Koreabridge

Subscribe to Koreabridge feed
Updated: 1 hour 25 min ago

Workshop with Emilie Roger - Impressionist landscape by acrylic

Tue, 2023-09-12 08:34
Date: Wednesday, September 27, 2023 - 19:00Location: Event Type: 

 Before impressionism, landscapes in art were often imaginary, perfect landscapes painted in the studio. The impressionists changed all that. They painted outdoors. As they were outside, they looked at how light and colour changed the scenes. They often painted thickly and used quick (and quite messy) brush strokes. (Tate gallery) We will try to re-create this technique in the comfort of the studio with a glass of wine or a drink of your choice. Join Emilie Roger for this amazing experience. Price: 35 000 won per person includes all the necessary equipment, paints and complimentary drink.

 아크릴로 만든 인상파 풍경 부산에 있으면서 영어 예술을 완성해보세요! 다문화 환경에서 아크릴 워크숍을 통해 인상주의 풍경에 참여해보세요! 인상주의 이전에는 예술 속 풍경은 종종 상상 속의 풍경이었고 스튜디오에서 그린 완벽한 풍경이었습니다. 인상파는 모든 것을 바꾸었습니다. 그들은 야외에서 그림을 그렸습니다. 그들은 밖에 있는 동안 빛과 색상이 장면을 어떻게 바꾸는지 살펴보았습니다. 그들은 종종 두껍게 칠하고 빠른(그리고 상당히 지저분한) 브러시 스트로크를 사용했습니다. (테이트 갤러리) 우리는 스튜디오에서 편안하게 와인 한 잔이나 선택한 음료와 함께 이 기술을 재현해 볼 것입니다. 이 놀라운 경험을 위해 Emilie Roger와 함께 하세요. 가격: 1인당 35,000원에는 필요한 모든 장비, 페인트, 무료 음료가 포함됩니다.

[email protected]

instagram.com/naughty.muse.studios/

naughtymusestudios.com/6/

IMG_7187 2.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Workshop with Emilie Roger - Impressionist landscape by acrylic

Tue, 2023-09-12 08:32
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

13 th Septemper (Wed) 19:00

27 th September (Wed) 19:00 

Before impressionism, landscapes in art were often imaginary, perfect landscapes painted in the studio. The impressionists changed all that. They painted outdoors. As they were outside, they looked at how light and colour changed the scenes. They often painted thickly and used quick (and quite messy) brush strokes. (Tate gallery) We will try to re-create this technique in the comfort of the studio with a glass of wine or a drink of your choice. Join Emilie Roger for this amazing experience. Price: 35 000 won per person includes all the necessary equipment, paints and complimentary drink.

 아크릴로 만든 인상파 풍경 부산에 있으면서 영어 예술을 완성해보세요! 다문화 환경에서 아크릴 워크숍을 통해 인상주의 풍경에 참여해보세요! 인상주의 이전에는 예술 속 풍경은 종종 상상 속의 풍경이었고 스튜디오에서 그린 완벽한 풍경이었습니다. 인상파는 모든 것을 바꾸었습니다. 그들은 야외에서 그림을 그렸습니다. 그들은 밖에 있는 동안 빛과 색상이 장면을 어떻게 바꾸는지 살펴보았습니다. 그들은 종종 두껍게 칠하고 빠른(그리고 상당히 지저분한) 브러시 스트로크를 사용했습니다. (테이트 갤러리) 우리는 스튜디오에서 편안하게 와인 한 잔이나 선택한 음료와 함께 이 기술을 재현해 볼 것입니다. 이 놀라운 경험을 위해 Emilie Roger와 함께 하세요. 가격: 1인당 35,000원에는 필요한 모든 장비, 페인트, 무료 음료가 포함됩니다.

[email protected]

instagram.com/naughty.muse.studios/

naughtymusestudios.com/6/

IMG_7187 2.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How NOT to Become a Korean Teacher

Mon, 2023-09-11 15:14

I've gone through a lot of ups and downs on my journey to become the Korean teacher I am today, and I've made a lot of mistakes. So I made this video to help highlight some of the mistakes that I made, in order to help anyone else who's interested in teaching Korean. Let me know if I've missed something!

The post How NOT to Become a Korean Teacher appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

BGN Eye Hospital Autumn review event

Mon, 2023-09-11 05:15
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan

Plan to have surgery at BGN this autumn?

Than share you experience with us and get special benefits!

Share your BGN experience in small video review and get 100,000 KRW additional discount for all surgeries and after-surgery eye drops package FREE of charge!

Review event can be used together with Autumn event!

No more doubts, contact us today to book your FREE LASIK consultation and make your first step to clear vision!

