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Dongnae language exchange

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-20 04:48
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Dongnae

I am learning Korean and would like to do a language exchange (Korean-English).

Place: Dongnae Station. 

Time: Monday morning 9-10am

I can offer free talking in English.

I want to increase my Korean listening and speaking skills which are at the beginner level.

If interested send me a message as soon as possible.

thanks

Joe NZ (saram ib ni da). 

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Jeokcheonsa Temple – 적천사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-05-19 23:27
Jeokcheonsa Temple in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Jeokcheonsa Temple is located to the north of Mt. Osan (514.6 m) in southern Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Jeokcheonsa Temple was originally a cave temple first founded by Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) in 664 A.D. The temple was later rebuilt in 828 A.D. by the monk Simji, who was the third son of King Heungdeok of Silla (826-836 A.D.). In 1175, the monk Jinul (1158-1210) rebuilt Jeokcheonsa Temple. Additionally, at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), some five hermitages would be built on the Jeokcheonsa Temple grounds, as well. During the Imjin War (1592-98), the temple would be destroyed by the invading Japanese in 1594. The temple would be rebuilt, yet again, in 1664 and repaired in 1694 led by the monk Taeheo.

At the end of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple was used by the Righteous Army. As a result, some of the buildings and the Yosache (monks’ dorms) were destroyed by fire. In 1946, Jeokcheonsa Temple was used to help celebrate the liberation of the Korean Peninsula. The monks at Jeokcheonsa Temple also prayed for the ability of the nation to overcome the difficulties ahead in unifying the country, once again. In 1981, and while repairing the Cheonwangmun Gate, relics such as sari (crystalized remains), sutras, and 23 pieces of cloth, were discovered inside the wooden statues. Additionally, the date of the creation of the Four Heavenly Kings was discovered, as well. These stunning wooden statues were discovered to date back to 1690. And in 1991, the Myeongbu-jeon Hall was built on the temple grounds.

In total, Jeokcheonsa Temple is home to one Korean Treasure. It’s the “Hanging Painting and Flagpole Supports of Jeokcheonsa Temple,” which is Korean Treasure #1432. The temple is also home to a Natural Monument, which is the 800 year old “Ginkgo Tree of Jeokcheonsa Temple.” Lastly, the temple is home to two Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Properties. They are the aforementioned “Wooden Four Heavenly Kings Seated on Stools,” which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property #153; as well as the Daeung-jeon Hall, which is Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property #321.

Temple Layout

You first approach the very rural Jeokcheonsa Temple up a long, winding road. In fact, you follow this road for so long that you might think that there isn’t an end to this rural road. When you finally do come to the end of the road, you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot at Jeokcheonsa Temple.

To the left of the gravel parking lot, you’ll find the natural wood exterior of the Cheonwangmun Gate. As you enter the entry gate, you’ll notice four images of the Four Heavenly Kings. They are made from three pieces of wood, and they range in size from 3.4 to 3.8 metres in height. Though they are quite large, they are also well-balanced. They all have stunning red crowns, and they all wear armour. According to written material found on the statues, they are believed to date back to 1690. Rather surprisingly, they are only a Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property #153 and not a Korean Treasure. And if you look towards the feet of these statues, you’ll notice that they are trampling some pretty scary images of demons underfoot.

Now having passed through the Cheonwangmun Gate, you’ll be greeted on the other side by the rather large Boje-ru Pavilion. The first floor of this structure acts as an entryway into the main temple grounds, while the second story is used for larger dharma talks. You’ll need to slouch down a bit so that you don’t bump your head, while passing through this pavilion.

Climbing the set of stairs that leads up to the temple’s main courtyard, you’ll be greeted by a collection of shrine halls and buildings. To your immediate left is the temple’s understated Jong-ru Pavilion. Housed inside this open-concept bell pavilion are the four traditional Buddhist percussion instruments. They include a beautifully polished bronze bell that’s joined by an equally exquisite blue mokeo (wooden fish drum) and an unpan (cloud plate drum), as well as a freshly painted beopgo (dharma drum). Neighbouring the Jong-ru Pavilion is a rather long Myeongbu-jeon Hall. The exterior walls are adorned in understated dancheong colours. Stepping inside the Myeongbu-jeon Hall, you’ll find a statue of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife) on the main altar joined by statues of the Siwang (The Ten Kings of the Underworld). And to your immediate right, on the other hand, are a row of structures that include the Yosache (monks’ dorms), the temple’s kitchen, and the administrative office.

Slightly to the right, and straight ahead, is the Daeung-jeon Hall at Jeokcheonsa Temple. The exterior walls of the main hall are adorned with some images of a white Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion), the Bodhidharma, as well as a collection of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a triad of statues centred by Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). And flanking this image on either side are statues dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Buddha of Medicine, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise), as well as Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise). It should be noted, however, that this main hall has been locked on me before, so it might not be open when you visit. This Daeung-jeon Hall was built in the late Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), and it’s Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property #321.

