Worldbridges Megafeed

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BGN Eye Hospital summer event 2024

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-05-28 07:06
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan

Dive into clear vision this summer with BGN Eye Hospital laser vision correction event!

Get maximum discounts up to 300,000 KRW for all types of laser vision correction!

LASEK/LASIK will start as low as 1,400,000 KRW ( both eyes)

SMILE will start from only 2,300,000 KRW ( both eyes)

SMILE PRO ( the newest technology) will start only from 4,000,000 KRW (both eyes)

Don`t miss this great opportunity to get rid of your glasses this summer and save on laser vision correction!

Not sure if you are a candidate for laser vision correction? No worries, as BGN Eye Hospital provides FREE examination and consultation for everyone who considers laser vision correction!

Contact us today and book a FREE examination and consultation.

Phone: 010-7670-3995

kakao: eye1004bgnbusan

Email: [email protected]

Summer event 2024.png
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

When to Use Pure Korean or Sino Korean Numbers | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-27 21:43

Ever wondered whether to use Sino Korean numbers (일, 이, 삼...) or Pure Korean numbers (하나, 둘, 셋...) when counting something? In this newest episode I share some tips for knowing which to use, and how you can more easily tell whether to use Pure Korean or Sino Korean numbers.

The post When to Use Pure Korean or Sino Korean Numbers | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

LRQA

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-27 13:21
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://www.lrqa.com/ko-kr/

LRQA offers top-tier BRCGS certification services in Korea, leveraging our global expertise in food safety, brand assurance, and supply chain transformation. Partner with us to ensure compliance, enhance risk management, and drive sustainable business growth

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

LRQA

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-27 13:21
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://www.lrqa.com/ko-kr/

LRQA offers top-tier BRCGS certification services in Korea, leveraging our global expertise in food safety, brand assurance, and supply chain transformation. Partner with us to ensure compliance, enhance risk management, and drive sustainable business growth

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Zen Clinic Centum City, Busan

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-27 01:37
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://www.zenclinic.co.kr/

Zen Clinic & The Zen Clinic in Busan is a clean, state of the art modern skin + plastic surgery clinic located in Centum City, Busan. We offer many services and would like the foreign community to know that you have a place to go if you are looking for treatments to better improve yourself.

We are able to accommodate you in English and are offering special deals for foreigners:)

Zen & The Zen Clinic May events (korea won)

Period: Until May 31st
Target: Customers visiting Zen Clinic

Unlimited 365 days a year (korea won)

Wrinkle Botox
1. Wondertalks - 40.000
2. Xeomin - 80.000

Chin Botox
1. Wondertalks - 90.000
2. Xeomin - 180.000

Philtrum or armpit hair removal
1. Ally - 50.000
2. Apogiel Apple - 150.000

✅Ulthermage (korea won)
Authenticity of product/ gift of genuine product tip / sleep possible

1. Thermage FLX 600 shots - 1.890.000
2. Thermage FLX 600 shots + Ulthera 300 shots
+ LDM + Skin Botox + Rejuran Healer - 2.500.000
3. Sleep Ultherapy 300 shots + Skin Botox - 800.000
4. Ulthera 300 shots Ball newer 300 shots - 1.000.000

✅Natural beauty, gen plastic surgery (korea won)
eye
1. Burial + nose filler - 500.000
2. Under-eye fat relocation - 750.000

3. Nasolabial fold or chin implant - 890.000
4. Autologous fat grafting -1.500.000

Breast Augmentation
1. Harvest 2 Fat Grafting - 2.7900000
2. Mento Smooth - 4.500.000
3. Mentor Extra- 8.800.000

Liposuction
1. Arm suction + 5 aftercare sessions - 2.500.000
2. Abdomen & flanks + 5 aftercare sessions - 3.500.000

✅ 3, 4, 5 thousand won in March, April, May (korea won)
1. Red injection - 30.000
2. Acne care - 30.000
3. Whitening toning + soothing pack - 30,000
4. Gum gummy botox - 40.000
5. In Mode Forma - 40.000
6. Chin tip filler - 50.000
7. V-Line Talks - 50.000
8. Full face Botox - 50.000

✅ Happiness worth 99.000 won
1. Full face red injection
2. Airijuran
3. Around the eyes, under the eyes Rizne + Botox
4. Skin Botox 1 part
5. Lip filler + mouth corner botox
6. Water brightening peel + moisture management + collagen pack
7. Excel V (Genesis) + LED + Calming Pack

We are holding a variety of events like this, and our highly skilled medical staff provides direct treatment and provides high-quality results.

If you have any questions please feel free to send a message (100% English) or call 051-918-7757/7755. 010-4401-7757.
You can ask for DR. Kim or DR. Park

Thank you and we appreciate the work you do in Korea!

www.zenclinic.co.kr

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Haeunsa Temple – 해운사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-05-26 23:43
Haeunsa Temple on Mt. Geumosan in Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Haeunsa Temple is located on the northern part of Mt. Geumosan (976.5 m) in western Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that Haeunsa Temple was first founded by the famed monk Doseon-guksa (827-898 A.D.) at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). When the temple was first established, it was named Daehyeolsa Temple. During the late Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), the Korean official-scholar Gil Jae (1353-1419) of the Goryeo Dynasty and early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) hid in this area and planted bamboo. While hiding at the temple, he is said to have learned Taoism, as well.

Sadly, and during the Imjin War (1592-98), all the buildings at the temple were destroyed. In fact, and near Haeunsa Temple, there’s a cave known as Doseon-gul. The cave is named after Doseon-guksa, the founder of the temple. It’s stated that between 500 to 600 people stayed in this cave while fleeing the Japanese invading forces in 1592 during the Imjin War.

It wasn’t until 1925 that the temple was rebuilt, once more, this time by the monk Cheolhwa, who renamed the temple as Haeunsa Temple. The Daeung-jeon Hall at Haeunsa Temple was built in 1956. The rest of the buildings at Haeunsa Temple were rebuilt from 1978-84 by the monk Seonghwa.

Temple Layout

After taking the cable car that brings you halfway up the mountain, you’ll then need to exit the cable car building to the west. Heading in this direction, you’ll come to a small collection of large cairn-like pagodas. It’s to the west of these stone pagodas that you’ll find the compact Cheonwangmun Gate. Housed inside this entry gate are four images of the Four Heavenly Kings. The exterior walls of the Cheonwangmun Gate are adorned with intricate dancheong, as well as images of Geumgang-yeoksa (Vajra Warriors).