Contact us at:

Phone: 010-7670-3995

kakao: eye1004bgnbusan

Email: [email protected]

25.08.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Seokjongsa Temple – 석종사 (Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do)

Sun, 2023-09-10 23:39
Seokjongsa Temple in Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do. Temple History

Seokjongsa Temple is located in the southeastern part of Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Namsan (635.5 m). Originally the land that Seokjongsa Temple now occupies was Jukjangsa Temple. Jukjangsa Temple was first established sometime between Unified Silla (668-935) to early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Until the end of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), Jukjangsa Temple was a popular temple. At the end of the Joseon Dynasty, and already with centuries of anti-Buddhist policies in place by successive Joseon governments and courts, the status of the temple (like all temples in Korea) had been severely weakened. So Reverend Jo Gyeongro of Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do arrived at the temple during late-Joseon and destroyed the temple completely. Parts of Jukjangsa Temple were then used to help construct other structures throughout the Chungju area. Additionally, and during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45), Japanese authorities further raided the artifacts that still remained on the temple grounds. All that was left of the former temple, besides rubble, was a single five-story stone pagoda. And the land that Jukjangsa Temple formerly occupied became private property.

In 1985, the monk Geuma-hyeguk purchased 800 pyeong (2,645 m2) of land that had once been Jukjangsa Temple. The purchased of this land was the start of Seokjongsa Temple’s founding. Now, Seokjongsa Temple is 10,000 pyeong (33,058 m2) of land. In total, there are now 21 buildings that occupy this land.

Temple Layout

You’ll pass through a stately Iljumun Gate at the entry of the temple grounds. Eventually, you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot near the Temple Stay building. There are two trails that head north towards the upper courtyard at Seokjongsa Temple. The first of these two trails is closer to the Temple Stay building, while the other is closer to the Bowol-dang Hall. Whichever trail you take, they both lead past a semi-hidden pond with lotus flowers in bloom.

Beyond this pond, and framing the lower temple grounds, is the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion. To the left of this pavilion is a modern five-story pagoda. And to the right of this entry pavilion is the Beomjong-gak Pavilion. Housed inside this bell pavilion are four of the traditional Buddhist percussion instrument. A particular highlight inside this bell pavilion is the blue dragon-faced Mokeo (Wooden Fish Drum). Back at the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion, and before mounting the stone stairs, you’ll notice a pair of stone lions on either side of the stairs. The first story of the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion acts as an entry to the main temple courtyard at Seokjongsa Temple, while the second acts as a lecture hall for dharma halls.

Stepping inside the main temple courtyard at Seokjongsa Temple, you’ll find numerous buildings lining the courtyard. However, there are really only two that visitors can explore at the temple, and they are to the north. But before visiting these two shrine halls, you’ll notice the Gamno-gak Pavilion (Sweet Dew Pavilion) in the centre of the temple courtyard. This sunken wooden pavilion has fresh, clear mountain water passing through it and can be quite a refreshing break on a hot day.

Mounting another long set of stone stairs, you’ll now be face-to-face with a large Daeung-jeon Hall. The Daeung-jeon Hall was built on the site of the former location of the main hall to Jukjangsa Temple. The exterior walls to the main hall are adorned with large panel paintings dedicated to the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) and vibrant dancheong colours. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll find a wonderfully ornate interior with a beautiful triad of statues on the main altar. In the centre of this triad is Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). The weight of the large canopy above this triad is supported by large pillars adorned with swirling dragons. Rounding out the interior to the Daeung-jeon Hall is a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the left rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the Samseong-gak Hall. The exterior walls to this hall are adorned with various murals that include a ferocious tiger, peaches, and red pine trees. Stepping inside this rather strangely organized interior, you’ll find two beautiful murals dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) and Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). Both paintings were created by the same artist. Of note is the rather startled-looking tiger in the painting of Sanshin. The third, and final, mural inside the Samseong-gak Hall can be accessed through a doorway inside the shaman shrine hall, where you’ll find a lone mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Again, this painting was created by the same artist as those who created the other two shaman murals. All three are a wonderful and masterful depictions of these three shaman deities.

Finally, and to the left of the Samseong-gak Hall and up a trail, you’ll find an outdoor shrine dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise).

How To Get There

From the Chungju Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #101, Bus #103, Bus #105, Bus 106, Bus #111, or Bus #112. You’ll need to get off at the “Samwon Elementary School stop.” From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk about 300 metres, or 5 minutes, and make your way to the Muhak-sijang Market and the “Muhak-sijang bus stop.” From this stop, you’ll need to catch Bus #550. This bus doesn’t come often. You’ll then need to take this second bus for 13 stops, or 17 minutes, and get off at the “Seokjong stop.” From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk about 700 metres, or 10 minutes, to get to Seokjongsa Temple.