To the left and right rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall are two smaller sized shrine halls. The shrine hall to the left rear is the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to the Yeongsan-jeon Hall are adorned in some beautiful landscape paintings. Housed inside this shrine hall are sixteen all-white stone images of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha), who are joined by a triad of white statues on the main altar, as well. Seated in the centre of this triad is Seokgamoni-bul, who is joined by golden, crowned images of Yeondeung-bul (The Past Buddha) and Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha).

And to the right rear of the Daeung-jeon Hall, and joined by some more monks’ dorms, is the Samseong-gak Hall. The exterior walls to this shaman shrine hall are adorned in floral and landscape paintings. Stepping inside the Samseong-gak Hall, you’ll find a set of paintings dedicated to the three most popular shaman deities in Korea. As you first enter, you’ll be greeted by a rather strange older image of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). This rather peculiar image is fronted by a statue of the shaman deity. Just to the right of Sanshin hangs an equally older painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And rather atypically, the oldest-looking painting of the set of three, Chilseong (The Seven Stars), hangs on the far right wall. I say atypically because the mural of Chilseong, who represents the heavens, usually hangs in the centre of the set of three.

How To Get There

Unfortunately, there’s no public transportation that goes directly to Jeokcheonsa Temple from the city of Cheongdo; instead, you’ll need to take a taxi from the Cheongdo Intercity Bus Terminal to get out to the temple. The ride should take you about 15 minutes, and it’ll set you back about 10,000 won (one way).

Overall Rating: 6/10

For such a virtually unknown temple, Jeokcheonsa Temple has a lot for visitors to see starting with the Cheonwangmun Gate and the historic Four Heavenly King statues housed inside it. Additionally, you can enjoy the exterior wall paintings of the Daeung-jeon Hall, as well as the all-white statues inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall and the atypical paintings inside the Samseong-gak Hall. There seems to be a little bit of something for everyone at Jeokcheonsa Temple; the only difficulty seems to be getting there.

The Cheonwangmun Gate. One of the Four Heavenly Kings inside the Cheonwangmun Gate. One of the demons being trampled underfoot inside the Cheonwangmun Gate. The Boje-ru Pavilion. The Jong-ru Pavilion. The Daeung-jeon Hall at Jeokcheonsa Temple. A painting of the Bodhidharma that adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. Joined by a collection of Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals). The Myeongbu-jeon Hall. A look inside the Yeongsan-jeon Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall. An older painting dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) inside the shaman shrine hall. Joined by these images of Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And this of Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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Masters degree F6 visa available now!

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-05-19 04:17
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

ESL teacher with over 15 years of experience at all levels seeking full time or part time work. Masters degree in education. F6 visa. Contact [email protected] and I will send you resume. Available immediately.

 

모든 레벨에서 15년 이상의 경험을 보유한 ESL 교사입니다.  풀타임 또는 파트타임 근무를 찾고 있습니다.  [email protected] 으로 연락주시면 이력서를 보내드리겠습니다. 즉시 이용 가능합니다.

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Discover Opportunities with ESL VivaCom Recruiting

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-18 10:08
Location: Business/Organization Type: 

ESL Job Station is an integral part of Esl VivaCom Recruiting, providing a centralized platform where teachers can find a plethora of job listings tailored to their qualifications and preferences. This platform offers several key features.

Contact Us

Esl VivaCom Recruiting

3-512, Bugokjoongangnam6gil 53, Uiwang City, Gyeonggido(437-040) Korea

010.7189.2071

010.2215.2071

[email protected]

http://www.eslviva.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ESLViva

https://twitter.com/eslviva

https://www.instagram.com/eslvivacom/

esl classes1.jpg
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F6 Visa, Master's Degree, Teacher Available in Busan, September 1

Koreabridge - Sat, 2024-05-18 00:35
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Sajik Dong

Experienced and certified teacher with a Master's Degree from The University of Chicago and an F6 Visa, available to teach in Busan, starting September 1, 2024. I can teach English, history, political science, social science, social studies, humanities, writing, and more. Interested in teaching adults, college students, high school students, or middle school students, but I am able to teach elementary school students as well. I am seeking a full-time position, preferably near Sajik Dong in Busan. 

Please see the link to my online resume/CV/portfolio below:

https://www.andycrown.net/resume.pdf

Thank you for your time and interest. 

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Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #7: Bike Riding Meeting – 라이딩 모임

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-05-16 11:59

We're up to lesson 7, out of a total of 20. This is a FREE video course for learning real, natural Korean conversation. Each week I'm uploading one new episode. This series focuses on what real conversations are like, covering all of the included grammar, expressions, and vocabulary that appears. I move through the conversations one line at a time, so that anyone with a foundation in the language can follow along.

