all ages.

 

I do understand that I will need to learn and get used to Korean cultural but I am curious by nature, have visited Korea, and have friends that I have been talking to for a few years. During this time I have learned and come to enjoy and appreciate Korean culture and humor.

 

Due to my current contract, I can start in late April, but I will need sponsorship for my E2 visa. I am also studying Korean but 저는 한국말을 잘 못해요.

 

Preferences

Housing provided


Should you require further details, do not hesitate to contact me.

 

[email protected]

 

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TEXTBOOK Korean vs REAL Korean #2

Fri, 2023-02-03 15:30

Many were asking for a sequel to my first "Textbook Korean vs Real Korean" skit, so this time I met up with the Choi Sisters to deliver just that.

While all of the expressions shared are real, we also wanted to provide alternative, more natural versions (or at least more "casual" sounding alternatives) to each of our standard expressions. This isn't saying the standard way is wrong, only that it could be less natural or awkward when misused. If there's enough interest we could also do a part 3!

The post TEXTBOOK Korean vs REAL Korean #2 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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TEXTBOOK Korean vs REAL Korean #2

Fri, 2023-02-03 14:00

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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