Nearing the main temple courtyard, the first building to greet you is the Jijang-jeon Hall. Having entered the main temple courtyard, you’ll find the Jijang-jeon Hall to your right. Alone on the main altar inside this temple shrine hall is large golden image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). To the left and right of the main altar are large paintings dedicated to Jijang-bosal, as well.

To your rear is the compact Jong-ru Pavilion that houses a solitary bronze bell. And to your far left, you’ll find the administrative offices and kitchen facilities at Haeunsa Temple. Straight ahead of you, on the other hand, is a bronze statue of Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag). I’ve seen the exact same statue at both Dorisa Temple and Yongmunsa Temple.

Up a flight of stairs, you’ll come to the Daeung-jeon Hall at Haeunsa Temple. The exterior walls are painted gold and are adorned in cute Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). The reason I say cute is that instead of having a younger ox-herder, the paintings are populated by images of three ox-herding children. Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad of statues under a large, golden canopy. In the centre of this triad rests an image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by statues of Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). To the left of the main altar is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural), while to the right is an equally modern mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

To the right rear of the main hall, and up a longer set of stairs, you’ll find the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall. Looking inside this shaman shrine hall, you’ll find a large statue dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) on the main altar. Backing this statue are two paintings dedicated to two shaman deities. The first of the two, and hanging to the right, is a painting dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), who is accompanied by puggish-looking tiger. And to the left is an equally elaborate painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).

To the left of the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak hall, and down a small mountain trail behind the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find an opening, where there’s a nine-story pagoda with a golden finial atop this stone structure. The base of the structure has nine reliefs of Geumgang-yeoksa (Vajra Warriors). As for each of the nine-stories of the structure, they have diminishing images of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas adorning them as the pagoda moves upwards. Backing this pagoda is a larger statue dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha). This statue is then backed by reliefs of Bodhisattvas like Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Jijang-bosal, as well as images of the Four Heavenly Kings. It’s also from this vantage point that you get beautiful views of Mt. Geumosan off in the distance.

If you have the time and stamina, you can also enjoy Doseon-gul Cave to the southwest of the temple grounds. It’s under 100 metres to get there. And if you really have the time and stamina, you can continue southwest for about 200 metres to see Myeonggeum-pokpo Waterfall.

How To Get There

There are numerous buses that go from the Gumi Intercity Bus Terminal to get to Haeunsa Temple. There are buses like Bus #10, #11, #184, and #195. These buses will drop you off at the “Daegu Eunhaeng-ap hacha – 대구은행앞 하차” bus stop. The bus ride will take just 5 minutes. From here, you’ll then need to cross the road to the south and get on either Bus #27 or Bus #27-3. You’ll then need to get off at the “Geumosan-chulbal hacha – 금오산출발 하차” bus stop. This bus ride should take you an additional 7 minutes. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to head southwest towards Mt. Geumosan. You’ll need to head in this direction for about 500 metres, until you come to the Geumosan Cable Car Building. A return ticket, both there and back, will cost you 11,000 won. If you’d rather just one way, it’ll set you back 6,000 won. Once arriving on the other side, you’ll need to walk just 50 metres southwest to get to Haeunsa Temple.

Overall Rating: 7/10

Of course it’s the views at Haeunsa Temple that are the most impressive. Mt. Geumosan is a beautiful mountain with rugged terrain. In addition to the beautiful environs that envelop Haeunsa Temple, you can also enjoy the beautiful paintings that surround the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall, the pair of shaman murals inside the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall, as well as the nine-story pagoda to the rear of the main hall. Haeunsa Temple presents a beautiful blend of things to see both artistically and naturally.

The cable car building at Mt. Geumosan. Heading up Mt. Geumosan on the cable car. A look towards the Cheonwangmun Gate. A look inside the entry gate at one of the Four Heavenly Kings. And his decorative belt with a yellow image of a Gwimyeon (Monster Mask) on it. Just beyond the Cheonwangmun Gate. A look inside the Jijang-jeon Hall. The statue of Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag) inside the main temple courtyard at Haeunsa Temple. The entry to the Daeung-jeon Hall. A look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall at the main altar. One of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) with the three ox-herding children. A look up at the Sanshin/Dokseong-gak Hall. A look inside the shaman shrine hall at the main altar statue of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) with a painting of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint) to the left and a painting of Sanshin to the right. The trail leading towards the nine-story pagoda. The view along the way of the Daeung-jeon Hall and Mt. Geumosan. The nine-story pagoda with a stone statue of Yaksayeorae-bul (The Medicine Buddha) to the left. A look at the solitary Yaksayeorae-bul with the surrounding forest of Mt. Geumosan.
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Live Rock n Roll: Ilgyne, Sindosi, & Barbie Dolls @ Ovantgarde

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-25 23:51
Date: Sunday, May 26, 2024 - 19:00Location: Event Type: 

Ovantgarde the 6th Anniversary Series Net & Music : Ilgyne X Sindosi X Barbie Dolls 

Doors Open 6pm

Music Starts 7pm

@Ovantgarde (부산 남구 용소로 7번길 15-1)

Tickets: ₩20,000 in advance / ₩30,000 at the door

Ticket link: https://forms.gle/MYGTfEQzEKrM76Xf9

Lineup:

Busan indie rockers Ilgyne @ilgyne_official soundcloud.com/user-394348981

Daegu post-punkers Sindosi  @band_sindosi youtube.com/channel

Busan garage rockers Barbie Dolls @busanbarbiedolls babodools.bandcamp.com

Questions? DM @ovantgarde on Instagram

2024-05-26 Ovantgarde.jpeg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Live Rock n Roll: Ilgyne, Sindosi, & Barbie Dolls @ Ovantgarde

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-25 23:51
Date: Sunday, May 26, 2024 - 19:00Location: Event Type: 

Ovantgarde the 6th Anniversary Series Net & Music : Ilgyne X Sindosi X Barbie Dolls 

Doors Open 6pm

Music Starts 7pm

@Ovantgarde (부산 남구 용소로 7번길 15-1)

Tickets: ₩20,000 in advance / ₩30,000 at the door

Ticket link: https://forms.gle/MYGTfEQzEKrM76Xf9

Lineup:

Busan indie rockers Ilgyne @ilgyne_official soundcloud.com/user-394348981

Daegu post-punkers Sindosi  @band_sindosi youtube.com/channel

Busan garage rockers Barbie Dolls @busanbarbiedolls babodools.bandcamp.com

Questions? DM @ovantgarde on Instagram

2024-05-26 Ovantgarde.jpeg
Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Online ESL English Teacher

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-25 04:14
Location: 

Online English Tutor- Teacher.