Today's newest episode is about attending a bike riding meeting (which are fairly common, along with other gatherings), and meeting another member.

The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #7: Bike Riding Meeting – 라이딩 모임 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Hagwon for Sale

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-05-16 03:21
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: 

Thriving ESL school for sale in Jinju. Our school is directly across the street from an elementary school. Perfect for someone who loves teaching and wants to take things to the next level. Fifty million won plus building deposit .  Investment will be made back in 3-5 months. Serious inquiries please email  [email protected]

Joshua Lorenzo Newett

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Daesansa Temple – 대산사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-15 23:27
A Look Inside the Yongwang-dang Hall at Daesansa Temple in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Daesansa Temple is located to the northeast of Mt. Cheonwangsan (619.3 m) in western Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. According to the “Woleunsan Daesansa Sajeok – 월은산 대산사 사적,” which is the only historical record about Daesansa Temple, the temple was first established in 830 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). But as you can tell from the time that Wonhyo-daesa actually lived, this makes the construction of the temple by Wonhyo-daesa a little suspicious.

With this in mind, when the temple was first established, it was named Yongbongsa Temple. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), Ilyeon (1206-1289) was the head monk of Yongbongsa Temple. It was at this time that the history of Daesansa Temple was written.

During the Imjin War (1592-98), the temple was destroyed by Japanese forces in 1592. The temple would later be rebuilt through the support of the royal family. However, in 1866, the temple was destroyed, once more, when it was looted and set on fire by thieves. In 1876, the temple was rebuilt and renamed as Daesansa Temple. However, the temple would be destroyed by fire, again, in 1930. So in 1959, the temple was rebuilt for the final time and continues to grow in size up to the present day.

In addition to the history of the temple, there’s a legend that claims that during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.), a Sugwanseeum-bosal (A Three Thousand Armed Image of the Bodhisattva of Compassion) drifted in the South Sea from the Mokji Kingdom. In total, there were three. One found a home at Unmunsa Temple, the other in an unknown location, while the final was enshrined at Daesansa Temple (Yongbongsa Temple). This would make the temple great. During the Imjin War, this statue of Gwanseeum-bosal was buried in the ground to hide it from Japanese looters. However, it’s claimed that a thief did in fact find the location of the statue. But when he was digging it up, the thief started to vomit blood and died while digging it up. However, by the late Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), when the temple was looted and set fire to, the statue of Gwanseeum-bosal was destroyed, as well. However, there is a claim that the statue was buried in a field before it and the temple were destroyed only to be rediscovered in 2000 in a neighbouring field. According to those that found it, this statue validates the temple legend of the statue of Gwanseeum-bosal. Whatever the case may be, it’s a rather interesting story connected to the once illustrious temple.

Temple Layout

Daesansa Temple is scenically located past the Daesan-ji Lake and up a side-winding mountain road that looks down on the valley below. As you first enter the grassy temple courtyard, you’ll notice the monks’ dorms and visitors’ centre book-ending the main hall at Daesansa Temple. Out in front of the Wontong-jeon Hall is a historic two-story pagoda that was obviously much larger once judging from its stout base. Lining the top of the base stone are several Buddhist related statues left behind by visitors.

Behind this pagoda rests the Wontong-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this newly built main hall are adorned with two separate sets of murals. The first, and the much larger ones below, are dedicated to the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). And above this, and much smaller and up near the eaves of the shrine hall, you’ll find a beautiful miniature set of the Shimu-do (The Ox-Herding Murals). The entire exterior to the main hall is adorned in vibrant dancheong colours.

Stepping inside the Wontong-jeon Hall, you’ll notice a rather unique set of main altar statues. The largest of the set is dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Joining this central statue to the left is a golden capped image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife), while to the right you’ll find an image of Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). Rounding out the interior of the main hall is a collection of artwork that includes an older mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal, as well as a Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

To the right and rear of the Wontong-jeon Hall are a collection of three shaman shrine halls. The first of these three, and to the far left rear, is the Sanshin-gak Hall. The all-natural wooden exterior houses a mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). Sanshin is joined in this mural by a dour-looking tiger. To the right of the Sanshin-gak Hall, and still to the rear of the main hall, is a somewhat larger shaman shrine hall. This shrine hall is the Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall are a pair of paintings. The first of these two paintings, and hanging on the main altar to the left, is an older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). And to the right hangs a beautifully vibrant mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).