And if public transportation isn’t your thing, you can simply take a taxi from the Chungju Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride will be 8.1 km, or 20 minutes, and it’ll cost you about 8,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 7/10

While Seokjongsa Temple is quite large in size, it’s only filled with a handful of structures and shrine halls that visitors can explore. With that being said, the Gamno-gak Pavilion is a beautiful stand-out, as is the interior of the Daeung-jeon Hall and the artwork that fills the Samseong-gak Hall. Seokjongsa Temple is beautifully situated to the south of Mt. Namsan; and as a total package, it’s quite a beautiful visit.

The pond at Seokjongsa Temple. The Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion. The Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion from a different angle. The book-ending stone lions and five-story pagoda in front of the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion. The Beomjong-gak Pavilion to the right of the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion. The signboard over the entrance to the Cheoncheok-ru Pavilion. The Gamno-gak Pavilion and Daeung-jeon Hall. The crystal clear mountain water that pours into the Gamno-gak Pavilion. A look up at the Daeung-jeon Hall and the book-ending haetae on either side of the stone stairs leading up to the main hall. The Daeung-jeon Hall. The amazing Daeung-jeon Hall dancheong colours and summer sky. Two of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha) murals that adorn the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. A look inside the ornate interior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall at Seokjongsa Temple. The Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural inside the Samseong-gak Hall. Joined by this mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Spirit). One last look at the beautiful summer sky and the Daeung-jeon Hall together at Seokjongsa Temple.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Water Rower

Sun, 2023-09-10 12:52
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Delivery Available to the greater Busan area

Apollo AR Water Rowing Machine from First Degree Fitness (used maybe 30 times, sadly)

Original price: ₩ 2,500,000

Retails (new) for: ₩1,790,000 

Asking price: ₩700,000

Can deliver. Instruction manual, cleaning tablets, distilled water, hex keys, and pump included. Stores upright to save space. Everything important is like-new (tank, seal, cord, wheels, etc all solid) except the monitor (the sensor either in the tank or somewhere along the line is faulty), but honestly a phone (clipped to the top or side of the rower) is better anyways.

Website purchased from:

http://m.daehosports.com/product/water%EB%A1%9C%EC%9E%89%EB%A8%B8%EC%8B%... 

English specs:

https://fdflimited.com/shop/support-only/horizontal-apollo-hybrid-ar-ind... 

English video:

https://youtu.be/3O0LRLfLFWg?si=QB3wKy4MXebcRY1Z 

 

노젓기 운동을 집에서 할수있게 고안된 운동기구입니다. 수압의 저항을 통해 전신의 근육을 강화시켜줍니다. 

운동시에 물젓는 소리가 화이트 노이즈의 효과가 있어 너무 평화로워요. 

수압 조절 가능, 노젓은 거리 및 시간 기록 가능 

노젓는 운동으로 전신의 운동 효과

특히 허벅지, 엉덩이가 터질것같이 벌크업 되고 허리 근육 강화로 허리가 튼튼해니다! 

남성분은 물론 과격한 운동이 부담스러우신 여성분 어르신들도 무리없이 운동 하실수 있는 홈트의 최고봉 운동기구입니다. 

궁금하신거 있으시면 부담없이 연락주세요. 

단, 직접배송이라 가격 내고는 힘드니 양해바랍니다.

https://youtu.be/__mqbIlrV2w?si=zaQXsWW6erjC2It5 

20230820_132731.jpg 1395_shop1_667096.jpg 20230820_135159.jpg 20230820_134259.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Fans

Sun, 2023-09-10 07:21
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Nangmin-dong, Dongnae-gu

Hello- Two basic fans for sale.

15,000 each.

Message me 010•5775•1956

20230909_153505.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Photography Classes at the Ulsan Foreigner Support Center

Sun, 2023-09-10 02:34

Jason Teale 

Photographer, educator, podcaster

Podcast    Website    Instagram

Photographing Korea and the world beyond!

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Building and Enhancing Photography Communities in Korea: A Journey of Support and Growth

Sat, 2023-09-09 12:46

by Jason Teale, Host of the Sajin Photography Podcast

Introduction

Hello, fellow photography enthusiasts, and welcome to another captivating post on the Sajin Photography blog. Today, I’m thrilled to delve into a topic that holds a special place in my heart – the evolution and empowerment of photography communities right here in Korea.