Hello.

My name is Eddie and I am from the United Kingdom and I now live in Asia.

I have taught English for 10 years Face to face and Online I have been teaching all over the world from South Korea- to China- to Japan. Philippines and online with Brazil- France- Germany- Poland- Ukraine- Istanbul- Itali- Kazakhstan- England- Holand- America- China- Russia- Belarius-Thailand- Singapore- Malasia- Republic of Korea and many more.

I have taught many subjects of English from: IELTS- TOEFL- Business- Grammar- vocabulary- reading writing, conversation, Business english, exam preparation and more.

I am giving you the opportunity to be learning English with a Qualified Teacher who has been inspired by many cultures off students and in all my years off teaching English all the students have one thing in common and that is low confidence with their English needs I am here to help you to grow and gain the confidence you’re needing as with the subjects you’re wanting to gain and learn.

Foe more information please Send me a message!

 

Regards Edward.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Online ESL English Teacher

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-25 04:14
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

Online English Tutor- Teacher.

Hello.

My name is Eddie and I am from the United Kingdom and I now live in Asia.

I have taught English for 10 years Face to face and Online I have been teaching all over the world from South Korea- to China- to Japan. Philippines and online with Brazil- France- Germany- Poland- Ukraine- Istanbul- Itali- Kazakhstan- England- Holand- America- China- Russia- Belarius-Thailand- Singapore- Malasia- Republic of Korea and many more.

I have taught many subjects of English from: IELTS- TOEFL- Business- Grammar- vocabulary- reading writing, conversation, Business english, exam preparation and more.

I am giving you the opportunity to be learning English with a Qualified Teacher who has been inspired by many cultures off students and in all my years off teaching English all the students have one thing in common and that is low confidence with their English needs I am here to help you to grow and gain the confidence you’re needing as with the subjects you’re wanting to gain and learn.

Foe more information please Send me a message!

 

Regards Edward.

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #8: Cafe – 카페

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-05-23 11:48

We're up to lesson 8 out of 20 in this course! This is a 100% FREE video course for practicing natural Korean conversations, together with full explanations of every new vocabulary word and grammar form. Note that this course also goes in order, so start from the first lesson if you're seeing this for the first time.

This lesson (#8) is about two friends deciding what to order at a cafe.

The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #8: Cafe – 카페 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #8: Cafe – 카페

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-05-23 11:48

We're up to lesson 8 out of 20 in this course! This is a 100% FREE video course for practicing natural Korean conversations, together with full explanations of every new vocabulary word and grammar form. Note that this course also goes in order, so start from the first lesson if you're seeing this for the first time.

This lesson (#8) is about two friends deciding what to order at a cafe.

The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #8: Cafe – 카페 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

FOLLOW ME HERE:       SUBSCRIBE BY EMAIL:

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

Bongamsa Temple – 봉암사 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 23:20
Bongamsa Temple in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Bongamsa Temple is located to the south of Mt. Huiyangsan (996.4 m) in northwestern Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Bongamsa Temple was first founded in 879 A.D. by the monk Jijeung (824-882 A.D.), who was also known as Doheon-guksa. Bongamsa Temple was the main temple of the Huiyangsan School, which was one of the nine branches of Korean Seon Buddhism known as the “Seonjong Gusan – Nine Mountain Seon Sects.” These Seon sects were established at the end of the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392).

It’s believed that the temple was named Bongamsa Temple in 881 A.D. by King Heongang of Silla (875-886 A.D.). This name originally came from a story about how at the time of the temple’s construction, there was a cliff named Gyeam, which means “Rooster’s Cliff” in English. This cliff is located in the Baekundae Valley, which is part of Mt. Huiyangsan. According to this story, a rooster crowed every dawn helping to inform people of the time of day. This rooster was considered to be a phoenix, so the temple was named Bongamsa Temple, which means “Phoenix Cliff/Rock Temple” in English.

Bongamsa Temple in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). The Geukrak-jeon Hall at Bongamsa Temple in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea).

According to an 18th century survey of the names and locations of Buddhist temples in Korea, King Gyeongsun of Silla (927-935 A.D.), who was the last ruler of the Silla Kingdom, took refuge at the temple inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, while escaping the enemy’s advancing army. Shortly thereafter, all of the buildings at Bongamsa Temple were destroyed by fire except for the Geukrak-jeon Hall.

The temple was later rebuilt in 935 A.D. by the monk Jeongjin-guksa. In 1431, the temple underwent a renovation overseen by the monk Gihwa. The temple was partially destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98) and rebuilt, once more, in 1674 by the monk Sinhwa. The current shrine halls at Bongamsa Temple were rebuilt in 1915 after a 1907 fire. In 1955, the temple was restored to its present condition.

In addition to all of this history, Bongamsa Temple also played an important role in the contemporary history of Korean Buddhism, as well. In October, 1947, the monks of this temple formed the Bongamsa Gyeolsa, which means “Phoenix Rock/Cliff Temple Association” in English. And in the following three years, attempts were made to reform Korean Buddhism under the slogan, “Let’s live according to the Buddha’s teachings.” Beginning in the early 1970s, more monks started coming to the temple, and in June, 1982, the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism designated Bongamsa Temple as a special temple. As of 1986, worshippers and visitors can only visit Bongamsa Temple on Buddha’s Birthday.

In total, Bongamsa Temple is home to seven hermitages that include Dongam Hermitage, Hyuhyuam Hermitage, Baekundae Hermitage, Baengnyeonam Hermitage, Hwanjeokdae Hermitage, Wolbongtogul Hermitage, and Yongchuam Hermitage.

In total, Bongamsa Temple is home to one National Treasure and seven additional Korean Treasures. The National Treasure is the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.”

The “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Layout

From the entry of the temple grounds, you’ll make your way up the temple road for about a kilometre next to a meandering stream and Mt. Huiyangsan off in the distance. Eventually you’ll come to a fork in the road. To the left, and on the other side of the stream, you’ll find the temple Iljumun Gate. It’s unknown when this entry gate was first built; however, it’s assumed to have been rebuilt some time in the 18th century. It’s the second oldest structure at the temple after the Geukrak-jeon Hall, which is presumed to have been built in the middle of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). At the base of the structure are wooden panels, leading up to support beams that bookend the central pillar. The exterior is adorned with dancheong colours, and the Iljumun Gate is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material # 591.