The third, and final, shaman shrine hall directly to the right of the Wontong-jeon Hall is the Yongwang-dang Hall. The Yongwang-dang Hall is situated down a set of stone stairs. This shrine hall houses one of the more stunning paintings dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King) that I’ve seen in my travels throughout Korea. This masterful painting is a new addition to the temple, and the former red wooden tablet that used to be housed inside the Yongwang-dang Hall now rests out in front of the Yongwang-dang Hall.

How To Get There

From the Cheongdo Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to take Bus #1 and get off at the “Nokmyeong 2-ri” stop after seven stops, or 17 minutes. From this stop, you’ll then need to take a bus that reads “Punggak Sunhwa – 풍락 순환 버스.” After six stops, or 19 minutes, you’ll need to get off at the “Oksan 2-ri” stop. From this stop, you’ll need to walk for about 30 minutes, or 2.1 km, to get to the temple. Just follow the signs as you make your climb up towards Daesansa Temple.

Overall Rating: 6.5/10

The main highlight to this lesser known temple are all the shaman shrine halls and the artwork that they house inside them. For example, the painting dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King) is one of the finest that you’ll see at any temple in Korea. And the dour-looking tiger in the Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) painting is a surprise, as well. Also, the entire interior and exterior of the Wontong-jeon Hall is simply stunning. Daesansa Temple also enjoys a beautiful location. So when it’s all put together, Daesansa Temple in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do makes for a nice little escape from the busyness of daily life.

The view from the heights of the temple grounds. The Wontong-jeon Hall. The two-story stone pagoda in front of the main hall. A look at the main hall from the side. One of the paintings from the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). One of the Shimu-do (Ox-Herding Murals) that adorns the exterior of the Wontong-jeon Hall, as well. A look inside the Wontong-jeon Hall during morning worship. The Sanshin-gak Hall to the rear of the main hall. A look at Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) and his dour-looking tiger inside the Sanshin-gak Hall at Daesansa Temple. Next to the Sanshin-gak Hall is the Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall. An older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) inside the aforementioned shaman shrine hall. Joined by this modern painting dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And next to the Chilseong/Dokseong-gak Hall is the compact Yongwang-dang Hall and this amazing painting dedicated to Yongwang (The Dragon King).—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

Inner Peace Art Store
​​​​​​​

 

 

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ESL Teacher with F6 visa looking for part-time teaching job

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-15 11:11
Classified Ad Type: Location: 

Hi everyone,

I am an enthusiastic and dedicated ESL teacher living in Busan with a F6 Visa and plenty of experience teaching elementary, middle school and university students.

I am looking for a 2-3 days per week part-time teaching job.

Message me or email me if you are interested and I will send you a resume.

Kind regards. ^^

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Fan Meetup Announcement 2024

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-05-14 09:04

It's time for another meetup! I always have a great time meeting with fans in Korea, and I'm looking forward to seeing many of you again! We'll meet in Seoul, and the specific location and time will be in the video description. Make sure to RSVP if you're planning on attending so I can know how many people will be there.

The date will be Saturday, May 25th. Check out the RSVP link for the details.

The post Fan Meetup Announcement 2024 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

www.GoBillyKorean.com

 

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Janguisa Temple – 장의사 (Goseong, Gyeongsangnam-do)

Koreabridge - Sun, 2024-05-12 23:34
Springtime at Janguisa Temple in Goseong, Gyeongsangnam-do. Temple History

Janguisa Temple is located on the eastern slopes of Mt. Munamsan (459.4 m) in eastern Goseong, Gyeongsangnam-do. Janguisa Temple was first founded by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) in 642 A.D. After its founding, nothing is known about the temple’s history. In 1885, Janguisa Temple was destroyed by flooding. The temple was rebuilt in 1891 in its current location, which is lower on the mountain than its original location. The temple was rebuilt, once more, by the monk Hobong in 1920. And the temple we know today was rebuilt in the early 1960s.

Janguisa Temple is home to one provincial treasure, it’s the “Goseong Janguisa Stone Gwanseeum-bosal Statue,” which is Gyeongsangnam-do Tangible Cultural Property #511. However, it should be noted that this treasure is currently off-limits to the general public, as it doesn’t appear inside any of the shrine halls at Janguisa Temple.

Temple Layout

You first make your way up to Janguisa Temple up a winding mountain road that overlooks the harbour from some distance. Along the way, you’ll pass by the slender Iljumun Gate. Eventually, you’ll arrive at the temple parking lot with the temple to your right.

You’ll pass between the administrative offices at the temple, as well as the Jong-ru Pavilion to your right. Housed inside the Jong-ru Pavilion is a beautiful bronze bell with images of Buddhas and Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities) on it. Crowning the bronze bell is a two-headed image of a dragon.