Setting the Scene

Over the years, these communities have undergone a remarkable transformation. What once served as vibrant hubs for insightful conversations have, to some extent, transitioned into platforms predominantly utilized for seeking answers and promoting events. In this post, we’ll explore strategies to reignite the spark of camaraderie within these communities.

Cultivating a Healthy Community

The essence of revitalizing these communities lies in nurturing a thriving ecosystem, rather than merely accumulating followers. I’ve observed a trend where new groups emerge, attempting to attract members by diverting them from existing communities. Let me share an intriguing incident – a group of photographers joined the Lightstalkers community I co-manage, but their perception shifted when they discovered we organized complimentary photowalks.

The Tale of Lightstalkers Photowalks

I extended an olive branch, proposing a collaborative effort where they could utilize Lightstalkers to plan their paid photowalks. This proposition aimed at harnessing our already-established member base. Surprisingly, their response wasn’t one of unity, but instead, they accused us of hidden agendas and departed, leaving negativity in their wake. Their intent seemed far from community-building, leaning more towards exploitation.

Spotting Self-Centered Patterns

This pattern isn’t isolated. We’ve encountered individuals within these groups who ardently voice opinions yet hesitate to take constructive action. In my personal photography group for Ulsan and Daegu, there were voices demanding more events in Daegu. However, these demands were accompanied by silence when it came to organizing such events. This disparity left Daegu members with limited opportunities, despite the vocal concern for more events.

Transitioning Towards Positivity

Let’s pivot from negativity to a positive transformation. How can we genuinely uplift these communities? It begins with a fundamental principle – assisting one another.

Contributing and Letting Go of Ego

Our tendencies often lead us to voice grievances without engaging in proactive actions. The responsibility of organization shouldn’t fall solely on one individual. This challenge becomes even more formidable considering the full-time commitments and familial responsibilities many foreigners juggle. Equally important is shedding our egos and purging toxic attitudes. Even I grapple with this – negativity can be alluring. Remember, fewer clashes of ego can only nurture the community.

The Hazard of Toxic Mindsets

Photography groups can suffer severely due to toxic attitudes and a lack of participation. The fear of criticism prevents new members or photographers from sharing their work, especially if they’ve witnessed derisive comments on others’ photos. To foster an environment of growth, we must champion one another and create a space that encourages creative expression.

Support and Encouragement as the Backbone

At the core, my emphasis rests on the bedrock of support – the very foundation upon which robust communities are constructed.

Sharing and Collaborating for Growth

Recent experiences have humbled me. Friends and colleagues have come to my aid in remarkable ways. Consider the case of my interview with Phillip Brett, who created an astonishing video showcasing my documentation of Ulsan. Phillip’s gesture of support and focus on community members actively contributing is a testament to the change we need.

The Bottomline

In closing, dear readers, I’ve shared my insights, my two cents. As we embrace the upcoming fall season, I encourage you to stay inspired. Until we reconvene, keep capturing those breathtaking moments through your lens and continue to preserve the beauty that we see everyday living here in Korea.

The post Building and Enhancing Photography Communities in Korea: A Journey of Support and Growth appeared first on The Sajin.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

looking for a Drummer

Sat, 2023-09-09 00:07
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

We(Rock Band) are looking for a Drummer.
We play mostly Nirvana songs once a week for fun.

Call or text me(010-9683-6900)

Thanks.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

September'23. New round of printmaking!

Thu, 2023-09-07 23:52
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Songjeong beach

New month. New round of printmaking!

Naughty Muse Studio 

Sign up for basic printmaking, if you missed last month. Next month we will move to a more advanced level.

5th of September- basic screen printing

12th of September - basic linocut print

19th of September - basic monotype print

26th of September - basic drypoint print 

If you book all 4 basic printmaking sessions you will have one free visit to the studio to experiment mastering your skills further on your own.

These sessions are open and beneficial to both professional and amateur artists.

Price: 50 000 won per session / 180 000 won for 4 sessions (price includes all necessary equipment + complimentary drink)

Book your (limited) spot: 

tel:+821052462873

IMG_6712.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How to Talk Dirty in Korean

Thu, 2023-09-07 14:46

In over 10 years of teaching Korean, I've never once been asked to make this sort of video. But it needed to be done, and Gillian 쌤 was the one who helped me make it.

The post How to Talk Dirty in Korean appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site – 자빈신사지 사사자 구층석탑 (Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do)

Wed, 2023-09-06 23:43
The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” in Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do. Pagoda History

The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is located in the southern foothills of Mt. Malmoesan (688.6 m) and along Dongsan Valley near a river in Jecheon, Chungcheongbuk-do. According to the inscription on the base, the pagoda was first erected in 1022 in the early part of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Additionally, the pagoda is located on the former Binsinsa-ji Temple Site. The pagoda was originally built to help prevent another invasion by the Khitan. In total, there had already been three invasions that took place in 993 A.D., 1010, and 1018-1019 during the Goryeo–Khitan War. So it’s rather obvious why Goryeo would do anything and everything to prevent another destructive incursion by the Khitan.