Retracing your steps, and now on the north side of the stream, you’ll find a collection of buildings that include the Wonno-seonwon, as well as a wooden pavilion that houses the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jeongjin at Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #172. This stele is dedicated to the monk Jeongjin (878-956 A.D.). It was first erected in 965 A.D. Jeongjin was an active monk at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). He would study in Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) for 25 years before eventually returning to the Korean Peninsula in 924 A.D. Additionally, he was an influential figure on three early Goryeo Dynasty Kings that included King Taejo of Goryeo (r. 918-943 A.D.), King Hyejong of Goryeo (r. 943-945 A.D.), and King Jeongjong of Goryeo (945-949 A.D.). The stele consists of a main body stone, a tortoise-shaped pedestal, and a capstone. Overall, the stele is simple in its overall style.

If you follow the trail to the north of the “Stele of Sanbong-daesa,” you’ll find a collection of additional stele and stupas. The most prominent of these stone artifacts is the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jeongjin at Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #171. Like the neighbouring stele, this stupa was erected in 965 A.D. to commemorate the monk Jeongjin. The stupa is octagonal in shape, and it consists of a base, a main body, and a capstone. The body of the stone structure is adorned with reliefs of flowers, clouds, dragons, and lotus flower designs. The octagonal body stone is adorned with pillar patterns, while the front face of the stone is engraved with a lock design. Only the lotus bud ornament still remains of the original finial. The stupa imitates the style of the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” but with less finesse.

Making your way back down the hillside, and towards the large collection of buildings, you’ll first encounter the administrative office at Bongamsa Temple. It’s to the west of this structure, and between a pair of monks’ dorms, that you’ll find the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall. The Geukrak-jeon Hall resembles a pagoda with its two-story structure. However, it’s a single-story structure that’s meant to resemble a pagoda with its four square sides and veranda on all four sides. The exterior walls are adorned with beautiful dancheong colours and murals of lotus flowers and magpies. Entering the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a solitary image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) on the main altar. Also of interest inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall is a sign that reads “Eopil-gak,” which means that the shrine hall houses a work handwritten by the king. The Geukrak-jeon Hall is one of the oldest temple shrine halls in Korea, which retains features of early temple architecture. But based upon its location and appearance of the current Geukrak-jeon Hall, it was most likely rebuilt sometime in the mid-to-late Joseon Dynasty. But the base and foundation of the structure are much older, possibly even dating back to the Goryeo Dynasty. Additionally, a ridge-roof tile was inscribed with the lettering of “16th Year of Showa” on it, which suggests that the roof was repaired in 1941 during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45).

To the right of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find the Sanshin-gak Hall. The exterior of the shaman shrine hall is rather plainly painted in understated dancheong colours. Stepping inside the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll find a pair of shaman murals. The first to the right is the mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), while the painting to the left is dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Of interest is the teapot design found within the painting dedicated to Dokseong. There are the stormy waves of Samsara overseen by a full moon above the raging waters.

To the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, on the other hand, is the massive Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are painted in unique murals. It appears as though they are describing a sutra, perhaps even the Lotus Sutra as a friend suggested. There are also four red paintings of the Four Heavenly Kings on the backside of the main hall, as well. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll find a large, well-populated main altar. In the centre rests an image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). This triad is backed by a wonderfully, long wooden relief that’s populated by various Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, and Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). To the left of the main altar is a relief of a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). The interior, just like the exterior, is filled with various murals from what appears to be a sutra. And if you look up at the beams of the structure, you’ll find dragons and Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities).

To the left of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll find a wooden pavilion that shelters the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” and the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” Of the two, the stele is the National Treasure. The stele was first erected in 924 A.D. to commemorate the founder of Bongamsa Temple, the monk Jijeung (who was also known as Doheon-guksa). The size and style of the stele are indicative of late Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). The stele is divided into three parts: the tortoise-style base, the body stone, and the cloud-designed capstone. The body stone summarizes the history of Buddhism during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). The writing on the stele was composed by Choe Chiwon (857–10th century), who was one of the greatest scholars of that time.

To the right of the stele is the historic “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” While not a National Treasure, the stupa is a Korean Treasure. The stupa is divided into three parts: the stylobate, the main body, and a finial. Housed inside the main body stone are the sari (crystalized remains) of the founding monk of Bongamsa Temple, the monk Jijeung. The stupa was first erected in 883 A.D. There are images of clouds, Gareungbinga (Kalavinka), the Four Heavenly Kings, Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities), Bodhisattvas, and a locked door. The roof stone of the structure is octagonal in shape, and it has a two-tiers of rafters. The finial is partly broken, but it retains its overall eloquent design despite the damage. Overall, the stupa is well-balanced and stunning with its reliefs.

To the left of the wooden pavilion that holds this National Treasure and Korean Treasure, you’ll find the Josa-jeon Hall. The Josa-jeon Hall’s exterior walls are adorned with beautiful Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). Stepping inside this hall, you’ll find a large collection of paintings and pictures dedicated to prominent monks that once called Bongamsa Temple home.

In front of the Josa-jeon Hall is the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals dedicated to the Nahan, as well as a wintry scene of the temple grounds. Also on either side of the shrine hall’s signboard are two folkish-looking dragons. Stepping inside the shrine hall, you’ll find a large solitary statue of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) on the main altar. On the far left wall is an older Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And to the rear of this painting, and between the main altar and the mural, you’ll find a class enclosure with a finial. The backside of the main altar contains glass-like miniature statues of the Buddha. And in the back right corner is a shaman mural that contains the most prominent Korean shaman deities like Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Chilseong (The Seven Stars), and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). The interior is filled with what looks to be the Sinseon (Taoist Immortals).

In front of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, and in the western temple courtyard, you’ll find the “Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #169. This three-story stone pagoda, which is typical of Silla design, is believed to have been first erected during the 9th century. What’s most remarkable about this rather traditionally design pagoda is that its finial is fully intact. This is exceedingly rare in a pagoda of this age.