Around the corner, and to the left, you’ll enter into the main temple courtyard at Janguisa Temple. Looking straight ahead, you’ll see the Daeung-jeon Hall, which has just recently been repainted. The exterior walls to the main hall are vibrantly adorned with images of various Buddhas and Bodhisattvas like Bohyeon-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Power), Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha), Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion), Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife), and Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom). In addition to these stunning paintings, there are also images of lotus flowers, Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag) and a collection of the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). Stepping inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a main altar occupied by a triad centred by Seokgamoni and joined on either side by a green haired image of Jijang-bosal and Gwanseeum-bosal. And rounding out the interior of the main hall is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) hanging on the far left wall.

To the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall is the administrative offices at Janguisa Temple, as well as the temple kitchen. In this area, and closer to the main hall, you’ll find an outdoor shrine dedicated to the Bodhisattva of Compassion. And to the right of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. The exterior walls to this hall are adorned with fading murals of the Bodhidharma and various Buddhist related murals. Stepping inside the Cheonbul-jeon Hall, you’ll find a shrine hall filled with smaller statues of Seokgamoni-bul, Jijang-bosal, and Gwanseeum-bosal. This is repeated on the main altar, where you’ll find the exact set same with the central image being that of the Historical Buddha being joined on either side by the Bodhisattva of Compassion and the Bodhisattva of the Afterlife.

Between the Cheonbul-jeon Hall and the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find a long flight of stairs. This leads up to the Samseong-gak Hall in the treeline. The exterior walls are adorned with simple dancheong colours. Stepping inside the shaman shrine hall, you’ll find four, instead of the more traditional three, shaman murals. The first, as you step inside, is the most original of the four. This painting is dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit); but instead of it being a male Mountain Spirit, this image is of a female Sanshin. The painting is reminiscent of the image of a female Sanshin found at Daewonsa Temple in Jirisan National Park. To the left of this female Sanshin is a modern, black accented, mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). To the left of this central painting is an older painting, probably painted at the same time as the female Sanshin, dedicated to a dour-looking Dokseong (Lonely Saint). Finally, and hanging on the far left wall, is a seated image of Yongwang (The Dragon King) being accompanied by a yellow dragon.

How To Get There

The easiest way to get to Janguisa Temple is by taxi. From the Goseong Intercity Bus Terminal, you can catch a taxi to the temple. It’ll take under 15 minutes, over 10 km, and it’ll cost about 15,000 won (one way). If you’re going in a group, this is probably the best way to travel.

However, if you’d rather public transportation, you can take Bus #989 to get to Janguisa Temple from the Goseong Intercity Bus Terminal. You’ll need to take this bus for 10 stops and get off at the “Ma-dong” bus stop. In total, the bus ride should take about 25 minutes. From where the bus drops you off, and this is where it gets difficult, you’ll need to walk nearly two kilometres north, which will take about 40 minutes, to get to Janguisa Temple. In total, the travel time should be just over an hour depending on how fast you hike.

Overall Rating: 6/10

While definitely lesser known, Janguisa Temple has a few highlights which are most noticeably the female Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) housed inside the Samseong-gak Hall and the newly painted murals adorning the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. On a clear day, you can enjoy the view out towards the harbour, as well as the bronze bell housed inside the Jong-ru Pavilion. Janguisa Temple definitely has a serene feeling to it.

The Iljumun Gate at Janguisa Temple. Walking towards the main temple courtyard with the Jong-ru Pavilion to the right. A look inside the Jong-ru Pavilion at the bronze bell. The Daeung-jeon Hall (left) and Cheonbul-jeon Hall (right). One of the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals) that adorns the exterior of the Daeung-jeon Hall. A mural of Munsu-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Wisdom) that adorns the Daeung-jeon Hall. Joined by this painting of Podae-hwasang (The Hempen Bag). As well as this painting of dongja (attendants) and pink lotus flowers. And this blue dragon. The main altar inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. Accompanied inside the main hall by this modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural). Inside the Cheonbul-jeon Hall. The long stairs leading up to the Samseong-gak Hall. The female Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) at Janguisa Temple. Joined by this mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars) inside the shaman shrine hall. As well as this older mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint).—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

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Single Room for Rent

Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-05-10 08:34
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan Geumjeong-gu Busandaehak-ro 64beon-gil 126

>Single room on the first floor available for rent
>Separate kitchen and washroom
>You can move in from 1st June,2024
>5 mins walking distance from north gate PNU
>5 min walk from Jangjeon station 
>Refrigerator, Washing machine, oven, Air conditioner, Table chair, clothes cabinet, bed are available
>Advance deposit of 1 Million and monthly rent of 250,000 plus 5,000 water bill.
>Gas and electric bill according to monthly usage
>Contact 010-28373922

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How Koreans Feel About Birth Rate Crisis | Street Interview

Koreabridge - Fri, 2024-05-10 05:44

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00:00 Do you want to have children?
02:28 What do you think of the low birth rate in Korea?
07:59 Why do Koreans not want to have children?
12:17 How much does it cost to raise a child in Korea?
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Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #6: Movie Theater – 영화관

Koreabridge - Thu, 2024-05-09 11:55

We're up to episode 6 in my free 20 episode "Conversation Course." Each week I'll post one new episode until it's completed. This course is for learners who've already completed the basics and want to start diving into real, natural Korean conversations. If you feel this lesson is a bit too difficult, I recommend first watching my free "Beginner Korean Course" which has 100 episodes and will take you through all of the basics.