The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is Korean Treasure #94; and if it could be argued that a Korean Treasure should be a National Treasure, it’s probably this pagoda.

The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” in 1921. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Pagoda Design

You first approach the pagoda up a set of uneven stone stairs. The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is located in a clearing next to country homes. This pagoda, at least a first glance, looks similar to the “Four Lion Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Hwaeomsa Temple.” However, the pagoda at Hwaeomsa Temple is significantly larger in size than this one. While Hwaeomsa Temple pagoda stands 7.1 metres in height, this pagoda is 4.5 metres in height. Another key difference is that the “Four Lion Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Hwaeomsa Temple” dates back to the seventh to mid-eighth century, while the “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” dates back to 1022.

Overall, the “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” consists of a base, a four-story main body supported by four lions, and a roof stone. The base of the pagoda is comprised of three distinct stones. The lowest part of the pagoda is a foundation stone. Above this is a smaller square stone with carvings of lotus flowers on it (three each on the four sides of the pagoda). And above this stone is an even smaller stone with an inscription on it. This inscription indicates when and why the pagoda was initially made.

Above these base stones is the most unique feature of the pagoda: the four lions that support the weight of the upper portion of the pagoda. The four lions are meant to represent the four human emotions of anger, joy, sorrow and love. The four lions are far more compact than the rather elongated images of the “Four Lion Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Hwaeomsa Temple.” All four at the Jecheon pagoda are well preserved. And at the centre of the pagoda, instead of a monkish-figure like at Hwaeomsa, the central image to the “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). Like the lions, the image of Birojana-bul is compact and a little chubby. The statue of Birojana-bul presents the “Wisdom Fist” mudra (ritualized hand gesture). And above the image of Birojana-bul is a beautiful stone relief of a lotus flower.

A single flat square rests atop the heads of the four lions. And above this thin flat stone are four body stones. Originally, the pagoda stood nine stories in height, but the centuries have removed five of these stories. In addition, the finial to the pagoda is long gone.

How To Get There

The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is located in one of the more remote parts of Korea. As a result, the best way to get to the pagoda is by car. But if you don’t own your own car, taxi is the next best choice over a two and a half bus ride; however, the taxi ride isn’t cheap. From the Chungju Bus Terminal, to get to the “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site,” it’ll cost you 40,000 won (one way) over 33 km.

Overall Rating: 4/10

The pagoda is a wonderful example of Korean Buddhist artistry in the same tradition of pagodas as those found at Hwaeomsa Temple and the “Four Lion Three-Story Stone Pagoda in Gwaeseok-ri.” While not as grand as the one found at Hwaeomsa Temple, the “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” is wonderfully preserved. In addition, it has a rather surprising statue of Birojana-bul at the heart of the pagoda. The lions are fierce and the location is beautiful.

The small river that flows out in front of the pagoda in Dongsan Valley. As you first approach the pagoda. The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” as you first approach it. A different look. The inscription at the base of the pagoda that indicates when it was built and how many stories it once stood. At the centre of the four lions is this statue of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). An up-close of Birojana-bul under a stone relief of a lotus flower. One of the four lions that supports the weight of the pagoda with Birojana-bul in the background. The “Four Lion Nine-Story Stone Pagoda at Sajabinsinsa Temple Site” from behind. The backside of Birojana-bul. A look up at four of the nine still remaining body stones. And two of the four lions.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

The Many, Many Ways to Say “RICE” | Korean FAQ

Mon, 2023-09-04 15:21

"Rice" is a word that might be difficult to translate into Korean, only because there are so many different ways to translate it depending on what type of rice you mean. For example, you might call uncooked rice 쌀, and cooked rice 밥, and different words for different types of rice. Here are all of the most important ones I've found, and which you should definitely learn.

The post The Many, Many Ways to Say “RICE” | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Volunteering at English Cafe for Language and Culture Exchange in Busan

Mon, 2023-09-04 10:23
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: 

Volunteering at English Cafe for Language and Culture Exchange in Busan

Welcome to LanCul, a global community in Busan, South Korea. LanCul is the best place to meet Korean friends and experience Korean cultures. Our place is for foreign travelers who want to meet Korean friends and share their ideas and cultures. Our community provides warm and lively space to Korean and foreign community members to interact each other. They can also share their experience and information as well.