About two to three hundred metres up a wooded trail to the west, you’ll find Baekundae Valley, which is where the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” is located. The large relief is some nearly 5.4 metres in height and 5.02 metres wide. It was first created by the monk Uicheon in 1663. The image of Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) has a round, slender face with a sharp nose, meditative eyes, and a gentle closed mouth. Together, the image emits an overall sense of tranquility. Atop the image’s head, he wears a crown with floral designs in the centre. The body of Mireuk-bul is clothed in a robe that’s draped over both of its shoulders. Mireuk-bul sits with his legs crossed. In his right hand, he holds a lotus stem, which he supports with his left hand. And between Mireuk-bul’s eyes, you’ll find a jewel that’s meant to represent his mercy shining out onto the world. It’s presumed that this jewel was added in the mid-20th century and there was just a hollow before that. As for the location of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple,” it’s located in the idyllic Baekundae Valley. It’s an oasis-like location with clusters of giant boulders, cascading rapids, and pools of emerald coloured mountain water. The entire area has a tranquil feeling to it. And if you have a moment to yourself while there, you should definitely enjoy the areas serene sounds and sublime beauty.

How To Get There

By public transportation, it’ll take about an hour and thirty minutes to get to Bongamsa Temple. From the Mungyeong Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #20-1. You’ll need to take this bus for 10 stops, or 21 minutes, until you get to the “Ma-seong – 마성 하차” bus stop. From there, you’ll need to cross the street and catch Bus #32. You’ll then need to take this bus for 26 stops, or 55 minutes, and get off at the “Bongamsa Ipgu, Wonbuk 2ri – 봉암사입구, 원북2 하차” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk north for 640 metres, or 10 minutes, until you get to the front entry gate at Bongamsa Temple.

If you don’t want to spend an hour and a half on two buses with a hike at the end, then you can simply take a taxi from the Mungyeong Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride should take about 28 minutes, over 23 km, and it’ll cost you around 30,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 9/10

Because Bongamsa Temple is open just one day a year to the general public, its off-limits status helps elevate its overall rating. Additionally, the stunning National Treasure, the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple,” is one of the finest examples of a historic stele in Korea, which is joined under the same wooden pavilion by the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” In fact, all of the Korean Treasures are stunning as is the location of the temple under the granite peak of Mt. Huiyangsan. The location is tranquil, and highlighted by Baekundae Valley in the western outskirts of the temple grounds. This oasis-like location complemented by the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple,” which is yet another of the seven Korean Treasures at Bongamsa Temple. Additionally, the massive Daeungbo-jeon Hall, the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall, and the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall all deserve your attention, as well. Bongamsa Temple is a wonderful example of how Korean Buddhism blends seamlessly the architecture and artistry with its beautiful surroundings. While busy on Buddha’s Birthday, which is the only day the temple is open to the general public, it’s well-worth the time and effort to see the temple on its annual opening.

The trail leading up to Bongamsa Temple with Mt. Huiyangsan in the background. The streamside Iljumun Gate. The historic Geukrak-jeon Hall. A look inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall at Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). A mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the Sanshin-gak Hall. Joined by this image of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). The large Daeungbo-jeon Hall at Bongamsa Temple. One of the unique exterior wall murals that adorns the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. A look inside the main hall. The main altar inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The wooden pavilion that houses the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” (right) and the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” (left). A closer look at the National Treasure at Bongamsa Temple: the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” Joined by the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” A closer look at the historic stupa. The Josa-jeon Hall with Mt. Huiyangsan framing the temple grounds. The Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall and the “Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Bongamsa Temple.” A look inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall at the main altar image of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). Baekundae Valley with the image of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” in its midst. The “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” from a different angle. An up-close of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple.” Beautiful Baekundae Valley!—

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Bongamsa Temple – 봉암사 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 23:20
Bongamsa Temple in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Bongamsa Temple is located to the south of Mt. Huiyangsan (996.4 m) in northwestern Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Bongamsa Temple was first founded in 879 A.D. by the monk Jijeung (824-882 A.D.), who was also known as Doheon-guksa. Bongamsa Temple was the main temple of the Huiyangsan School, which was one of the nine branches of Korean Seon Buddhism known as the “Seonjong Gusan – Nine Mountain Seon Sects.” These Seon sects were established at the end of the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392).

It’s believed that the temple was named Bongamsa Temple in 881 A.D. by King Heongang of Silla (875-886 A.D.). This name originally came from a story about how at the time of the temple’s construction, there was a cliff named Gyeam, which means “Rooster’s Cliff” in English. This cliff is located in the Baekundae Valley, which is part of Mt. Huiyangsan. According to this story, a rooster crowed every dawn helping to inform people of the time of day. This rooster was considered to be a phoenix, so the temple was named Bongamsa Temple, which means “Phoenix Cliff/Rock Temple” in English.

Bongamsa Temple in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). The Geukrak-jeon Hall at Bongamsa Temple in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea).

According to an 18th century survey of the names and locations of Buddhist temples in Korea, King Gyeongsun of Silla (927-935 A.D.), who was the last ruler of the Silla Kingdom, took refuge at the temple inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, while escaping the enemy’s advancing army. Shortly thereafter, all of the buildings at Bongamsa Temple were destroyed by fire except for the Geukrak-jeon Hall.

The temple was later rebuilt in 935 A.D. by the monk Jeongjin-guksa. In 1431, the temple underwent a renovation overseen by the monk Gihwa. The temple was partially destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98) and rebuilt, once more, in 1674 by the monk Sinhwa. The current shrine halls at Bongamsa Temple were rebuilt in 1915 after a 1907 fire. In 1955, the temple was restored to its present condition.

In addition to all of this history, Bongamsa Temple also played an important role in the contemporary history of Korean Buddhism, as well. In October, 1947, the monks of this temple formed the Bongamsa Gyeolsa, which means “Phoenix Rock/Cliff Temple Association” in English. And in the following three years, attempts were made to reform Korean Buddhism under the slogan, “Let’s live according to the Buddha’s teachings.” Beginning in the early 1970s, more monks started coming to the temple, and in June, 1982, the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism designated Bongamsa Temple as a special temple. As of 1986, worshippers and visitors can only visit Bongamsa Temple on Buddha’s Birthday.

In total, Bongamsa Temple is home to seven hermitages that include Dongam Hermitage, Hyuhyuam Hermitage, Baekundae Hermitage, Baengnyeonam Hermitage, Hwanjeokdae Hermitage, Wolbongtogul Hermitage, and Yongchuam Hermitage.