In this series I'll walk you through every sentence one at a time, explaining the vocabulary, grammar, and nuances of everything we encounter. Feel free to pause and take notes! These conversations are natural and real, so there's a lot we can learn.

The post Billy Go’s Korean Conversation Course | #6: Movie Theater – 영화관 appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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Jukrimsa Temple – 죽림사 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-08 23:28
Part of a Modern Stupa at Jukrimsa Temple in Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Temple History

Jukrimsa Temple is located in the southern foothills of Mt. Yubongsan (245.1 m) in southern Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that the temple was first built in 809 A.D., but the exact history of the temple is unknown. The only details that we really know is that Jukrimsa Temple was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98) and then later rebuilt. There were several reconstructions conducted on the temple during the 1800s. However, during the Korean War (1950-53), the temple was destroyed. After a few decades, Jukrimsa Temple was built, once more, starting in 1990. In the ensuing years, the Daeung-jeon Hall, the Samseong-gak Hall, the Eungjin-jeon Hall, and the Yosachae (monks’ dorms) were built at the temple.

Jukrimsa Temple is home to a Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property, which is the main altar triad inside the Daeung-jeon Hall.

Temple Layout

About a kilometre and a half up a mountain road is Jukrimsa Temple. The first thing to greet you at the temple is the stately Iljumun Gate with stout, stone pillars. A little further up the road, but before you arrive at the temple grounds, you’ll notice a pair of ornate stupas to your right. These modern stupas are near replicas of the one found at Seonamsa Temple on Mt. Baekyangsan in Busan-jin, Busan. These stupas are adorned with decorative dragons, elephants, tigers, Bicheon (Flying Heavenly Deities), as well as an image of Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). And just beyond these large, ornate stupas are a row of older stupas.

With a slight incline in the mountain road, you’ll finally near the outskirts of the main temple grounds. Up an uneven set of stone stairs, you’ll make your way under the two-story Boje-ru Pavilion. The first story acts as an entry to the main temple courtyard, while the second story acts as a lecture hall for larger dharma talks. The pavilion is adorned in simplistic dancheong colours, while being surrounded on all sides by rose bushes, Japanese maples, and various shrubs.

Now standing squarely in the main temple courtyard, you’ll find a three-story pagoda out in front of the Daeung-jeon Hall. There is a stone barrier surrounding the pagoda with stone lotus images on all sides of the structure. The pagoda is modern, while also reminiscent of a Silla-era design. To your left, you’ll find the monks’ dorms, while straight ahead of you is the Daeung-jeon Hall. Out in front of the main hall are a collection of stone statues. To the far left is an image dedicated to Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Joining this statue in this area are three statues embodying the idea of “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.” And to the far right, you’ll find a stone triad centred by Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise).

Surrounding the exterior walls of the Daeung-jeon Hall are a collection of simple Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life). Stepping inside the main hall, and resting on the main altar, is the Gyeongsangbuk-do Tangible Cultural Property. The main altar triad is centred by an image dedicated to Seokgamoni-bul (The Historical Buddha). And joining this central image on either side are statues dedicated to Jijang-bosal and Gwanseeum-bosal. The statue of Seokgamoni-bul stands 1.33 metres in height. The statue has a robust chest with smooth shoulders. Its robe hangs over only one shoulder. It’s believed that the statue dates back to the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Additionally, the statue had damage to both its neck and face, which has subsequently been repaired. Also, the statue has two new hands. Overall, the statue is both stately and imposing. There are a couple murals that hang inside the Daeung-jeon Hall like the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) that hangs on the far left wall, as well as the red mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal on the far right wall. Rather interestingly, and to the bottom left of the mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal, are a collection of pictures. The far left picture is of Park Chung Hee (1917-79, the central picture is that of his wife, Yuk Young-soo (1925-74), and the final picture is of Roh Moo-hyun (1946-2009).

To the left of the Daeung-jeon Hall, you’ll find two temple shrine halls. The first of these two is the Samseong-gak Hall. The exterior walls are adorned in simple dancheong colours. Stepping inside the shaman shrine hall, you’ll find three different murals. These murals consist of one dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars), another dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit), and the final dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And the other shrine hall that visitors can explore at Jukrimsa Temple is the Eungjin-jeon Hall to the left of the Samseong-gak Hall. Housed inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall is an all-white main altar triad centred by Seokgamoni-bul and joined on either side by images of Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) and Yeondeung-bul (The Past Buddha). And on either side of this main altar triad are white images of the Nahan (The Historical Disciples of the Buddha).