● English Conversation Position (minimum 1 month ~ maximum 3 months)
- Fluent English speaking and willing to help Korean members improve their English
- Love meeting new friends and interacting with them
- Enjoy new cultures and sharing their ideas and experiences


● Cleaning Position (minimum 1 month ~ maximum 3 months)
- Good at keeping things organized and clean
- Interested in learning English and Korean language
- Love meeting new people and interacting with them

● Internship Position ( for long-term volunteers)
If you plan to stay in Korea longer time. You can apply for internship position, which is more managing our English conversation program and our community.

You can apply through following link :


http://lzonekorea.com/volunteering_in_korea.html

KakaoTalk_20230725_213759976_02.jpg KakaoTalk_20230725_213621203.jpg KakaoTalk_20230725_213759976_01.jpg KakaoTalk_20230725_213621203_22.jpg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Colonial Korea – Jikjisa Temple

Mon, 2023-09-04 01:49
Two Monks in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall and next to a Stone Lantern at Jikjisa Temple. (Picture Courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple History

Jikjisa Temple, which means “Finger Pointing Temple” in English, sits at the base of Mt. Hwangaksan (1111.3m) in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple is scenically located with quiet forests, towering mountain peaks, and rolling streams. According to temple legend, Jikjisa Temple was built in 418 A.D. by the monk Ado-hwasang. There are three theories as to how the temple got its name. The first states that after first seeing the location, Ado-hwasang pointed to a spot on the mountain and said that a large temple should be built at its base. The second story states that in 936 A.D., Master Neungyeo, while reconstructing the temple, instead of using a ruler to measure the land and the construction materials, used his hands to measure. And the third story refers to Seon Buddhism teaching and “pointing directly” to the Original Mind (Buddha Nature).

As for Ado-hwasang, he was a famed missionary from the Goguryeo Kingdom (37 B.C. – 668 A.D.). He’s sometimes credited with first introducing Buddhism to the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). Buddhism was formally accepted in the Silla Kingdom in 527 A.D., but this didn’t stop Ado-hwasang from helping to introduce and popularize Buddhism inside the Silla borders. If true, and the temple does in fact date back to 418 A.D., it makes Jikjisa Temple one of the oldest temples on the Korean Peninsula.

While originally much smaller in size, the temple was later rebuilt and expanded by Jajang-yulsa (590-658 A.D.) in 645 A.D. during the reign of Queen Seondeok (r.632-647 A.D.). The temple was expanded to an amazing forty buildings. During King Taejo of Joseon’s reign, from 1392 to 1398, the temple became the largest in East Asia. However, during the extremely destructive Imjin War (1592-98), numerous military monks from Jikjisa Temple, known as the Righteous Army, took up armed resistance against the invading Japanese. As a reprisal, Jikjisa Temple was burned to the ground by the Japanese. In 1602, after the war, Jikjisa Temple was rebuilt; but this time, with only twenty buildings (half of its former size). Throughout the centuries, the temple has been expanded numerous times up until the 1980’s. Now, Jikjisa Temple is one of the eight largest temples in Korea, and its grounds are home to an additional five hermitages. Jikjisa Temple is home to five Korean Treasures.

Colonial Era Photography

It should be noted that one of the reasons that the Japanese took so many pictures of Korean Buddhist temples during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945) was to provide images for tourist photos and illustrations in guidebooks, postcards, and photo albums for Japanese consumption. They would then juxtapose these images of “old Korea” with “now” images of Korea. The former category identified the old Korea with old customs and traditions through grainy black-and-white photos.

These “old Korea” images were then contrasted with “new” Korea images featuring recently constructed modern colonial structures built by the Japanese. This was especially true for archaeological or temple work that contrasted the dilapidated former structures with the recently renovated or rebuilt Japanese efforts on the old Korean structures contrasting Japan’s efforts with the way that Korea had long neglected their most treasured of structures and/or sites.

This visual methodology was a tried and true method of contrasting the old (bad) with the new (good). All of this was done to show the success of Japan’s “civilizing mission” on the rest of the world and especially on the Korean Peninsula. Furthering this visual propaganda was supplemental material that explained the inseparable nature found between Koreans and the Japanese from the beginning of time. 

To further reinforce this point, the archaeological “rediscovery” of Japan’s antiquity in the form of excavated sites of beautifully restored Silla temples and tombs found in Japanese photography was the most tangible evidence for the supposed common ancestry both racially and culturally. As such, the colonial travel industry played a large part in promoting this “nostalgic” image of Korea as a lost and poor country, whose shared cultural and ethnic past was being restored to prominence once more through the superior Japanese and their “enlightened” government. And Jikjisa Temple played a large part in the the propagation of this propaganda, especially since it played such a prominent role in Korean Buddhist history and culture. Here are a collection of Colonial era pictures of Jikjisa Temple through the years.