In total, Bongamsa Temple is home to one National Treasure and seven additional Korean Treasures. The National Treasure is the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.”

The “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” in 1919. (Picture courtesy of the National Museum of Korea). Temple Layout

From the entry of the temple grounds, you’ll make your way up the temple road for about a kilometre next to a meandering stream and Mt. Huiyangsan off in the distance. Eventually you’ll come to a fork in the road. To the left, and on the other side of the stream, you’ll find the temple Iljumun Gate. It’s unknown when this entry gate was first built; however, it’s assumed to have been rebuilt some time in the 18th century. It’s the second oldest structure at the temple after the Geukrak-jeon Hall, which is presumed to have been built in the middle of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). At the base of the structure are wooden panels, leading up to support beams that bookend the central pillar. The exterior is adorned with dancheong colours, and the Iljumun Gate is Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Heritage Material # 591.

Retracing your steps, and now on the north side of the stream, you’ll find a collection of buildings that include the Wonno-seonwon, as well as a wooden pavilion that houses the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jeongjin at Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #172. This stele is dedicated to the monk Jeongjin (878-956 A.D.). It was first erected in 965 A.D. Jeongjin was an active monk at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). He would study in Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) for 25 years before eventually returning to the Korean Peninsula in 924 A.D. Additionally, he was an influential figure on three early Goryeo Dynasty Kings that included King Taejo of Goryeo (r. 918-943 A.D.), King Hyejong of Goryeo (r. 943-945 A.D.), and King Jeongjong of Goryeo (945-949 A.D.). The stele consists of a main body stone, a tortoise-shaped pedestal, and a capstone. Overall, the stele is simple in its overall style.

If you follow the trail to the north of the “Stele of Sanbong-daesa,” you’ll find a collection of additional stele and stupas. The most prominent of these stone artifacts is the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jeongjin at Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #171. Like the neighbouring stele, this stupa was erected in 965 A.D. to commemorate the monk Jeongjin. The stupa is octagonal in shape, and it consists of a base, a main body, and a capstone. The body of the stone structure is adorned with reliefs of flowers, clouds, dragons, and lotus flower designs. The octagonal body stone is adorned with pillar patterns, while the front face of the stone is engraved with a lock design. Only the lotus bud ornament still remains of the original finial. The stupa imitates the style of the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” but with less finesse.

Making your way back down the hillside, and towards the large collection of buildings, you’ll first encounter the administrative office at Bongamsa Temple. It’s to the west of this structure, and between a pair of monks’ dorms, that you’ll find the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall. The Geukrak-jeon Hall resembles a pagoda with its two-story structure. However, it’s a single-story structure that’s meant to resemble a pagoda with its four square sides and veranda on all four sides. The exterior walls are adorned with beautiful dancheong colours and murals of lotus flowers and magpies. Entering the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a solitary image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) on the main altar. Also of interest inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall is a sign that reads “Eopil-gak,” which means that the shrine hall houses a work handwritten by the king. The Geukrak-jeon Hall is one of the oldest temple shrine halls in Korea, which retains features of early temple architecture. But based upon its location and appearance of the current Geukrak-jeon Hall, it was most likely rebuilt sometime in the mid-to-late Joseon Dynasty. But the base and foundation of the structure are much older, possibly even dating back to the Goryeo Dynasty. Additionally, a ridge-roof tile was inscribed with the lettering of “16th Year of Showa” on it, which suggests that the roof was repaired in 1941 during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45).

To the right of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find the Sanshin-gak Hall. The exterior of the shaman shrine hall is rather plainly painted in understated dancheong colours. Stepping inside the Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll find a pair of shaman murals. The first to the right is the mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), while the painting to the left is dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). Of interest is the teapot design found within the painting dedicated to Dokseong. There are the stormy waves of Samsara overseen by a full moon above the raging waters.

To the left of the Geukrak-jeon Hall, on the other hand, is the massive Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are painted in unique murals. It appears as though they are describing a sutra, perhaps even the Lotus Sutra as a friend suggested. There are also four red paintings of the Four Heavenly Kings on the backside of the main hall, as well. Stepping inside the main hall, you’ll find a large, well-populated main altar. In the centre rests an image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), who is joined on either side by Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power) and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). This triad is backed by a wonderfully, long wooden relief that’s populated by various Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, and Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha). To the left of the main altar is a relief of a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). The interior, just like the exterior, is filled with various murals from what appears to be a sutra. And if you look up at the beams of the structure, you’ll find dragons and Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities).

To the left of the Daeungbo-jeon Hall, you’ll find a wooden pavilion that shelters the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” and the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” Of the two, the stele is the National Treasure. The stele was first erected in 924 A.D. to commemorate the founder of Bongamsa Temple, the monk Jijeung (who was also known as Doheon-guksa). The size and style of the stele are indicative of late Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). The stele is divided into three parts: the tortoise-style base, the body stone, and the cloud-designed capstone. The body stone summarizes the history of Buddhism during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). The writing on the stele was composed by Choe Chiwon (857–10th century), who was one of the greatest scholars of that time.

To the right of the stele is the historic “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” While not a National Treasure, the stupa is a Korean Treasure. The stupa is divided into three parts: the stylobate, the main body, and a finial. Housed inside the main body stone are the sari (crystalized remains) of the founding monk of Bongamsa Temple, the monk Jijeung. The stupa was first erected in 883 A.D. There are images of clouds, Gareungbinga (Kalavinka), the Four Heavenly Kings, Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities), Bodhisattvas, and a locked door. The roof stone of the structure is octagonal in shape, and it has a two-tiers of rafters. The finial is partly broken, but it retains its overall eloquent design despite the damage. Overall, the stupa is well-balanced and stunning with its reliefs.

To the left of the wooden pavilion that holds this National Treasure and Korean Treasure, you’ll find the Josa-jeon Hall. The Josa-jeon Hall’s exterior walls are adorned with beautiful Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). Stepping inside this hall, you’ll find a large collection of paintings and pictures dedicated to prominent monks that once called Bongamsa Temple home.

In front of the Josa-jeon Hall is the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned with murals dedicated to the Nahan, as well as a wintry scene of the temple grounds. Also on either side of the shrine hall’s signboard are two folkish-looking dragons. Stepping inside the shrine hall, you’ll find a large solitary statue of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) on the main altar. On the far left wall is an older Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). And to the rear of this painting, and between the main altar and the mural, you’ll find a class enclosure with a finial. The backside of the main altar contains glass-like miniature statues of the Buddha. And in the back right corner is a shaman mural that contains the most prominent Korean shaman deities like Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), Chilseong (The Seven Stars), and Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). The interior is filled with what looks to be the Sinseon (Taoist Immortals).