How To Get There

There are no direct buses that go to Jukrimsa Temple in Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. So the most direct way to get to the temple is by taxi from the Yeongcheon Intercity Bus Terminal. The bus ride will take about 15 minutes and cost about 10,000 won.

Overall Rating: 6.5/10

While there isn’t one huge highlight at Jukrimsa Temple, there are several smaller ones like the two ornate modern stupas at the entry of the temple grounds, the main altar triad inside the Daeung-jeon Hall, and the shaman paintings and Nahan statues inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall. The temple grounds are quite tranquil, as well.

The Iljumun Gate at the entry of Jukrimsa Temple. The wonderfully ornate modern stupa at the temple. A close-up of one of the Bicheon (a Flying Heavenly Deity) reliefs that adorns the side of the stupa. The ornate modern stupa from a different angle. And an up-close of the decorative dragon that adorns the stupa. The Boje-ru Pavilion at Jukrimsa Temple. A beautiful red rose next to the entry gate. A look through the first floor of the two-story Boje-ru Pavilion. The modern three-story pagoda and Daeung-jeon Hall at Jukrimsa Temple. The three statues dedicated to the “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil” motif. A look inside the Daeung-jeon Hall. The Samseong-gak Hall. The Sanshin (Mountain Spirit) mural housed inside the shaman shrine hall. The Eungjin-jeon Hall. And a look inside the Eungjin-jeon Hall.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

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JRYN Dermatology Seomyeon, Busan - May Family Month Event 1

Koreabridge - Wed, 2024-05-08 05:57
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://jryn.co.kr/

JRYN Dermatology is located in Seomyeon, a city visited by many foreigners.

We are holding regular events so that many people can receive a variety of treatments at a reasonable price, and rather than performing simple treatments, we make an overwhelming difference with customized treatments that are effective and suitable for each individual's skin.

If you are looking for a dermatologist in Busan, experience the beauty lounge at JRYN Dermatology in Seomyeon.

English support is available, and we also offer special discounts for foreigners, so please show your interest and use it!

JRYN special gift for May! (korea won)

Benefit 1 --Wrinkle elasticity!
Additional 10% discount on all lifting laser products--

-

Hair removal, pigmentation, and sweat glands all in one!

Benefit 2 --Clean and soft armpits
Package 1 year subscription 99,000 --
Armpit hair removal + armpit whitening and toning + sweat gland botox

-

Healthy and beautiful skin!

Benefit 3 -- JRYN Signature
Pore/acne/whitening 50 free passes 290,000 --

If you have any further questions, consultation, or need to make a reservation, please contact us using the information below!

We are always ready to welcome you, so please don’t worry and visit us ^^

main number : 051-991-7575

http://jryn.co.kr/

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Important Hanja: LIFE 생 (生) (한자) | Korean FAQ

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-05-07 11:39

생 (生) is a Hanja with the meaning of "life" or "birth," and can also be used for several related meanings such as "raw," "occur," and even "natural."

The post Important Hanja: LIFE 생 (生) (한자) | Korean FAQ appeared first on Learn Korean with GO! Billy Korean.

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BGN Eye Hospital May Event

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-05-07 06:37
Classified Ad Type: Location: Neighborhood: Busan

Find your way to clear vision this May!

Get 200,000 KRW discount for the surgery on the examination day!

Get Healon eye drops for all TRIPLE surgery options!

Event is valid for all SMILE PRO, SMILE, LASEK, LASIK surgeries

*Event is valid from May 1st to May 31st 2024

Book your appointment at:

Phone: 010-7670-3995

kakao: eye1004bgnbusan

Email: [email protected]

4.26 May evemt.png
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Zen Clinic

Koreabridge - Tue, 2024-05-07 05:45
Location: Business/Organization Type: Website: http://www.zenclinic.co.kr/index_zen.php

Zen Clinic Centum City, Busan - a variety of plastic surgery

Zen Clinic in Busan is a clean, state of the art modern plastic surgery clinic located in Centum City, Busan. We offer many services and would like the foreign community to know that you have a place to go if you are looking for treatments to better improve yourself.

Zen Clinic Plastic Surgery Subjects

eye surgery
nose surgery
breast surgery
liposuction

We perform a variety of plastic surgeries.

It is conducted by medical staff with extensive experience and skills.