Pictures of Colonial Era Jikjisa Temple Specific Dates Unknown (1909-1945) The Jahamun Gate at Jikjisa Temple. (All pictures courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). A foundation stone from Jikjisa Temple. The Daeung-jeon Hall. A look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Why do we live in SOUTH KOREA and not CANADA? ----|---- International couple's dilemma

Sun, 2023-09-03 23:22

As a Korean/Canadian couple living in Seoul, one of the most common questions we get asked is: "Why do you choose to live in Korea and not Canada?". As an international couple, choosing which partner's country you're going to live in is never easy. We talk about some main reasons Korea is currently the right fir for us.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

00:00 - Intro
01:30 - Reason 1
03:24 - Reason 2
05:24 - Reason 3
07:04 - Reason 4
11:46 - Reason 5
13:03 - Answering your questions (from Instagram)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

✨ The 'Sarah Earrings' (designed by Sarah): https://analuisa.pxf.io/c/4456819/174... 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

♫ MUSIC 

All music in our videos is from 'Epidemic Sound'. Our Affiliate Link for a FREE 30-day trial: http://share.epidemicsound.com/qh2Tz  

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

♥ Support our channel on PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/2hearts1seoul
♥ Support our channel & Stray Kitties via 'YouTube Membership': 
   / @2hearts1seoul  
♥ Support our channel and stray kitties by buying us a one-time 'coffee' ☕ https://ko-fi.com/2hearts1seoul

■ INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/2hearts1seoul/
■ BEEMO’S INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/im_beemo
■ KYUHO’S INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/qdiary
■ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/2hearts1seoul
■ WEBSITE: https://www.2hearts1seoul.com

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Our Amazon Store (home items etc. that appear in our videos)   https://www.amazon.com/shop/2hearts1seoul

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

FTC: This video is not sponsored. We sometimes have links in the description box which we make a small commission from. This helps support our channel, at no extra cost to you, of course!

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Important Hanja: Find Your 도 (道) (한자) | Korean FAQ

Sun, 2023-09-03 23:20

It's time for another Hanja episode! (I have more of these Hanja lessons on the way). This time I'll be explaining how to use the Hanja 道 (도), which means a "way" or a "road." Where have you seen this Hanja used before?

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Korean classes in September!

Fri, 2023-09-01 03:58
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: pnu haeundae seomyon ksu bsu jangsan

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

 

IMG_4553.JPG

Busan's Korean Language Institute For Foreigners (KLIFF) is offering classes for everyone.  Make a change by learning Korean this season.  The teachers at KLIFF can help!

Think it takes a year to speak Korean well?  Think again!  In just a  month we can get you speaking with the locals! 

KLIFF is located in two convenient locations: PNU and Haeundae. 

We have as many as 9 levels of Korean ability for you to choose from.  We also offer special lectures targeted toward the Korean proficiency test.

We're open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and available Sunday, too!

Questions or need directions?  Feel free to call us any time at 010-9108-6594, or email to [email protected].  You can also check us out at www.kliff.co.kr
See the map below to our PNU location, call or see our website for Haeundae classes.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Colonial Korea – Muwisa Temple

Fri, 2023-09-01 00:25
The Geukrakbo-jeon Hall at Muwisa Temple during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45). (All Pictures Courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple History

Muwisa Temple is located in the southern portion of the picturesque Wolchulsan National Park in Gangjin, Jeollanam-do. According to both the Cultural Hermitage Administration website and the Muwisa Sajeok, or “The History of Muwisa Temple” in English, the temple was first built in 617 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). It was named Gwaneumsa Temple (The Bodhisattva of Compassion Temple). But this is hard to believe for a couple of reasons. First, Wonhyo-daesa would have been just a one year old when he first built Muwisa Temple. Additionally, Wonhyo-daesa was a Silla monk. The Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) was in open conflict, and eventual war, with the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.), which is where Muwisa Temple was located.

What is perhaps more plausible, but still questioned by some, is that Muwisa Temple was first established by Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.) in 875 A.D. At this time, the temple was called Galoksa Temple. Whatever the case may be, Muwisa Temple was definitely established by the early 10th century by Seongak-daesa (864-917). Muwisa Temple grew into a major Seon Buddhist temple in the early part of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392).