In front of the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall, and in the western temple courtyard, you’ll find the “Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Bongamsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #169. This three-story stone pagoda, which is typical of Silla design, is believed to have been first erected during the 9th century. What’s most remarkable about this rather traditionally design pagoda is that its finial is fully intact. This is exceedingly rare in a pagoda of this age.

About two to three hundred metres up a wooded trail to the west, you’ll find Baekundae Valley, which is where the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” is located. The large relief is some nearly 5.4 metres in height and 5.02 metres wide. It was first created by the monk Uicheon in 1663. The image of Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) has a round, slender face with a sharp nose, meditative eyes, and a gentle closed mouth. Together, the image emits an overall sense of tranquility. Atop the image’s head, he wears a crown with floral designs in the centre. The body of Mireuk-bul is clothed in a robe that’s draped over both of its shoulders. Mireuk-bul sits with his legs crossed. In his right hand, he holds a lotus stem, which he supports with his left hand. And between Mireuk-bul’s eyes, you’ll find a jewel that’s meant to represent his mercy shining out onto the world. It’s presumed that this jewel was added in the mid-20th century and there was just a hollow before that. As for the location of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple,” it’s located in the idyllic Baekundae Valley. It’s an oasis-like location with clusters of giant boulders, cascading rapids, and pools of emerald coloured mountain water. The entire area has a tranquil feeling to it. And if you have a moment to yourself while there, you should definitely enjoy the areas serene sounds and sublime beauty.

How To Get There

By public transportation, it’ll take about an hour and thirty minutes to get to Bongamsa Temple. From the Mungyeong Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #20-1. You’ll need to take this bus for 10 stops, or 21 minutes, until you get to the “Ma-seong – 마성 하차” bus stop. From there, you’ll need to cross the street and catch Bus #32. You’ll then need to take this bus for 26 stops, or 55 minutes, and get off at the “Bongamsa Ipgu, Wonbuk 2ri – 봉암사입구, 원북2 하차” bus stop. From where the bus drops you off, you’ll need to walk north for 640 metres, or 10 minutes, until you get to the front entry gate at Bongamsa Temple.

If you don’t want to spend an hour and a half on two buses with a hike at the end, then you can simply take a taxi from the Mungyeong Intercity Bus Terminal. The taxi ride should take about 28 minutes, over 23 km, and it’ll cost you around 30,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 9/10

Because Bongamsa Temple is open just one day a year to the general public, its off-limits status helps elevate its overall rating. Additionally, the stunning National Treasure, the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple,” is one of the finest examples of a historic stele in Korea, which is joined under the same wooden pavilion by the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” In fact, all of the Korean Treasures are stunning as is the location of the temple under the granite peak of Mt. Huiyangsan. The location is tranquil, and highlighted by Baekundae Valley in the western outskirts of the temple grounds. This oasis-like location complemented by the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple,” which is yet another of the seven Korean Treasures at Bongamsa Temple. Additionally, the massive Daeungbo-jeon Hall, the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall, and the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall all deserve your attention, as well. Bongamsa Temple is a wonderful example of how Korean Buddhism blends seamlessly the architecture and artistry with its beautiful surroundings. While busy on Buddha’s Birthday, which is the only day the temple is open to the general public, it’s well-worth the time and effort to see the temple on its annual opening.

The trail leading up to Bongamsa Temple with Mt. Huiyangsan in the background. The streamside Iljumun Gate. The historic Geukrak-jeon Hall. A look inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall at Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). A mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) inside the Sanshin-gak Hall. Joined by this image of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). The large Daeungbo-jeon Hall at Bongamsa Temple. One of the unique exterior wall murals that adorns the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. A look inside the main hall. The main altar inside the Daeungbo-jeon Hall. The wooden pavilion that houses the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” (right) and the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple” (left). A closer look at the National Treasure at Bongamsa Temple: the “Stele of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” Joined by the “Stupa of Buddhist Monk Jijeung at Bongamsa Temple.” A closer look at the historic stupa. The Josa-jeon Hall with Mt. Huiyangsan framing the temple grounds. The Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall and the “Three-Story Stone Pagoda of Bongamsa Temple.” A look inside the Daejeokgwang-jeon Hall at the main altar image of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy). Baekundae Valley with the image of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” in its midst. The “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple” from a different angle. An up-close of the “Rock-carved Seated Maitreya Bodhisattva of Bongamsa Temple.” Beautiful Baekundae Valley!—

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Beneath the Lanterns: A Photographer’s Journey Through Buddha’s Birthday at Tongdosa Temple

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 22:56

Stepping into the annual Buddha’s Birthday celebration at Tongdosa Temple is like slipping into a parallel world where time slows, and every moment holds a story. On May 15th, I found myself once again among the mountains of Yangsan, visiting this sacred site that has been my haven for over two decades. There’s a timeless magic to Tongdosa, a place that continuously captivates me with its serene ambiance and historical depth, especially during this vibrant festival.

A Contrast in Celebrations

In contrast to the bustling spectacle at Busan’s Samgwangsa, Tongdosa offers a quieter, more introspective celebration. The whispers of history echo through the temple’s ancient architecture, and as a photographer, the challenge isn’t finding something to shoot—it’s deciding where to begin. With so many intricate details and fleeting moments, the task can be overwhelming. My approach is methodical: I scout the grounds before the blue hour, mentally sketching my shots and preparing for the evening’s visual feast.

The Rituals of Preparation

As dusk approached, I moved with purpose from the front gate to the heart of the temple, orienting myself and soaking in the atmosphere. The rhythmic cadence of the bell ringing and the drumming ceremony set the tone, grounding me in the present and readying my senses for the night ahead.

The Dragon Lantern and the Blue Hour

The dragon lantern, majestically coiled around the pond behind the main hall, stood as this year’s centerpiece. It was a challenging shot, with the crowd pressing in and the light playing tricks, but I thrive on such challenges. Adjusting my position, I retreated to the courtyard, ensuring I had the perfect vantage point for capturing the blue hour’s ethereal glow.

An Unexpected Encounter

Amidst the flurry of activity, I encountered one of my photography students. His surprise at my swift, purposeful movements was palpable. This wasn’t a leisurely class; it was a high-stakes mission to capture the essence of the celebration. Guiding him through the chaos, I hoped to impart a glimpse of the disciplined spontaneity that defines my work.