If you have any questions please feel free to send a message (100% English) or call 051-918-7757/7755.  010-4401-7757.
You can ask for DR. Kim or DR. Park 

Thank you and we appreciate the work you do in Korea!

www.zenclinic.co.kr

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Bukdaeam Hermitage – 북대암 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

Koreabridge - Mon, 2024-05-06 23:13
Unmunsa Temple from the Heights of Bukdaeam Hermitage in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Hermitage History

Bukdaeam Hermitage is located on the Unmunsa Temple grounds in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Both Bukdaeam Hermitage and Unmunsa Temple are situated to the north of a cauldron of mountains that includes Mt. Unmunsan (1,188 m) and Mt. Gajisan (1,240.9 m). Purportedly, Bukdaeam Hermitage is the first temple or hermitage built on Mt. Unmunsan. However, the exact date of its founding is unknown, but it’s speculated that it was first built in 557 A.D. The hermitage was later reconstructed in 1851 and continues to be repaired and rebuilt to the present day. As for the name of the hermitage, Bukdaeam Hermitage, it gets its name from being built so high up on the mountain like a swallow’s nest.

Hermitage Layout

You first approach Bukdaeam Hermitage up a long, winding mountain road that eventually becomes a steep and winding trail. After a few hundred metres up the mountain trail, you’ll come to the hermitage’s grounds. The first things to greet you are a wall of hermitage buildings that include the nuns’ living quarters and kitchen. To the right, and a little further along the trail, you’ll notice a beautiful hall on a mountain ledge. This colourful hall is the Dokseong/Sanshin-gak Hall. Climbing up the very steep stairs, you’ll find an image dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) with a wispy, white beard and a ferocious tiger at his side. Sanshin is joined by an older image dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). And it’s from this shaman shrine hall that you get amazing views of the valley below.

Beneath the Dokseong/Sanshin-gak Hall, you’ll find a much broader ledge. It’s here that you’ll find the main hall. The exterior walls of the Geukrak-jeon Hall are adorned in a beautiful collection of Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals). Stepping inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall, you’ll find a central triad on the main altar. This triad consists of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) in the centre joined by Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) and Jijang-bosal (The Bodhisattva of the Afterlife). To the left of this triad is a mural dedicated to Jijang-bosal, while to the left is a modern Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural).

Out in front of the Geukrak-jeon Hall is a solitary stone lantern. It’s from this vantage point that you get an amazing view of Unmunsa Temple down in the valley below. Unfortunately, there are several black power lines that interfere with the view. To the left of the main hall are some more nuns’ quarters. And behind the Geukrak-jeon Hall sits the hermitage’s Chilseong-gak Hall. Housed inside this shaman shrine hall is an older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars).

It should be noted that both Unmunsa Temple and Bukdaeam Hermitage are best visited in the fall when the leaves are changing colours. They are probably two of the better locations to enjoy fall in Korea.

How To Get There

To get to Bukdaeam Hermitage, you first need to get to Unmunsa Temple. And to get to Unmunsa Temple, you’ll need to get to the Cheongdo Intercity Bus Terminal. From the Cheongdo Intercity Bus Terminal, you’ll need to catch the bus that runs to Unmunsa Temple. This bus runs eight times a day. The first bus leaves at 7:40 a.m., and the last bus leaves at 7:30 p.m. Then from Unmunsa Temple’s front gate, you’ll need to walk 300 metres to a stone marker that points you in the direction of Bukdaeam Hermitage. After turning left at the stone marker that reads “북대암,” you’ll need to hike up the road that eventually becomes a trail. In total, the strenuous hike lasts about 700 metres.

Overall Rating: 6/10

The views alone make a trip to Bukdaeam Hermitage well worth it. In addition to all of this natural beauty, you can also enjoy all the shaman murals at the hermitage like the original mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit) or the older mural dedicated to Chilseong (The Seven Stars). And if you’re at Bukdaeam Hermitage, you’ll most likely visit Unmunsa Temple, as well. Together they make for a very pleasant day trip to the countryside.

The trail leading up to Bukdaeam Hermitage. The Geukrak-jeon Hall at the hermitage. One of the Palsang-do (The Eight Scenes from the Buddha’s Life Murals) that adorns the exterior of the main hall. A look inside the Geukrak-jeon Hall at the main altar. The solitary seokdeung (stone lantern) out in front of the Geukrak-jeon Hall. The Chilseong-gak Hall at Bukdaeam Hermitage. The mural dedicated to the Seven Stars inside the Chilseong-gak Hall. The view from the Chilseong-gak Hall overtop the Geukrak-jeon Hall. A look towards the Dokseong/Sanshin-gak Hall. An older mural dedicated to Sanshin (The Mountain Spirit). And joined by this equally older mural dedicated to Dokseong (The Lonely Saint). A look down on Unmunsa Temple. With a closer look at the amazing temple.—

KoreanTempleGuide.com

Dale's Korean Temple Adventures YouTube

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