Before the 10th century, the name of the temple changed once more, this time, to Muwigapsa Temple, and it became a Seon temple. Later on, the temple would become a Cheontae temple with the growing popularity of the Cheontae teachings in the 11th century. According to the Muwisa Sajeok, or “The History of Muwisa Temple” in English, Muwisa Temple fell into disrepair and was rebuilt and renamed Suryuksa Temple, which literally means “Water Land Temple” in English. The reason for this change of name is that historians believe that the temple became a site for the ceremony for the rites of the dead known as the “Suryuk-je – 수륙재” in Korean. This is a Buddhist ritual to help console the spirits of the dead. Specifically, it was a ritual for the war dead, both friendly and foe, that couldn’t reincarnate. This helps to explain why the main hall, the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall, at Muwisa Temple is dedicated to Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). The present Geukrakbo-jeon Hall was built in 1430 A.D.

In 1550, during the mid-Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple was rebuilt and renamed Muwisa Temple by the monk Taegam. Tragically, Muwisa Temple was destroyed, in part, by fire during the Imjin War (1592-1598). Fortunately, the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall was spared.

In 1934, the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall became National Treasure #13 during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945). And in 1974, after years of only having a handful of temple buildings, new construction took place at Muwisa Temple. In total, Muwisa Temple is home to two National Treasures and an additional four Korean Treasures.

Colonial Era Photography

It should be noted that one of the reasons that the Japanese took so many pictures of Korean Buddhist temples during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-1945) was to provide images for tourist photos and illustrations in guidebooks, postcards, and photo albums for Japanese consumption. They would then juxtapose these images of “old Korea” with “now” images of Korea. The former category identified the old Korea with old customs and traditions through grainy black-and-white photos.

These “old Korea” images were then contrasted with “new” Korea images featuring recently constructed modern colonial structures built by the Japanese. This was especially true for archaeological or temple work that contrasted the dilapidated former structures with the recently renovated or rebuilt Japanese efforts on the old Korean structures contrasting Japan’s efforts with the way that Korea had long neglected their most treasured of structures and/or sites.

This visual methodology was a tried and true method of contrasting the old (bad) with the new (good). All of this was done to show the success of Japan’s “civilizing mission” on the rest of the world and especially on the Korean Peninsula. Furthering this visual propaganda was supplemental material that explained the inseparable nature found between Koreans and the Japanese from the beginning of time. 

To further reinforce this point, the archaeological “rediscovery” of Japan’s antiquity in the form of excavated sites of beautifully restored Silla temples and tombs found in Japanese photography was the most tangible evidence for the supposed common ancestry both racially and culturally. As such, the colonial travel industry played a large part in promoting this “nostalgic” image of Korea as a lost and poor country, whose shared cultural and ethnic past was being restored to prominence once more through the superior Japanese and their “enlightened” government. And Muwisa Temple played a part in the propagation of this propaganda, especially since it played such a prominent role in Korean Buddhist history and culture. Here are a collection of Colonial era pictures of Muwisa Temple through the years.

Pictures of Colonial Era Muwisa Temple 1932 The Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. (All pictures courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). A look up at the eaves. And another look up at the eaves and outside crumbling walls. A look inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall at the main altar which is a Korean Treasure, the Seated Amitabha Buddha Triad of Muwisa Temple. A closer look at the Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) statue. A closer look at the Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) statue. And a closer look at the Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) statue on the main altar. The sumidan (main altar) that supports the Seated Amitabha Buddha Triad of Muwisa Temple. Rather uniquely, the main altar doesn’t have a datjib (canopy); instead, it has this twisting dragon mural above the main altar. A look at some of the murals inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall that are considered a Korean Treasure, the Mural Paintings in Geungnakjeon Hall of Muwisa Temple. And the Mural Painting in Geungnakjeon Hall of Muwisa Temple, Gangjin (Amitabha Buddha Triad), which is a National Treasure. A look around the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. Pictures of Colonial Era Muwisa Temple 1934 The amazing main altar inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall at Muwisa Temple. A look around the main hall at some of the amazing murals. Another look at the Mural Paintings in Geungnakjeon Hall of Muwisa Temple. And another look at the Mural Painting in Geungnakjeon Hall of Muwisa Temple, Gangjin (Amitabha Buddha Triad). Another Korean Treasure at Muwisa Temple, the Stele for Buddhist Monk Seongak at Muwisa Temple. A tilted three-story pagoda at Muwisa Temple. Pictures of Colonial Era Muwisa Temple Specific Dates Unknown (1909-1945) A stone wall in front of the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. A look over the stone wall at the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. The signboard to the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. Some of the murals inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. A look up at the ceiling inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. Some more of the murals inside the Geukrakbo-jeon Hall. The tilted three-story pagoda at Muwisa Temple. The Stele for Buddhist Monk Seongak at Muwisa Temple. The Stele for Buddhist Monk Seongak at Muwisa Temple cleaned-up.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Pages