A Parting in the Rain

As we neared the temple’s entrance, I offered him a ride home. He chose to stay, drawn by the temple’s pull, despite the encroaching rain. Parting ways, I stocked up on snacks and caffeine for the drive, my thoughts lingering on the night’s shoot and the profound connection I feel with Tongdosa.

Memories and Mentors

This temple isn’t just a location; it’s a repository of memories. I remember bringing my parents here after my wedding, sharing the serenity of Tongdosa with them. It’s a place I visited often with my late friend and mentor, Dave Harvey. His spirit feels omnipresent, a guiding force reminding me to check my composition and avoid overexposure, subtly shaping my every shot.

The annual Buddha’s Birthday celebration at Tongdosa is more than a photographic opportunity. It’s a pilgrimage of the heart, a return to a place where past and present coalesce, and every captured image tells a story of reverence, history, and personal connection.

The post Beneath the Lanterns: A Photographer’s Journey Through Buddha’s Birthday at Tongdosa Temple appeared first on The Sajin.

Jason Teale 

Photographer, educator, podcaster

Podcast    Website    Instagram

Photographing Korea and the world beyond!

 

 

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Beneath the Lanterns: A Photographer’s Journey Through Buddha’s Birthday at Tongdosa Temple

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 22:56

Stepping into the annual Buddha’s Birthday celebration at Tongdosa Temple is like slipping into a parallel world where time slows, and every moment holds a story. On May 15th, I found myself once again among the mountains of Yangsan, visiting this sacred site that has been my haven for over two decades. There’s a timeless magic to Tongdosa, a place that continuously captivates me with its serene ambiance and historical depth, especially during this vibrant festival.

A Contrast in Celebrations

In contrast to the bustling spectacle at Busan’s Samgwangsa, Tongdosa offers a quieter, more introspective celebration. The whispers of history echo through the temple’s ancient architecture, and as a photographer, the challenge isn’t finding something to shoot—it’s deciding where to begin. With so many intricate details and fleeting moments, the task can be overwhelming. My approach is methodical: I scout the grounds before the blue hour, mentally sketching my shots and preparing for the evening’s visual feast.

The Rituals of Preparation

As dusk approached, I moved with purpose from the front gate to the heart of the temple, orienting myself and soaking in the atmosphere. The rhythmic cadence of the bell ringing and the drumming ceremony set the tone, grounding me in the present and readying my senses for the night ahead.

The Dragon Lantern and the Blue Hour

The dragon lantern, majestically coiled around the pond behind the main hall, stood as this year’s centerpiece. It was a challenging shot, with the crowd pressing in and the light playing tricks, but I thrive on such challenges. Adjusting my position, I retreated to the courtyard, ensuring I had the perfect vantage point for capturing the blue hour’s ethereal glow.

An Unexpected Encounter

Amidst the flurry of activity, I encountered one of my photography students. His surprise at my swift, purposeful movements was palpable. This wasn’t a leisurely class; it was a high-stakes mission to capture the essence of the celebration. Guiding him through the chaos, I hoped to impart a glimpse of the disciplined spontaneity that defines my work.

A Parting in the Rain

As we neared the temple’s entrance, I offered him a ride home. He chose to stay, drawn by the temple’s pull, despite the encroaching rain. Parting ways, I stocked up on snacks and caffeine for the drive, my thoughts lingering on the night’s shoot and the profound connection I feel with Tongdosa.

Memories and Mentors

This temple isn’t just a location; it’s a repository of memories. I remember bringing my parents here after my wedding, sharing the serenity of Tongdosa with them. It’s a place I visited often with my late friend and mentor, Dave Harvey. His spirit feels omnipresent, a guiding force reminding me to check my composition and avoid overexposure, subtly shaping my every shot.

The annual Buddha’s Birthday celebration at Tongdosa is more than a photographic opportunity. It’s a pilgrimage of the heart, a return to a place where past and present coalesce, and every captured image tells a story of reverence, history, and personal connection.

The post Beneath the Lanterns: A Photographer’s Journey Through Buddha’s Birthday at Tongdosa Temple appeared first on The Sajin.

Jason Teale 

Photographer, educator, podcaster

Podcast    Website    Instagram

Photographing Korea and the world beyond!

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 09:46
Are you curious about how to study Korean effectively? The short answer: Start by learning Hangeul (the Korean alphabet), basic vocabulary, and … How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics CONTINUE READING The post How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics appeared first on 90 Day Korean.—

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 

Please share, help Korean spread! 

 

 

Categories: Worldbridges Megafeed

How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-22 09:46
Are you curious about how to study Korean effectively? The short answer: Start by learning Hangeul (the Korean alphabet), basic vocabulary, and … How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics CONTINUE READING The post How to Study Korean – 9 Effective Learning Tactics appeared first on 90 Day Korean.—

Learn to read Korean and be having simple conversations, taking taxis and ordering in Korean within a week with our FREE Hangeul Hacks series: http://www.90DayKorean.com/learn

Korean lessons   *  Korean Phrases    *    Korean Vocabulary *   Learn Korean   *    Learn Korean alphabet   *   Learn Korean fast   *  Motivation    *   Study Korean  

 

Please share, help Korean spread! 

 

 

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“Boring!” 지루하다 VS 심심하다 | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-20 22:31

지루하다 and 심심하다 have simple differences, and also more complex differences. On the surface, 지루하다 is typically used to say that something is "boring," while 심심하다 is used to say that you feel "bored." So use 지루하다 as "to be boring" and 심심하다 as "to be bored." That's it... but there's a bit more to it when you look at their actual usages. Sometimes you might hear one or the other used when it seems the translation doesn't fit. Or you may have heard other verbs that also seem to have the same translations. I'll show which ones you should know how to use and when to use them in this week's newest Korean FAQ episode.

The post “Boring!” 지루하다 VS 심심하다 | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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InterLEX Consulting & Law

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-20 08:03
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: https://www.interlex.co.kr/

InterLEX provides corporate and personal litigation services in a wide variety of practice areas. We are a leading Korean law firm in labor law, covering SMEs and large corporates with an emphasis on professional care and understanding. InterLEX Labour Law Firms in Korea works with Korean and international clients regularly, handling a broad range of local and cross-border issues, and providing clear and practical advice.

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